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How to Write a Good Lab Conclusion in Science

Last Updated: June 4, 2023 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Bess Ruff, MA . Bess Ruff is a Geography PhD student at Florida State University. She received her MA in Environmental Science and Management from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2016. She has conducted survey work for marine spatial planning projects in the Caribbean and provided research support as a graduate fellow for the Sustainable Fisheries Group. There are 11 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 1,751,362 times.

A lab report describes an entire experiment from start to finish, outlining the procedures, reporting results, and analyzing data. The report is used to demonstrate what has been learned, and it will provide a way for other people to see your process for the experiment and understand how you arrived at your conclusions. The conclusion is an integral part of the report; this is the section that reiterates the experiment’s main findings and gives the reader an overview of the lab trial. Writing a solid conclusion to your lab report will demonstrate that you’ve effectively learned the objectives of your assignment.

Outlining Your Conclusion

Step 1 Go over your assignment.

  • Restate : Restate the lab experiment by describing the assignment.
  • Explain : Explain the purpose of the lab experiment. What were you trying to figure out or discover? Talk briefly about the procedure you followed to complete the lab.
  • Results : Explain your results. Confirm whether or not your hypothesis was supported by the results.
  • Uncertainties : Account for uncertainties and errors. Explain, for example, if there were other circumstances beyond your control that might have impacted the experiment’s results.
  • New : Discuss new questions or discoveries that emerged from the experiment.

Step 4 Plan other sections to add.

  • Your assignment may also have specific questions that need to be answered. Make sure you answer these fully and coherently in your conclusion.

Discussing the Experiment and Hypothesis

Step 1 Introduce the experiment in your conclusion.

  • If you tried the experiment more than once, describe the reasons for doing so. Discuss changes that you made in your procedures.
  • Brainstorm ways to explain your results in more depth. Go back through your lab notes, paying particular attention to the results you observed. [5] X Trustworthy Source University of North Carolina Writing Center UNC's on-campus and online instructional service that provides assistance to students, faculty, and others during the writing process Go to source

Step 3 Describe what you discovered briefly.

  • Start this section with wording such as, “The results showed that…”
  • You don’t need to give the raw data here. Just summarize the main points, calculate averages, or give a range of data to give an overall picture to the reader.
  • Make sure to explain whether or not any statistical analyses were significant, and to what degree, such as 1%, 5%, or 10%.

Step 4 Comment on whether or not your hypothesis is supported.

  • Use simple language such as, “The results supported the hypothesis,” or “The results did not support the hypothesis.”

Step 5 Link your results to your hypothesis.

Demonstrating What You Have Learned

Step 1 Describe what you learned in the lab.

  • If it’s not clear in your conclusion what you learned from the lab, start off by writing, “In this lab, I learned…” This will give the reader a heads up that you will be describing exactly what you learned.
  • Add details about what you learned and how you learned it. Adding dimension to your learning outcomes will convince your reader that you did, in fact, learn from the lab. Give specifics about how you learned that molecules will act in a particular environment, for example.
  • Describe how what you learned in the lab could be applied to a future experiment.

Step 2 Answer specific questions given in the assignment.

  • On a new line, write the question in italics. On the next line, write the answer to the question in regular text.

Step 3 Explain whether you achieved the experiment’s objectives.

  • If your experiment did not achieve the objectives, explain or speculate why not.

Wrapping Up Your Conclusion

Step 1 Describe possible errors that may have occurred.

  • If your experiment raised questions that your collected data can’t answer, discuss this here.

Step 3 Propose future experiments.

  • Describe what is new or innovative about your research.
  • This can often set you apart from your classmates, many of whom will just write up the barest of discussion and conclusion.

Step 6 Add a final statement.

Finalizing Your Lab Report

Step 1 Write in the third person.

Community Q&A

wikiHow Staff Editor

  • If you include figures or tables in your conclusion, be sure to include a brief caption or label so that the reader knows what the figures refer to. Also, discuss the figures briefly in the text of your report. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Once again, avoid using personal pronouns (I, myself, we, our group) in a lab report. The first-person point-of-view is often seen as subjective, whereas science is based on objectivity. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Ensure the language used is straightforward with specific details. Try not to drift off topic. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

write good lab conclusion

  • Take care with writing your lab report when working in a team setting. While the lab experiment may be a collaborative effort, your lab report is your own work. If you copy sections from someone else’s report, this will be considered plagiarism. Thanks Helpful 3 Not Helpful 0

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  • ↑ https://phoenixcollege.libguides.com/LabReportWriting/introduction
  • ↑ https://www.hcs-k12.org/userfiles/354/Classes/18203/conclusionwriting.pdf
  • ↑ https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/discipline/english/literacy/Pages/puttingittogether.aspx
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/brainstorming/
  • ↑ https://advice.writing.utoronto.ca/types-of-writing/lab-report/
  • ↑ http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/hypothes.php
  • ↑ https://libguides.usc.edu/writingguide/conclusion
  • ↑ https://libguides.usc.edu/writingguide/introduction/researchproblem
  • ↑ http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/scientific-reports/
  • ↑ https://phoenixcollege.libguides.com/LabReportWriting/labreportstyle
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/editing-and-proofreading/

About This Article

Bess Ruff, MA

To write a good lab conclusion in science, start with restating the lab experiment by describing the assignment. Next, explain what you were trying to discover or figure out by doing the experiment. Then, list your results and explain how they confirmed or did not confirm your hypothesis. Additionally, include any uncertainties, such as circumstances beyond your control that may have impacted the results. Finally, discuss any new questions or discoveries that emerged from the experiment. For more advice, including how to wrap up your lab report with a final statement, keep reading. Did this summary help you? Yes No

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How To Write A Lab Report | Step-by-Step Guide & Examples

Published on May 20, 2021 by Pritha Bhandari . Revised on July 23, 2023.

A lab report conveys the aim, methods, results, and conclusions of a scientific experiment. The main purpose of a lab report is to demonstrate your understanding of the scientific method by performing and evaluating a hands-on lab experiment. This type of assignment is usually shorter than a research paper .

Lab reports are commonly used in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. This article focuses on how to structure and write a lab report.

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Table of contents

Structuring a lab report, introduction, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about lab reports.

The sections of a lab report can vary between scientific fields and course requirements, but they usually contain the purpose, methods, and findings of a lab experiment .

Each section of a lab report has its own purpose.

  • Title: expresses the topic of your study
  • Abstract : summarizes your research aims, methods, results, and conclusions
  • Introduction: establishes the context needed to understand the topic
  • Method: describes the materials and procedures used in the experiment
  • Results: reports all descriptive and inferential statistical analyses
  • Discussion: interprets and evaluates results and identifies limitations
  • Conclusion: sums up the main findings of your experiment
  • References: list of all sources cited using a specific style (e.g. APA )
  • Appendices : contains lengthy materials, procedures, tables or figures

Although most lab reports contain these sections, some sections can be omitted or combined with others. For example, some lab reports contain a brief section on research aims instead of an introduction, and a separate conclusion is not always required.

If you’re not sure, it’s best to check your lab report requirements with your instructor.

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Your title provides the first impression of your lab report – effective titles communicate the topic and/or the findings of your study in specific terms.

Create a title that directly conveys the main focus or purpose of your study. It doesn’t need to be creative or thought-provoking, but it should be informative.

  • The effects of varying nitrogen levels on tomato plant height.
  • Testing the universality of the McGurk effect.
  • Comparing the viscosity of common liquids found in kitchens.

An abstract condenses a lab report into a brief overview of about 150–300 words. It should provide readers with a compact version of the research aims, the methods and materials used, the main results, and the final conclusion.

Think of it as a way of giving readers a preview of your full lab report. Write the abstract last, in the past tense, after you’ve drafted all the other sections of your report, so you’ll be able to succinctly summarize each section.

To write a lab report abstract, use these guiding questions:

  • What is the wider context of your study?
  • What research question were you trying to answer?
  • How did you perform the experiment?
  • What did your results show?
  • How did you interpret your results?
  • What is the importance of your findings?

Nitrogen is a necessary nutrient for high quality plants. Tomatoes, one of the most consumed fruits worldwide, rely on nitrogen for healthy leaves and stems to grow fruit. This experiment tested whether nitrogen levels affected tomato plant height in a controlled setting. It was expected that higher levels of nitrogen fertilizer would yield taller tomato plants.

Levels of nitrogen fertilizer were varied between three groups of tomato plants. The control group did not receive any nitrogen fertilizer, while one experimental group received low levels of nitrogen fertilizer, and a second experimental group received high levels of nitrogen fertilizer. All plants were grown from seeds, and heights were measured 50 days into the experiment.

The effects of nitrogen levels on plant height were tested between groups using an ANOVA. The plants with the highest level of nitrogen fertilizer were the tallest, while the plants with low levels of nitrogen exceeded the control group plants in height. In line with expectations and previous findings, the effects of nitrogen levels on plant height were statistically significant. This study strengthens the importance of nitrogen for tomato plants.

Your lab report introduction should set the scene for your experiment. One way to write your introduction is with a funnel (an inverted triangle) structure:

  • Start with the broad, general research topic
  • Narrow your topic down your specific study focus
  • End with a clear research question

Begin by providing background information on your research topic and explaining why it’s important in a broad real-world or theoretical context. Describe relevant previous research on your topic and note how your study may confirm it or expand it, or fill a gap in the research field.

This lab experiment builds on previous research from Haque, Paul, and Sarker (2011), who demonstrated that tomato plant yield increased at higher levels of nitrogen. However, the present research focuses on plant height as a growth indicator and uses a lab-controlled setting instead.

Next, go into detail on the theoretical basis for your study and describe any directly relevant laws or equations that you’ll be using. State your main research aims and expectations by outlining your hypotheses .

Based on the importance of nitrogen for tomato plants, the primary hypothesis was that the plants with the high levels of nitrogen would grow the tallest. The secondary hypothesis was that plants with low levels of nitrogen would grow taller than plants with no nitrogen.

Your introduction doesn’t need to be long, but you may need to organize it into a few paragraphs or with subheadings such as “Research Context” or “Research Aims.”

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A lab report Method section details the steps you took to gather and analyze data. Give enough detail so that others can follow or evaluate your procedures. Write this section in the past tense. If you need to include any long lists of procedural steps or materials, place them in the Appendices section but refer to them in the text here.

You should describe your experimental design, your subjects, materials, and specific procedures used for data collection and analysis.

Experimental design

Briefly note whether your experiment is a within-subjects  or between-subjects design, and describe how your sample units were assigned to conditions if relevant.

A between-subjects design with three groups of tomato plants was used. The control group did not receive any nitrogen fertilizer. The first experimental group received a low level of nitrogen fertilizer, while the second experimental group received a high level of nitrogen fertilizer.

Describe human subjects in terms of demographic characteristics, and animal or plant subjects in terms of genetic background. Note the total number of subjects as well as the number of subjects per condition or per group. You should also state how you recruited subjects for your study.

List the equipment or materials you used to gather data and state the model names for any specialized equipment.

List of materials

35 Tomato seeds

15 plant pots (15 cm tall)

Light lamps (50,000 lux)

Nitrogen fertilizer

Measuring tape

Describe your experimental settings and conditions in detail. You can provide labelled diagrams or images of the exact set-up necessary for experimental equipment. State how extraneous variables were controlled through restriction or by fixing them at a certain level (e.g., keeping the lab at room temperature).

Light levels were fixed throughout the experiment, and the plants were exposed to 12 hours of light a day. Temperature was restricted to between 23 and 25℃. The pH and carbon levels of the soil were also held constant throughout the experiment as these variables could influence plant height. The plants were grown in rooms free of insects or other pests, and they were spaced out adequately.

Your experimental procedure should describe the exact steps you took to gather data in chronological order. You’ll need to provide enough information so that someone else can replicate your procedure, but you should also be concise. Place detailed information in the appendices where appropriate.

In a lab experiment, you’ll often closely follow a lab manual to gather data. Some instructors will allow you to simply reference the manual and state whether you changed any steps based on practical considerations. Other instructors may want you to rewrite the lab manual procedures as complete sentences in coherent paragraphs, while noting any changes to the steps that you applied in practice.

If you’re performing extensive data analysis, be sure to state your planned analysis methods as well. This includes the types of tests you’ll perform and any programs or software you’ll use for calculations (if relevant).

First, tomato seeds were sown in wooden flats containing soil about 2 cm below the surface. Each seed was kept 3-5 cm apart. The flats were covered to keep the soil moist until germination. The seedlings were removed and transplanted to pots 8 days later, with a maximum of 2 plants to a pot. Each pot was watered once a day to keep the soil moist.

The nitrogen fertilizer treatment was applied to the plant pots 12 days after transplantation. The control group received no treatment, while the first experimental group received a low concentration, and the second experimental group received a high concentration. There were 5 pots in each group, and each plant pot was labelled to indicate the group the plants belonged to.

50 days after the start of the experiment, plant height was measured for all plants. A measuring tape was used to record the length of the plant from ground level to the top of the tallest leaf.

In your results section, you should report the results of any statistical analysis procedures that you undertook. You should clearly state how the results of statistical tests support or refute your initial hypotheses.

The main results to report include:

  • any descriptive statistics
  • statistical test results
  • the significance of the test results
  • estimates of standard error or confidence intervals

The mean heights of the plants in the control group, low nitrogen group, and high nitrogen groups were 20.3, 25.1, and 29.6 cm respectively. A one-way ANOVA was applied to calculate the effect of nitrogen fertilizer level on plant height. The results demonstrated statistically significant ( p = .03) height differences between groups.

Next, post-hoc tests were performed to assess the primary and secondary hypotheses. In support of the primary hypothesis, the high nitrogen group plants were significantly taller than the low nitrogen group and the control group plants. Similarly, the results supported the secondary hypothesis: the low nitrogen plants were taller than the control group plants.

These results can be reported in the text or in tables and figures. Use text for highlighting a few key results, but present large sets of numbers in tables, or show relationships between variables with graphs.

You should also include sample calculations in the Results section for complex experiments. For each sample calculation, provide a brief description of what it does and use clear symbols. Present your raw data in the Appendices section and refer to it to highlight any outliers or trends.

The Discussion section will help demonstrate your understanding of the experimental process and your critical thinking skills.

In this section, you can:

  • Interpret your results
  • Compare your findings with your expectations
  • Identify any sources of experimental error
  • Explain any unexpected results
  • Suggest possible improvements for further studies

Interpreting your results involves clarifying how your results help you answer your main research question. Report whether your results support your hypotheses.

  • Did you measure what you sought out to measure?
  • Were your analysis procedures appropriate for this type of data?

Compare your findings with other research and explain any key differences in findings.

  • Are your results in line with those from previous studies or your classmates’ results? Why or why not?

An effective Discussion section will also highlight the strengths and limitations of a study.

  • Did you have high internal validity or reliability?
  • How did you establish these aspects of your study?

When describing limitations, use specific examples. For example, if random error contributed substantially to the measurements in your study, state the particular sources of error (e.g., imprecise apparatus) and explain ways to improve them.

The results support the hypothesis that nitrogen levels affect plant height, with increasing levels producing taller plants. These statistically significant results are taken together with previous research to support the importance of nitrogen as a nutrient for tomato plant growth.

However, unlike previous studies, this study focused on plant height as an indicator of plant growth in the present experiment. Importantly, plant height may not always reflect plant health or fruit yield, so measuring other indicators would have strengthened the study findings.

Another limitation of the study is the plant height measurement technique, as the measuring tape was not suitable for plants with extreme curvature. Future studies may focus on measuring plant height in different ways.

The main strengths of this study were the controls for extraneous variables, such as pH and carbon levels of the soil. All other factors that could affect plant height were tightly controlled to isolate the effects of nitrogen levels, resulting in high internal validity for this study.

Your conclusion should be the final section of your lab report. Here, you’ll summarize the findings of your experiment, with a brief overview of the strengths and limitations, and implications of your study for further research.

Some lab reports may omit a Conclusion section because it overlaps with the Discussion section, but you should check with your instructor before doing so.

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A lab report conveys the aim, methods, results, and conclusions of a scientific experiment . Lab reports are commonly assigned in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

The purpose of a lab report is to demonstrate your understanding of the scientific method with a hands-on lab experiment. Course instructors will often provide you with an experimental design and procedure. Your task is to write up how you actually performed the experiment and evaluate the outcome.

In contrast, a research paper requires you to independently develop an original argument. It involves more in-depth research and interpretation of sources and data.

A lab report is usually shorter than a research paper.

The sections of a lab report can vary between scientific fields and course requirements, but it usually contains the following:

  • Abstract: summarizes your research aims, methods, results, and conclusions
  • References: list of all sources cited using a specific style (e.g. APA)
  • Appendices: contains lengthy materials, procedures, tables or figures

The results chapter or section simply and objectively reports what you found, without speculating on why you found these results. The discussion interprets the meaning of the results, puts them in context, and explains why they matter.

In qualitative research , results and discussion are sometimes combined. But in quantitative research , it’s considered important to separate the objective results from your interpretation of them.

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How to write a lab report conclusion.

How to Write a Lab Report Conclusion

Like other reports, without a conclusion, a lab report is incomplete. Conclusions are an integral part of lab reports and are fundamental to the demonstration of report objectives and reiteration of findings.

Although conclusions are often short, confined to a paragraph, they are nonetheless some of the most difficult aspects of a lab report.

This article will, therefore, explain how to write a good conclusion for a lab report. But before that, it will remind you of the basics and format of lab reports for a comprehensive exposition.

Basic Lab Report

All reports describe the process of an experiment or a study from the beginning to the end. There are several categories of reports and a lab report is one of them.

A lab report follows the same routine as a typical report. Except that in a lab report, you are mostly dealing with scientific and laboratory experiments. In other words, a lab report describes the process of a scientific and laboratory experiment from the beginning to the end.

A lab report is required to test what students — whether chemistry students or biology students — had learned in the course of an experiment.

Ideally, a lab report begins with an introduction and ends with a conclusion. Conclusion is often the part where the results of experiments are reiterated and readers are provided with a short but general overview of the whole process.

Science Lab Report Format

Unlike other reports, a lab report is fundamentally a science experiment report. A scientific report documents the process, procedures, and findings of scientific research.

An example of a scientific report is an academic essay a teacher asked you to submit about technology or the one you wrote about cancer.

Whether your lab report is biological or chemical, there is a format to all scientific reports. A typical scientific laboratory report will contain:

  • Purpose: A brief description of what the research is all about, including the methods used and the resources available to the student.
  • Hypothesis: Guess statements on expected results of the scientific experiment.
  • Procedure: A step-by-step guide and instructions followed by the student in the course of the experiment.
  • Lab Safety: Safety precautions adhered to by the student throughout the experiment.
  • Data: Recorded experimental data generated on the experiment by the student.
  • Observations: The sudden burst of insight and perspectives about the experiment.
  • Results: The findings of the student from the experiment through collected data and observations.
  • Conclusion: Summary of the experiment, most especially as the findings relate to the report’s purpose and hypothesis.

Lab Report Conclusion

As a university or college science student, writing a lab report might not be new to you but it is a challenging process. This is because the whole lab report structure consumes. From the objective of the experiment to lab report conclusions, each structure wrestles for time.

Learning how to write a discussion and conclusion for a lab report is not the same as learning how to write a lab report itself. While it could be said that knowing the latter should help with the former, it is not always so. There are several examples of great lab reports with shabby conclusions.

Conclusions can prove tricky and this is the reason why you need to learn how to write them. To conclude lab reports, you would need to be familiar with the lab report conclusion outline (also called the lab report conclusion template). You can consider the following 5 outlines:

The first step to take before you conclude your reports is to assess the whole report from the beginning to where it stopped. This means you would need to visit and revisit the whole experiment to be sure that no structure of your report is left out.

The purpose of this is for you to go through the process of the report again. Experiments are usually consuming and at some points, you might get lost or stuck in a part and thereby lose that sense of touch with other parts. But if you can assess the whole experiment again, it would be easy to jot down the process in the report for a succinct conclusion.

After you might have assessed the whole report, you would need to pay more attention to the introduction of your report under this step. You should be looking at the proposed purpose of your report here and see if it tallies with what you intend to conclude with.

The introductory part of your report must align with the conclusive part. The introduction part should not be saying something different from the conclusion unless your report risks a crime of inconsistency. Consistency is essential to every great scientific and laboratory report.

Now that you have assessed the general report and the introductory, the next stage is to apply the RERUN Method to conclude your report. The RERUN is a useful acronym for integrating the essential parts of your experiment in your conclusion. Just as the rest of the report, conclusions also contain key ingredients.

RERUN stands for Restate, Explain, Results, Uncertainties , and New . To brilliantly conclude your report, you would need to follow the acronym and apply what each letter stands for.

When you want to conclude, you should Restate the lab experiment and Explain what the whole project is set out to achieve. Then proceed to explain the Results through the generated data and confirmation of the hypothesis. After that, make provisions for the Uncertainty and discuss New matters or solutions arising from the experiment.

  • Add Sections If necessary, you should add other sections of your experiment. Depending on the purpose of your project, you might need to add your data procedures or part of your observations to it. While the RERUN Method is a great way to conclude, it is not absolute. For instance, you may ask yourself “What is the importance of calculations in a lab report or my lab report?” and try to include the section where necessary.
  • Conclusive Assessment Once you are done with the conclusion, you should assess that part again. You should look out for errors, consistency, and how the whole part of your report reads with and without that portion of the added conclusion. How long should a lab report conclusion be? It should be as concise and precise as possible.

Examples of Lab Report Conclusion

Provided are examples of a good scientific report conclusion and a bad one. The good one follows the outlines of concluding a report while the bad one negates the outlines. Through the examples, you can glean how best to conclude your report.

Good Example

A good report conclusion will contain all 5 outlines (mentioned above) that can be deployed for summing up your reports. Here is an example:

“In conclusion, team management is a process and only indicates the many strategies that go into it, helped by effective decision-making sequential and procedural. Since most decisions begin from problems, it is pertinent that the processes of decision-making reflect the identification of problems, definition of them, decision, action, and feedback. Through the sequences, it would be noted that decision-making can be programmed or non-programmed, depending on the flexibility and occurrence; and can be operational, tactical, or strategic, depending on the duration of the problem needed to be solved. Besides, there are styles of decision-making, informed by actions. These actions, however, should always be checked and balanced through effective feedback.”

Before the report conclusion was written, a general assessment of the whole report was made to jot down the process and relearned the experience. The first report hinges on team management and decision-making, both themes were justified.

Also, through an introductory assessment, the topic sentence and purpose of the report were clear. The conclusion was well-organized and the report was not bereft of the conclusion outlines not excluding the RERUN Method.

Bad Example

This is one of the examples of a bad report conclusion.

“The infant stage is considered fundamental. It is the stage where all other stages are premised. It is thus plausible that development theories be looked at from this stage. The stage shows how Piaget’s and Vygotsky’s theories work, which in turn provide perspectives to understanding breastfeeding and mental health in infants.”

From the conclusion, it can be gleaned that the report does not follow the outlines as well as the RERUN Method. The thesis statement was unclear and the conclusion itself seems hurriedly done.

Need Help With Writing a Lab Report Conclusion?

Learning how to write a conclusion for a biology lab report or a chemistry lab report or just any other lab report can be challenging. You could bypass the challenges, anyway, by hiring cheap and trusted homework help or an expert. You would need to be certain they could be trusted with your deadline and are quality enough to earn you top grades in class. Otherwise, you should learn the nitty-gritty of lab reports yourself.

It shouldn’t be difficult to learn how to end a conclusion in a lab report, considering that this article has taken you through the process of lab report itself and then the outlines of lab report conclusions. Also provided are lab report conclusion examples — both good and bad — that you can model yours after.

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  • How to Write Discussions and Conclusions

How to Write Discussions and Conclusions

The discussion section contains the results and outcomes of a study. An effective discussion informs readers what can be learned from your experiment and provides context for the results.

What makes an effective discussion?

When you’re ready to write your discussion, you’ve already introduced the purpose of your study and provided an in-depth description of the methodology. The discussion informs readers about the larger implications of your study based on the results. Highlighting these implications while not overstating the findings can be challenging, especially when you’re submitting to a journal that selects articles based on novelty or potential impact. Regardless of what journal you are submitting to, the discussion section always serves the same purpose: concluding what your study results actually mean.

A successful discussion section puts your findings in context. It should include:

  • the results of your research,
  • a discussion of related research, and
  • a comparison between your results and initial hypothesis.

Tip: Not all journals share the same naming conventions.

You can apply the advice in this article to the conclusion, results or discussion sections of your manuscript.

Our Early Career Researcher community tells us that the conclusion is often considered the most difficult aspect of a manuscript to write. To help, this guide provides questions to ask yourself, a basic structure to model your discussion off of and examples from published manuscripts. 

write good lab conclusion

Questions to ask yourself:

  • Was my hypothesis correct?
  • If my hypothesis is partially correct or entirely different, what can be learned from the results? 
  • How do the conclusions reshape or add onto the existing knowledge in the field? What does previous research say about the topic? 
  • Why are the results important or relevant to your audience? Do they add further evidence to a scientific consensus or disprove prior studies? 
  • How can future research build on these observations? What are the key experiments that must be done? 
  • What is the “take-home” message you want your reader to leave with?

How to structure a discussion

Trying to fit a complete discussion into a single paragraph can add unnecessary stress to the writing process. If possible, you’ll want to give yourself two or three paragraphs to give the reader a comprehensive understanding of your study as a whole. Here’s one way to structure an effective discussion:

write good lab conclusion

Writing Tips

While the above sections can help you brainstorm and structure your discussion, there are many common mistakes that writers revert to when having difficulties with their paper. Writing a discussion can be a delicate balance between summarizing your results, providing proper context for your research and avoiding introducing new information. Remember that your paper should be both confident and honest about the results! 

What to do

  • Read the journal’s guidelines on the discussion and conclusion sections. If possible, learn about the guidelines before writing the discussion to ensure you’re writing to meet their expectations. 
  • Begin with a clear statement of the principal findings. This will reinforce the main take-away for the reader and set up the rest of the discussion. 
  • Explain why the outcomes of your study are important to the reader. Discuss the implications of your findings realistically based on previous literature, highlighting both the strengths and limitations of the research. 
  • State whether the results prove or disprove your hypothesis. If your hypothesis was disproved, what might be the reasons? 
  • Introduce new or expanded ways to think about the research question. Indicate what next steps can be taken to further pursue any unresolved questions. 
  • If dealing with a contemporary or ongoing problem, such as climate change, discuss possible consequences if the problem is avoided. 
  • Be concise. Adding unnecessary detail can distract from the main findings. 

What not to do

Don’t

  • Rewrite your abstract. Statements with “we investigated” or “we studied” generally do not belong in the discussion. 
  • Include new arguments or evidence not previously discussed. Necessary information and evidence should be introduced in the main body of the paper. 
  • Apologize. Even if your research contains significant limitations, don’t undermine your authority by including statements that doubt your methodology or execution. 
  • Shy away from speaking on limitations or negative results. Including limitations and negative results will give readers a complete understanding of the presented research. Potential limitations include sources of potential bias, threats to internal or external validity, barriers to implementing an intervention and other issues inherent to the study design. 
  • Overstate the importance of your findings. Making grand statements about how a study will fully resolve large questions can lead readers to doubt the success of the research. 

Snippets of Effective Discussions:

Consumer-based actions to reduce plastic pollution in rivers: A multi-criteria decision analysis approach

Identifying reliable indicators of fitness in polar bears

  • How to Write a Great Title
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write good lab conclusion

1. Start by restating the purpose of the experiment:

A good lab conclusion starts with a clear and concise restatement of the purpose of the experiment. This helps the reader to quickly understand what the experiment was about and how it connects to your results.

2. Summarize your observations and results:

In this section, you should provide a brief summary of the main observations and results obtained from your experiment. Use clear language and avoid going into too much detail on every experimental step.

Focus on the most important findings, highlight trends or patterns, and draw attention to any anomalies.

3. Compare your results with initial predictions or hypotheses:

Next, it’s essential to compare your results with any initial predictions or hypotheses that might have been made before the experiment took place. Discuss whether your observations are consistent with these predictions, and if not, provide an explanation for any discrepancies that may have occurred. This is important because it shows how well you understood your experimental design, as well as providing an opportunity for critical thinking about why certain outcomes were observed.

4. Identify potential sources of error:

A good lab conclusion acknowledges potential limitations or sources of error that may have affected the outcome of the experiment. Identifying these can help you improve upon future experiments and further hone your scientific skills. Also, mentioning these sources demonstrates that you are aware that experiments are not always perfect, which shows humility and improves credibility.

5. Suggest improvements or future research opportunities:

Finally, after analyzing your results and considering potential sources of error, suggest improvements that could be made to refine this experiment or future studies addressing similar questions. This can include changes to the experimental design, more rigorous controls, or new research questions that arose from your findings. Providing well-thought-out suggestions shows readers that you have carefully considered the implications of your study and demonstrates engagement with the scientific process beyond just analysis.

By following these five steps, you will be well on your way to crafting a clear, relevant, and comprehensive lab conclusion. Always remember that a good lab conclusion effectively communicates your findings and situates them within the broader scientific context.

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Lab Report Conclusion: What Is It And How To Write It?

How To Write A Lab Report Conclusion

The lab result conclusion is the final chapter in a lab report document. It is the summary of the studied objectives, validated hypothesis, an experiment undertaken, discussion, results, errors, uncertainties, and the outcomes.

How to Write a Lab Report Conclusion

Do you know how to write a professional conclusion for a lab report? A lab report describes a complete experiment from start to finish, hypothesis, procedures, results, and analyzed data. The report shows what has been learned and provides a great overview of the whole lab research.

The conclusion is an important part that summarizes the whole lab report. This gives the main findings, provides an overview of the lab research, and the achieved objectives. If the reader just reads the introduction and conclusion, they should be able to understand the whole lab experiment fully without reading the main lab report chapters.

It is important to know the lab report structure for better readability by the target readers. This is vital for Chemistry, Biology, and Physics basic lab reports.

How Long Should A Lab Report Conclusion Be?

It should be brief, as long it covers all that is in the main body of the lab experiment result. The length of the conclusion is predetermined by the length of the whole lab report. If you have a lot of information, the conclusion may end up being a bit longer than expected.

What is the difference between a conclusion and a discussion?

A conclusion is the summary of the general lab result while a discussion gives a broader overview of the lab result. In the discussion, you can provide all the raw data gotten if you experimented a couple of times. However, when it comes to writing the conclusion, you just need to write the exact values.

A lab result conclusion should:

Answer the lab experiment questions – A lab result shows what was concluded after experimenting. At the start of the experiment, there were questions to be answered, hence the conclusion part provides the answers. This is especially vital for University students who are doing their assignments with deadlines. Summarize the lab experiment – This section is where you provide a summary of the whole lab experiment. This is by highlighting the major components, findings, errors, and uncertainties. Draw the main recommendations – This section should have the recommendations that need to be adhered to after the results are gotten. In addition, demonstrate the contribution you have made in terms of the impact the lab result will have.

Let’s say our topic was based on: Determination of the Level of nitrate content in food.

Step 1: Make a summary in your lab report conclusion

By the time you reach this section, you should have a proper understanding of the topic. You need to have already verified the topic objectives of the experiment and come to a genuine conclusion.

  • Outline the conclusion

Go over your assignment fully, validate or refute your hypothesis, and verify that you have accomplished all the sections of the assignment.

On the side make a shortlist of all the findings in your experiment and plan how you are going to summarize them in your lab test conclusion.

For example, in the different types of food, what was the nitrate content? Is the nitrate composition in the food almost similar?

Your conclusion should be consistent with the rest of your lab report. Hence read your introduction to see what you were anticipating to get at the end of the experiment.

For example, in the introduction, you had stated the different food samples that you had and you wanted to get the composition of nitrate in all of them. Hence, in the conclusion, cover this and provide answers.

The conclusion should work as an answer to all the questions you had while writing the introduction.

  • Use the Re-run method

The re-run method means to restate, explain, provide results, uncertainties, and new concepts. This is an easy structure that will help you review the experiment’s important elements.

In restating, you describe the lab experiment in depth. In explaining, show the vivid purposes of the lab experiment. Basically, what were you trying to find out? Provide the procedure that you followed to get the results of the lab experiment.

In the introduction, you mentioned some uncertainties that may be there. Hence, in the conclusion part, account for all the uncertainties and errors that were there.

These are the circumstances that were beyond your control when performing the lab experiment. Discuss the new questions or concepts that emerged in the experiment.

For example: While testing did you get the carbon composition in the food? What other element did you note? Do you think that how long the food had stayed had an impact on the outcome? These are some questions you can ask yourself based on your research topic.
  • Plan other sections to add

While ending the conclusion, remember to add what you have learned in the lab experiment. In this way, you can relate the findings with your knowledge.

Step 2: Discuss the Experiment and hypothesis in the lab report conclusion

Introduce the experiment and hypothesis in your conclusion.

  • Discuss the experiment

Provide a brief overview of the experiment you did in like 1-2 sentences. Remember to include the objective of the experiment. This is with the independent and dependent variables.

Give a short briefing of the process you went through in experimenting. This will help the reader visualize what you did.

In the case that you experimented more than once, explain the reasons why and the changes you noted in the different times.

For example, The experiment was done thrice to validate the results.

In few words, explain and summarize the results you came up with. Then give averages of the range of data that you got. This helps provide an overall picture to the reader.

For example, The overall results showed that 70% of food samples A, B, and C had nitrate composition. Sample A had 70%, B had 67% and C had 73%.

The discussion chapter should have all the raw data. Remember to show whether the statistical analysis was significant in any way.

  • Discuss the hypothesis

While on it, describe whether the hypothesis is supported. The hypothesis is what drives the experiment to be done. Hence verify or refute the hypothesis for a clearer understanding. Say clearly whether the experiment supported the hypothesis.

It should be simple like; “the results supported the hypothesis that …” or the results didn’t support the hypothesis that….

Make sure to link your results to the hypothesis to bring a clearer picture. Then comment further to explain the hypothesis.

Step 3: Explain what you have learned in the lab experiment

After doing the lab experiment you must have learned something new. Hence, mention what you have learned after experimenting.

You can describe it like, During the lab experiment, I learned that…

The reader will be able to easily understand what you are bringing forward. Explain what you learned and how you learned it. This shows that even though you were to follow a certain pattern, you followed another one to back up the results. This will make the reader understand better. Explain how what you learned can be applied in future experiments.

Give specifics of what you learned. For example, A new concept learnt was that nitrate is present ….

Remember to answer the specific question that had been asked in the assignment. The major thing is finding an answer to the given question. If it was homework, write in italics the question, then in regular text your answer

For example: Is there any nitrate content in food. Answer: The nitrate content in food is ….

Step 4: End the lab report conclusion

Describe any possible errors you may have encountered that may have hindered accurate results. This will help provide more transparency in your lab result.

In addition, talk about the uncertainties and the overall impact of the experiment. Remember to propose future experiments that can be done. This is like recommendations to get a deeper understating of the specific subject. You can provide other questions that can be used for further experiments.

If possible, try and relate your research to other previously done research. This is mostly for more advanced lab results. Try and describe what is unique about your research. Use one final statement to finalize your basic lab report conclusion. One that can describe the whole process.

Find It Difficult To Write Lab Report Conclusion?

Remember when writing your lab report conclusion to write in the third person. Read through the whole basic lab report to validate your findings and the facts that you have ascertained.

Try to correct contradicting parts and ensure there is a smooth flow of ideas. Proofread your lab report fully to ensure there is no gap or hanging point.

Make it the best of all while using the best grammar. Try to show the significance of your lab report to the world. That’s vital for a science experiment report.

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write good lab conclusion

How to Write a Conclusion for a Lab Report?

Many people lack writing experience in order to perform some written tasks. This especially applies to those who major in some sciences like chemistry, physics, biology or similar – they just have a different set of mind. The problem arises when these people attend a university. It is not a secret that a large number of academic papers are essential components of the educational process, which means that there is no way one can avoid writing papers for college. And even a bigger problem arises when a student has to perform such a complex task as a laboratory project, which requires not only in-depth comprehension of a specific topic and subject in general but also some good writing skills and experience. That’s when many students face issues.

Luckily, there are no things that a person couldn’t master with a bit of persistence, practice, time, and lots of motivation, which means that even if you have encounter problems with this task, there is still a way to handle it and we will tell you how! However, if you feel like you need someone to write my lab report , professional help is always available. You can hire a site that writes essays for you. They will help you with any coursework help you need. Read further to know how to master this by yourself. However, if you feel like you need someone to write my lab report, professional help is always available. You can hire a writer on the site that writes essays for you . They will help you with any coursework help you need. Read further to know how to master this by yourself.

What Is A Lab Report?

The purpose of a lab report is to describe in detail an entire experiment from start to finish. This involves writing out procedures, reporting results and analyzing your data. A lab report is a good indicator of your understanding of an experiment and what you have learned from it; therefore, it is highly important that it is performed to the highest standard. Here  are some good examples.

Lab work conclusion is an indispensable part of a report: it restates the experiment’s main findings and provides the reader with an overview of the work you have done. Just like a good conclusion for a research paper  by writing a strong conclusion to a lab project you will convey to the reader that you have the learned the objectives of your assignment and feel comfortable enough to repeat it, if necessary.

Lab Report Conclusion Outline

There are four easy steps to do. They will enable you to create a lab report conclusion outline. Go through your assignment once again and make sure that you have covered all the necessary parts of your experiment and documented them. This way you will be able to address them easily in your conclusion. If you haven’t already made a list of experiment objectives, do it at this stage.

Return to your introduction to make sure your conclusion of a lab report is consistent with it – it may also help you formulate what you are going to state there.

Having done that use the RERUN method. It should help you map out all the necessary elements of a conclusion. RERUN stands for:

  • Restate (describe an assignment);
  • Explain (explain your purpose and briefly describe a procedure);
  • Results (explain and confirm whether the hypothesis was supported by them);
  • Uncertainties (account for uncertainties and errors beyond control);
  • New (questions or discoveries that emerged from your experiment).

Apart from using RERUN method, check if there is anything you have learned from the experiment? Relate the research to the subject and other concepts you have learned in class and make sure you have addressed all questions in your assignment. If you need any help with your thesis, you can hire someone to write my thesis . Our experts can help you with your academic writing needs. You can check out our service and buy a research proposal too. Some more information can be found here .

Lab Report Conclusion Example

There is not a single foolproof way of writing a conclusion in lab report. There are many approaches that can point you in the right direction. Feel free to use this lab report writing guide . Alternatively, take a look at this example of a lab report conclusion for the following experiment:

Experiment goal: To create the best environment for fish in the aquarium

The aim is to work out a relationship between the water’s temperature and the amount of oxygen dissolved in it (to find the optimal temperature to provide more oxygen for fish in the water). An experiment is set up. Ice and a hot plate are used to alter temperature of water. The amount of dissolved oxygen present in the sample of water is then measured (using a chemical set).

Hypothesis : Oxygen levels decrease as the temperature water is increased. Conclusion paragraph : The purpose of this experiment was to measure the effect of altering water temperature on the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water. The graph shows such results. The coldest temperature water contained most oxygen in it – about 6.3 mg / L at 10°C; the warmest temperature water contained least oxygen in it – about 4.9 mg/L at 30°C. The trend seems to be linear – as the temperature is increased, the amount of available oxygen decreases. This data supports the original hypothesis. In this work, it was difficult to maintain a stable temperature long enough to test it accurately (the water rapidly warmed up as one went through the oxygen testing procedure). Perhaps future tests could be done more quickly to prevent temperature changes and minimize error. Future experiments could test for other factors that can affect oxygen levels in water. The assumption is that adding plants to the aquarium could affect oxygen levels (when they photosynthesize).

This above example is a basic high school trial. But pay heed to how all necessary information regarding the experiment is neatly presented. It is done in such a way that the reader gets a clear understanding of the concept even without reading the rest of the lab report and without being a scientist. This  resource includes another sample lab report.

Just a few final tips left to share with you: write your paper in the third person, avoid using “I” or “we”. Once you have completed your work, read through it again checking for any inconsistencies. Make sure you don’t contradict yourself and your conclusion reiterates what you have learned from the experiment – show you understand your topic! On your final reading proofread your writing to avoid any grammatical or spelling errors that could lower your overall grade.

We hope all above information will help you produce your perfect paper. However, you can also use a professional lab report writing service  which is guaranteed to get you a top grade in your discipline.

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The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Conclusions

What this handout is about.

This handout will explain the functions of conclusions, offer strategies for writing effective ones, help you evaluate conclusions you’ve drafted, and suggest approaches to avoid.

About conclusions

Introductions and conclusions can be difficult to write, but they’re worth investing time in. They can have a significant influence on a reader’s experience of your paper.

Just as your introduction acts as a bridge that transports your readers from their own lives into the “place” of your analysis, your conclusion can provide a bridge to help your readers make the transition back to their daily lives. Such a conclusion will help them see why all your analysis and information should matter to them after they put the paper down.

Your conclusion is your chance to have the last word on the subject. The conclusion allows you to have the final say on the issues you have raised in your paper, to synthesize your thoughts, to demonstrate the importance of your ideas, and to propel your reader to a new view of the subject. It is also your opportunity to make a good final impression and to end on a positive note.

Your conclusion can go beyond the confines of the assignment. The conclusion pushes beyond the boundaries of the prompt and allows you to consider broader issues, make new connections, and elaborate on the significance of your findings.

Your conclusion should make your readers glad they read your paper. Your conclusion gives your reader something to take away that will help them see things differently or appreciate your topic in personally relevant ways. It can suggest broader implications that will not only interest your reader, but also enrich your reader’s life in some way. It is your gift to the reader.

Strategies for writing an effective conclusion

One or more of the following strategies may help you write an effective conclusion:

  • Play the “So What” Game. If you’re stuck and feel like your conclusion isn’t saying anything new or interesting, ask a friend to read it with you. Whenever you make a statement from your conclusion, ask the friend to say, “So what?” or “Why should anybody care?” Then ponder that question and answer it. Here’s how it might go: You: Basically, I’m just saying that education was important to Douglass. Friend: So what? You: Well, it was important because it was a key to him feeling like a free and equal citizen. Friend: Why should anybody care? You: That’s important because plantation owners tried to keep slaves from being educated so that they could maintain control. When Douglass obtained an education, he undermined that control personally. You can also use this strategy on your own, asking yourself “So What?” as you develop your ideas or your draft.
  • Return to the theme or themes in the introduction. This strategy brings the reader full circle. For example, if you begin by describing a scenario, you can end with the same scenario as proof that your essay is helpful in creating a new understanding. You may also refer to the introductory paragraph by using key words or parallel concepts and images that you also used in the introduction.
  • Synthesize, don’t summarize. Include a brief summary of the paper’s main points, but don’t simply repeat things that were in your paper. Instead, show your reader how the points you made and the support and examples you used fit together. Pull it all together.
  • Include a provocative insight or quotation from the research or reading you did for your paper.
  • Propose a course of action, a solution to an issue, or questions for further study. This can redirect your reader’s thought process and help her to apply your info and ideas to her own life or to see the broader implications.
  • Point to broader implications. For example, if your paper examines the Greensboro sit-ins or another event in the Civil Rights Movement, you could point out its impact on the Civil Rights Movement as a whole. A paper about the style of writer Virginia Woolf could point to her influence on other writers or on later feminists.

Strategies to avoid

  • Beginning with an unnecessary, overused phrase such as “in conclusion,” “in summary,” or “in closing.” Although these phrases can work in speeches, they come across as wooden and trite in writing.
  • Stating the thesis for the very first time in the conclusion.
  • Introducing a new idea or subtopic in your conclusion.
  • Ending with a rephrased thesis statement without any substantive changes.
  • Making sentimental, emotional appeals that are out of character with the rest of an analytical paper.
  • Including evidence (quotations, statistics, etc.) that should be in the body of the paper.

Four kinds of ineffective conclusions

  • The “That’s My Story and I’m Sticking to It” Conclusion. This conclusion just restates the thesis and is usually painfully short. It does not push the ideas forward. People write this kind of conclusion when they can’t think of anything else to say. Example: In conclusion, Frederick Douglass was, as we have seen, a pioneer in American education, proving that education was a major force for social change with regard to slavery.
  • The “Sherlock Holmes” Conclusion. Sometimes writers will state the thesis for the very first time in the conclusion. You might be tempted to use this strategy if you don’t want to give everything away too early in your paper. You may think it would be more dramatic to keep the reader in the dark until the end and then “wow” him with your main idea, as in a Sherlock Holmes mystery. The reader, however, does not expect a mystery, but an analytical discussion of your topic in an academic style, with the main argument (thesis) stated up front. Example: (After a paper that lists numerous incidents from the book but never says what these incidents reveal about Douglass and his views on education): So, as the evidence above demonstrates, Douglass saw education as a way to undermine the slaveholders’ power and also an important step toward freedom.
  • The “America the Beautiful”/”I Am Woman”/”We Shall Overcome” Conclusion. This kind of conclusion usually draws on emotion to make its appeal, but while this emotion and even sentimentality may be very heartfelt, it is usually out of character with the rest of an analytical paper. A more sophisticated commentary, rather than emotional praise, would be a more fitting tribute to the topic. Example: Because of the efforts of fine Americans like Frederick Douglass, countless others have seen the shining beacon of light that is education. His example was a torch that lit the way for others. Frederick Douglass was truly an American hero.
  • The “Grab Bag” Conclusion. This kind of conclusion includes extra information that the writer found or thought of but couldn’t integrate into the main paper. You may find it hard to leave out details that you discovered after hours of research and thought, but adding random facts and bits of evidence at the end of an otherwise-well-organized essay can just create confusion. Example: In addition to being an educational pioneer, Frederick Douglass provides an interesting case study for masculinity in the American South. He also offers historians an interesting glimpse into slave resistance when he confronts Covey, the overseer. His relationships with female relatives reveal the importance of family in the slave community.

Works consulted

We consulted these works while writing this handout. This is not a comprehensive list of resources on the handout’s topic, and we encourage you to do your own research to find additional publications. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For guidance on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial . We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback.

Douglass, Frederick. 1995. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself. New York: Dover.

Hamilton College. n.d. “Conclusions.” Writing Center. Accessed June 14, 2019. https://www.hamilton.edu//academics/centers/writing/writing-resources/conclusions .

Holewa, Randa. 2004. “Strategies for Writing a Conclusion.” LEO: Literacy Education Online. Last updated February 19, 2004. https://leo.stcloudstate.edu/acadwrite/conclude.html.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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How to Write a Good Lab Conclusion in Science

Ultimate Updated: Joann 4, 2023 Fact Checked

This piece was co-authored by Bess Ruff, MA . Bess Ruff is a Geography PhD student at Florida State University. She maintain her MA in Environmental Science and Verwaltung from the University are Kalifornian, Santa Barbara are 2016. Her has carry survey work for ship spatial planners projects in the Caribbean and provided research support as a graduate fellow for an Sustainable Fisheries Group. There been 11 references cited in this article, which can may found among the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of all cited fakt and confirming the authority of its sources. This browse has has viewed 1,751,362 times.

A lab report describes an entire experiment from launch to finish, outlining the procedures, reporting results, and analyzing data. The report is used to demonstrate what has been learned, and it will provide a way since other people to see your operation for the experiment and understand like you happened at your conclusions. The conclusion is a integral part in the report; this is the kapitel which reiterates the experiment’s haupt- findings and gives the lecturer certain overview of the lab trial. Writing a solid conclusion to your lab report will exhibit that you’ve effectively learnt the objectives of your assignment. How the Write Debates and Conclusions - PLOS

Delineate The Conclusion

Step 1 Go over get assignment.

  • Restate : Retell the lab testing by describing the assignment.
  • Describe : Explain and purpose of that lab experiment. What were you trying to figure out or discover? Talk briefly about the procedure yourself followed to complete the lab.
  • Erreichte : Explained your results. Confirm if or not your hypothesis became supported over the results.
  • Uncertain : Account for uncertainties and errors. Explain, for example, if there were other condition beyond your control that might have hit the experiment’s earnings.
  • Brand : Discuss new questions or discoveries that emerged by the experiment.

Step 4 Blueprint other sections to add.

  • Your assignments may also have specialty questions that need to be answered. Make sure you answer these solid and coherently in your conclusion.

Discus the Try and Your

Step 1 Introduce the experiment in your conclusion.

  • If you tried the experiment further than once, describe the reasons forward doing so. Decide modifications that you made on your procedures.
  • Brainstorm ways to explain your results inbound more depth. Start support through your label notes, paying particular attention to the results you observed. [5] X Trustworthy Source Academy von Norther Carolina Writing Center UNC's on-campus and online educative service that supports assistance to students, faculty, or others during which script process Go to source

Step 3 Describe what you discovered concisely.

  • Starts this section with wording such as, “The results showed that…”
  • Your don’t need up enter the roh data here. Just shorten the main points, calculate averages, or give a range of data to give an overall picture to the reader.
  • Create sure to define whether or not any statistical analyzes have significant, additionally to what end, such more 1%, 5%, or 10%.

Step 4 Comment on whether or not your hypothesis is supported.

  • Use easy language how as, “The results based the hypothesis,” or “The results did did support the hypothesis.”

Step 5 Connection your end to your hypothesis.

Demonstrating What You Have Learning

Step 1 Describe what it taught in the lab.

  • If it’s not clear in your conclusion what you learned from the lab, start off by writing, “In this lab, I learned…” This will give the reader a heads up that your will to describing exactly what you learned.
  • Add details about what you learned and how you learned it. Adding size to your learning outcomes will convince your reader that him did, in fact, learn from the lab. Give specifics about as you learned that fluorescence will act in one particular environment, for example. Although writing a conclusion you should: short restate which end of the experiment (i.e. the question it was seeking toward answer); identify of main findings ...
  • Describe how what you learned in the lab could be applied for a future experiment.

Step 2 Rejoin specific questions given in the assignment.

  • On an modern line, write the question in italian. On which next line, write the answer to this question in regular text.

Step 3 Explain whether you achieved aforementioned experiment’s objectives.

  • If your learn did doesn achieve the objectives, explain or speculate why not.

Wrapping Back Your Conclusion

Step 1 Describe possible errors that may have occurred.

  • If respective experiment raised questions that your collected intelligence can’t answer, discuss this go.

Step 3 Suggest future experiments.

  • Describe what is new or innovative about your research.
  • This can often firm you apart from your classmates, many of choose will simple write up the barest of view and conclusion.

Walk 6 Add a final statement.

Finalizing Respective Research Report

Step 1 Write by that third person.

Community Q&A

wikiHow Staff Editor

  • If you include figures or tables in your conclusion, be securely to include a brief captions or tags so so the reader knows what of figures refer to. Also, discussion the figures briefly into the text of your report. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Once again, try after personalbestand pronouns (I, myself, we, our group) in a laboratory report. The first-person point-of-view is often seen as subjective, when science is based to detachment. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Ensure the language used is straightforward with specific see. Try not to drift away topic. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

write good lab conclusion

  • Take care with write own lab report when jobs in a team setting. When the lab test may be a cooperative effort, your lab report is your own labour. Are you copy divisions free send else’s report, this will be considered plagiarization. Thanks Helpful 3 Not Helpful 0

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  • ↑ https://phoenixcollege.libguides.com/LabReportWriting/introduction
  • ↑ https://www.hcs-k12.org/userfiles/354/Classes/18203/conclusionwriting.pdf
  • ↑ https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/discipline/english/literacy/Pages/puttingittogether.aspx
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/brainstorming/
  • ↑ https://advice.writing.utoronto.ca/types-of-writing/lab-report/
  • ↑ http://www.socialresearchmethods.net/kb/hypothes.php
  • ↑ https://libguides.usc.edu/writingguide/conclusion
  • ↑ https://libguides.usc.edu/writingguide/introduction/researchproblem
  • ↑ http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/scientific-reports/
  • ↑ https://phoenixcollege.libguides.com/LabReportWriting/labreportstyle
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/editing-and-proofreading/

About This Article

Bess Ruff, MA

To write a good lab conclusion in science, startup with restating to lab experiment by write the assignment. Next, explain whatever i be trying to explore with figure out with what the experiment. Then, list your results and explain how they confirmed or did not confirm your hypothesis. Additionally, include any uncertainties, such as circumstances beyond your control such may having involved the results. Finally, discuss any modern questions either revelations that emerged from the experiment. For more advice, included how to wrap up your lab report includes a final statement, keeping lies. Did this summary help you? Yes None

  • Send cooling dispatch to authors

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write good lab conclusion

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This resource outlines the generally accepted structure for introductions, body paragraphs, and conclusions in an academic argument paper. Keep in mind that this resource contains guidelines and not strict rules about organization. Your structure needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of your purpose and audience.

Conclusions wrap up what you have been discussing in your paper. After moving from general to specific information in the introduction and body paragraphs, your conclusion should begin pulling back into more general information that restates the main points of your argument. Conclusions may also call for action or overview future possible research. The following outline may help you conclude your paper:

In a general way,

  • Restate your topic and why it is important,
  • Restate your thesis/claim,
  • Address opposing viewpoints and explain why readers should align with your position,
  • Call for action or overview future research possibilities.

Remember that once you accomplish these tasks, unless otherwise directed by your instructor, you are finished. Done. Complete. Don't try to bring in new points or end with a whiz bang(!) conclusion or try to solve world hunger in the final sentence of your conclusion. Simplicity is best for a clear, convincing message.

The preacher's maxim is one of the most effective formulas to follow for argument papers:

Tell what you're going to tell them (introduction).

Tell them (body).

Tell them what you told them (conclusion).

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  1. 5 Ways to Write a Good Lab Conclusion in Science

    The conclusion is an integral part of the report; this is the section that reiterates the experiment's main findings and gives the reader an overview of the lab trial. Writing a solid conclusion to your lab report will demonstrate that you've effectively learned the objectives of your assignment. Claim Your Gift Support wikiHow

  2. How To Write A Lab Report

    Conclusion: sums up the main findings of your experiment References: list of all sources cited using a specific style (e.g. APA) Appendices: contains lengthy materials, procedures, tables or figures Although most lab reports contain these sections, some sections can be omitted or combined with others.

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    Order right now June 23, 2021 How to Write a Lab Report Conclusion Like other reports, without a conclusion, a lab report is incomplete. Conclusions are an integral part of lab reports and are fundamental to the demonstration of report objectives and reiteration of findings.

  4. How to Write a Conclusion for a Lab Report

    A lab report conclusion: Restates the objective of the experiment: A good way to begin a conclusion paragraph is to restate the purpose of or the objective of the experiment mentioned in the introduction part of the lab report. This should also include the main hypothesis .

  5. How to Write Discussions and Conclusions

    If possible, learn about the guidelines before writing the discussion to ensure you're writing to meet their expectations. Begin with a clear statement of the principal findings. This will reinforce the main take-away for the reader and set up the rest of the discussion. Explain why the outcomes of your study are important to the reader.

  6. 5 Roads toward Write a Good Lab Conclusion in Science

    1 Hinfahren over your assignment. Confirm that you've accomplished all the parts of your allocation so that you can properly address them in the conclusion. Take a few moments to make one list of what you're supposed to demonstrate or know in of experiment. 2 Return your introduction.

  7. 5 Ways to Write a Good Lab Conclusion in Science

    Spread the love1. Start by restating the purpose of the experiment: A good lab conclusion starts with a clear and concise restatement of the purpose of the experiment. This helps the reader to quickly understand what the experiment was about and how it connects to your results. 2. Summarize your observations and results: In this section, you should provide a brief summary of the main ...

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    Step 1: Make a summary in your lab report conclusion By the time you reach this section, you should have a proper understanding of the topic. You need to have already verified the topic objectives of the experiment and come to a genuine conclusion. Outline the conclusion

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  10. Conclusions

    The conclusion allows you to have the final say on the issues you have raised in your paper, to synthesize your thoughts, to demonstrate the importance of your ideas, and to propel your reader to a new view of the subject. It is also your opportunity to make a good final impression and to end on a positive note.

  11. How to Write a Good Conclusion For a Lab Report

    Elements of a Good Lab Report Conclusion. Stated below are the key elements of a proper conclusion for a lab report: 1. Reminder of Objectives and Research Purpose. In crafting an impactful conclusion for a lab report, it's essential to begin by revisiting the objectives outlined in the experiment. Remind readers of the initial goals that ...

  12. How to Write a Good Conclusion For a Lab Report

    As a rule, your conclusion part in a report should provide a clear and accessible summary of the experiment or research that has been presented in the previous paragraphs of your lab writing. It should not introduce anything new or explore ideas that have not been mentioned before.

  13. How to Write a Good Lab Conclusion in Science

    1 In over your assignment. Verify is you've accomplished all the parts of your assignment so that you can properly address diehards in that conclusion. Take a few moments to make a list to what you're hypothetical to demonstrate or hear in of learn. 2 Revisit your intro.

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  18. How to Write a Conclusion (With Tips and Examples)

    1. Restate the thesis. An effective conclusion brings the reader back to the main point, reminding the reader of the purpose of the essay. However, avoid repeating the thesis verbatim. Paraphrase your argument slightly while still preserving the primary point. 2. Reiterate supporting points.

  19. Conclusions

    Conclusions wrap up what you have been discussing in your paper. After moving from general to specific information in the introduction and body paragraphs, your conclusion should begin pulling back into more general information that restates the main points of your argument. Conclusions may also call for action or overview future possible research.

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