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Cover page of Architecture, a Technique of Environmental Governance

Architecture, a Technique of Environmental Governance

  • Fox, Gary Riichirō
  • Advisor(s): Lavin, Sylvia

This dissertation traces the emergence and development of the environmental-managerial project by which federal bureaucracy in the United States sought to administer the visual environment after about 1970. Although this effort relied on interdisciplinary practices and techniques, architects became principal actors in these workings of the administrative state: architects, initially, offered the projective visualization procedures through which state officials sought to account for environmental ‘degradation,’ but eventually, and perhaps more crucially, these practitioners laid out theoretical frameworks for the concept of the aesthetic which afforded a legally specified lens for assessing the value of particular environments. On one hand, the governmental strategies that transformed nuclear reactors, highways, strip mines, and other forms of environmental disturbance into phenomena that existed primarily on an optical register clearly belonged to a broader governmental strategy of pacification. On the other hand, turning to vocabularies and concepts traditionally rooted in the ineffable, subjective traditions of aesthetics and taste undermined the drive toward data management and quantified systems of accountability that otherwise characterized the operations of the administrative state. That the effort to reconcile these contradictions required recourse to a distinct array of art-historical, psychological, economic, and statistical procedures, often at odds with one another, reveals conceptual, procedural, and practical conflicts at the base of the managerial approach to the environment in the U.S., as well as the lasting infiltration of these systems into the self-redefinition of architecture as primarily a profession of image managers. Through examination of a wide range of archival sources, this dissertation attends closely to the mechanics of this historical development—the incremental processes of visualizing, psychologizing, quantifying, and projecting that constituted the chain of techniques by which the aesthetic came to be submitted to regimes of governance in the U.S., as well as their effects, intended and otherwise— which together operated to fabricate consensus around the increasingly unmanageable problem of the environment. It is this process of fabrication, the process by which the management of beauty came to constitute a powerful technique useful to “democracy,” that this dissertation traces.

Cover page of Movement of the People: Teacher Development in a Teacher-�led Inquiry Group and the Application of Teacher Generated Knowledge

Movement of the People: Teacher Development in a Teacher-�led Inquiry Group and the Application of Teacher Generated Knowledge

  • Martinez, Antonio Nieves
  • Advisor(s): Howard, Tyrone

In an attempt to identify ways to develop effective urban teachers, this study examined a grassroots form of teacher development. This year‑long study examined the efforts of a grassroots community based organization creating teachers‑led professional development for teachers. Teachers'ʹ perceptions were explored to understand how this approach to professional development impacted their pedagogy and the ways they believed they were able to more effectively serve their students. Utilizing critical pedagogy and postcolonial theory as analytic frames, this study deconstructed the complex process of teacher development in bi-�weekly inquiry group meetings. The findings from this research suggest that this teacher-�led inquiry group supported participants in developing the critical capacity to make sense of hegemonic discourses as they engaged in humanizing spaces for learning. Findings also reveal that participants leverage this teacher-�led space for learning to build their network of support and create curriculum that honored the lives and communities of Black and Latino students. The participants were a convenience sample of seven educators that voluntarily attended a bi-�monthly teacher-�led inquiry group during the 2012‑2013 school year, worked in public and charter schools in South Los Angeles, and taught across academic disciplines. This qualitative case study drew from ethnographic approaches relying on traditional data collection strategies such as field notes, a review of teachers' curriculum and other artifacts, and teacher interviews.

Thermal Transport in Heterogeneous Nanostructures

  • Advisor(s): Hu, Yongjie

Heterogeneous nanostructures involve nanoscale interfaces with different materials components, such as matrix and fillers in composites, stacking planer structures in electronics, and aggregates of nanomaterials. Thermal transport in heterogenous nanostructures is critical to the safety and performance of various applications ranging from high temperature turbines, microelectronics, solar cells, thermoelectrics, buildings’ thermal management and so on. However, it remains challenging to achieve rational control of the thermal properties in heterogeneous nanostructures due to limitations in current characterization techniques and fundamental understandings of interface thermal transport. My PhD research focuses on developing new thermal measurement techniques and investigating fundamental interface transport mechanisms through the combination of experiments and modeling, to provide rational control over heterogeneous nanostructures for better addressing practical heat management and energy conversion problems using nanoengineering. The study of thermal transport in heterogeneous nanostructures in my dissertation spans from technical development of new tools, experimental measurements at nanoscale interfaces and porous structures, and atomistic modelling of fundamental transport physics to practical device applications. First, I have developed a new metrology based on asymmetric beam time-domain thermoreflectance (AB-TDTR) that enables accurate measurements over three-dimensional thermal transport. Through the design of an asymmetric laser beam with controlled elliptical ratio and spot size, the experimental signals can be exploited to be dominantly sensitive to measure anisotropic thermal conductivity along the cross-plane or any specific in-plane directions. I have further applied this new approach to investigate anisotropic transport phenomena that enables unique applications. Second, I have explored the effects of crystal orientations and dipole-dipole interactions on interface thermal transport. In particular, for the first time, we have observed a record-high anisotropy ratio of 3.25 in the thermal boundary resistance across a prototype two-dimensional material, i.e., black phosphorus. Moreover, my study has resulted in the first observation of strong effects from long-range molecular dipole-dipole interactions on interface thermal transport. In addition, I have also investigated the heterogeneous integration of our recently developed new high thermal conductivity materials with prototyped high-power semiconductor, i.e., gallium nitride. Our in-situ measurement demonstrated substantially reduced hot-spot temperatures in devices using boron arsenide cooling substrates, beyond the best state-of-the-art HEMTs using diamond or silicon carbide. Lastly, I have investigated thermal transport in porous and mesoporous structures, including super-hydrophobic polymer aerogel, transparent mesoporous silica, and flexible tin selenide nanosheet films for applications in buildings, windows, and thermoelectric energy conversion.

Cover page of Tailoring the Magnetic and Magnetoelectric Properties of Nanostructured Materials Using Solution-Phase Methods

Tailoring the Magnetic and Magnetoelectric Properties of Nanostructured Materials Using Solution-Phase Methods

  • Robbennolt, Shauna
  • Advisor(s): Tolbert, Sarah H

Magnetic nanomaterials are an important and widely studied class of materials with a wide variety of applications. The work presented here is aimed at both developing techniques to control the nanoscale structure of these materials and understanding the relationship between that structure and the overall material properties. The techniques used here are primarily solution-phase methods which offer a high degree of control and versatility.

The first part of this work is focused on thin films of magnetic oxide materials which are particularly applicable to radio frequency (RF) devices. Here, both sol-gel and nanocrystal precursors are used to create thin films where the film composition, grain size and porosity are controllably tuned. We then investigated both the static and dynamic magnetic properties of the films to better understand how the nanoscale structure impacts the overall properties. These investigations provide valuable insights that can allow us to design materials with properties tailored to meet the requirements of individual devices. Importantly, these insights are applicable to a wide variety of magnetic materials and are not limited to the specific materials studied here.

The second part of this work is focused on metallic alloy nanocrystals which have potential applications as elements in high density data storage devices. First, in chapter 5, the magnetoelectric properties of FePd nanocrystals is investigated. FePd is a good candidate for use in magnetoelectric memory devices which are highly energy efficient. By using nanocrystals of FePd, we hope to find a route to potentially reducing bit size in those devices which can lead to increased data storage densities. Then, in chapter 6, we move on to explore shape effects by looking at FePt nanorods. FePt has a very high magnetic anisotropy which in memory devices translates to increased bit stability and potentially allows for smaller bit sizes. In nanorods, shape anisotropy can enhance the already high magnetic anisotropy to create even stronger nanomagnets.

Cover page of Optimization, Characterization and Commissioning of a Novel Uniform Scanning Proton Beam Delivery System

Optimization, Characterization and Commissioning of a Novel Uniform Scanning Proton Beam Delivery System

  • Mascia, Anthony Edward
  • Advisor(s): Low, Daniel

Purpose: To develop and characterize the required detectors for uniform scanning optimization and characterization, and to develop the methodology and assess their efficacy for optimizing, characterizing and commissioning a novel proton beam uniform scanning system.

Methods and Materials: The Multi Layer Ion Chamber (MLIC), a 1D array of vented parallel plate ion chambers, was developed in-house for measurement of longitudinal profiles. The Matrixx detector (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) and XOmat V film (Kodak, USA) were characterized for measurement of transverse profiles. The architecture of the uniform scanning system was developed and then optimized and characterized for clinical proton radiotherapy.

Results: The MLIC detector significantly increased data collection efficiency without sacrificing data quality. The MLIC was capable of integrating an entire scanned and layer stacked proton field with one measurement, producing results with the equivalent spatial sampling of 1.0mm. The Matrixx detector and modified 1D water phantom jig improved data acquisition efficiency and complemented the film measurements. The proximal, central and distal proton field planes

were measured using these methods, yielding better than 3% uniformity. The binary range modulator was programmed, optimized and characterized such that the proton field ranges were separated by approximately 5.0mm modulation width and delivered with an accuracy of 1.0mm in water. Several wobbling magnet scan patterns were evaluated and the raster pattern, spot spacing, scan amplitude and overscan margin were optimized for clinical use.

Conclusion: Novel detectors and methods are required for clinically efficient optimization and characterization of proton beam scanning systems. Uniform scanning produces proton beam fields that are suited for clinical proton radiotherapy.

Cover page of Predicting Musical Genres using Deep Learning and Ensembling

Predicting Musical Genres using Deep Learning and Ensembling

  • Sang, Andrew Minkyu
  • Advisor(s): Wu, Yingnian

Automatic Music Genre Classification is a core problem in the Music Information Retrieval space. The classification approach detailed in this paper involves: using musical features from the Million Song Dataset, augmenting the musical dataset with lyrics and cover art images, building a deep learning model for each of the three different types of inputs, and then ensembling the predictions from the individual models using a gradient boosted machine. Ensembling resulted in an 8.6% increase in F1 score over the best individual model while maintaining a similar level of accuracy. This framework may be successfully applied to other problems with multimodal inputs.

Cover page of Novel Coding Strategies for Multi-Level Non-Volatile Memories

Novel Coding Strategies for Multi-Level Non-Volatile Memories

  • Sala, Frederic
  • Advisor(s): Dolecek, Lara

Non-volatile memories (NVMs) are the most important modern data storage technology. Despite their significant advantages, NVMs suffer from poor reliability due to issues such as voltage drift over time, overwriting, and inter-cell coupling. This thesis applies coding-theoretic techniques to NVMs in order to improve their reliability and extend their lifetimes. In particular, we focus on two classes of problems: those related to the use of thresholds to read memory cells, and those related to inter-cell coupling in the data representation scheme known as rank modulation.

The first part of the thesis develops the concept of dynamic thresholds. In NVMs, reading stored data is typically done by comparing cell values against a set of predetermined, fixed threshold references. However, due to common NVM problems, fixed threshold usage often results in significant asymmetric errors. To combat these problems, the notion of dynamic thresholds was recently introduced. Such thresholds are allowed to change in order to react to changes in cell value distributions. Thus far, dynamic thresholds have been applied to the reading of binary sequences in memories with single-level cells (SLCs).

In this work, the use of dynamic thresholds for multi-level cell (MLC) memories is explored. A general scheme to compute and apply dynamic thresholds is provided. We derive a series of performance results, based on both practical considerations and theoretical analysis. We show that the proposed threshold scheme compares favorably with the best-possible threshold scheme. Finally, we develop error-correcting codes that are tailored to take advantage of the properties of dynamic thresholds. Code constructions are provided for different channel models, including those allowing limited and unlimited numbers of errors of varying magnitude limitations.

The second part of this thesis is focused on the application of constrained coding to rank modulation. Rank modulation is an MLC NVM scheme where information is represented by the rankings of charge levels in an entire block of cells, rather than the absolute charge level of any particular cell. This scheme resolves certain NVM problems, including write-asymmetry, as it allows for a transition from any information state to any other solely through the addition of charge to an appropriate subset of cells. However, the scheme still suffers from inter-cell coupling errors. Such errors are due to inadvertent charge level increases in cells whose neighboring cells have significantly larger levels.

We introduce constraints that mitigate the inter-cell coupling problem in rank modulation. These constraints typically limit the differences between the ranks of neighboring elements in a permutation, and thus limit the charge level differences between adjacent cells, reducing inter-cell coupling effects. In particular, we analyze the single neighbor k-constraint, where neighboring cells' ranks cannot differ by more than k. We provide the best-known bounds for the sizes of sets meeting this constraint, and, for certain cases where the parameter k involves a constant term, we derive exact expressions. We perform an asymptotic analysis. Lastly, we introduce an efficient scheme that allows us to systematically generate constrained permutations.

Cover page of Differences in perceptions of health care between Asian Americans and non-Hispanic whites on the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS®) Clinician and Group Adult Visit Survey 1.0.

Differences in perceptions of health care between Asian Americans and non-Hispanic whites on the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS®) Clinician and Group Adult Visit Survey 1.0.

  • Ahmedov, Mohirjon
  • Advisor(s): Hays, Ronald D

Racial/ethnic disparities in patient experiences are widely reported. Asian Americans (Asians) consistently report worse care experiences in the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS®) surveys than non-Hispanic whites (Whites). However, little is known whether these race/ethnic differences in reports and ratings are due to differences in care experiences or differential response tendencies.

This dissertation consists of three studies. The first study compares reports and ratings of care between Asians and Whites using ordinary least squares analyses. The second study evaluates whether the hypothesized factor structure underlying the scoring of the CAHPS survey is confirmed in the survey dataset using categorical confirmatory factor analytic models. The third paper evaluates measurement invariance between Asians and Whites using a multiple group confirmatory factor analysis. The dissertation uses the Clinician & Group CAHPS Adult Visit Surveys 1.0 data collected in 2011.

In the first study, Asians reported worse care experiences on access to care, office staff courtesy and helpfulness, rated their doctor lower and were less likely to recommend their doctor to family and friends than Whites. On physician communication, no significant difference was noted between Asians and Whites. The reported differences in care experiences between Asians and Whites are likely due to real racial/ethnic differences in care received rather than lack of measurement invariance. The study findings have several important policy implications and provide directions for future research. Quality improvement initiatives in primary care need to be tailored towards reducing racial/ethnic differences in care. Further research will be needed to understand what are the underlying reasons for differential care for Asians and Whites in ambulatory care.

Unveiling the Structure-performance Relationship of the Cathode and Anode Catalyst in Electrochemical Water-splitting

  • Liu, Haotian
  • Advisor(s): Huang, Yu

Carbon neutrality has been the most popular topic of the twenty-first century. Substitutingnon-sustainable fossil fuels with the cleaner energy source hydrogen is a viable strategy for reducing total carbon footprints, but the conventional method of hydrogen production is energy-intensive and polluting. Water electrolysis stands out among all hydrogen production methods due to its low instrumentation requirements and high efficiency. However, water electrolysis costs have yet to be reduced. By engineering the catalysts used at the cathode and anode, the focus of this thesis will be to improve the water electrolysis efficiency and material durability. In addition, corresponding theory is studied in order to reveal the structureperformance relationship of the catalyst, which provides perspective and theoretical support for the design of future catalysts.

In the first chapter, I will briefly describe the current status of global carbon production.The rationale for selecting water electrolysis is then presented, along with an overview of water electrolysis devices.

In the second chapter, I will describe our work (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2018, 140, 29, 9046–9050) on improving the performance of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) by applyingsurface engineering to PtNi alloy. Hydrogen holds the potential of replacing nonrenewable fossil fuel. Improving the efficiency of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is critical for environmental friendly hydrogen generation through electrochemical or photoelectrochemical water splitting. Here we report the surface-engineered PtNi-O nanoparticles with enriched NiO/PtNi interface on surface. Notably, PtNi-O/C showed a mass activity of 7.23 mA/μg at an overpotential of 70 mV, which is 7.9 times higher compared to that of the commercial Pt/C, representing the highest reported mass activity for HER in alkaline conditions. The HER overpotential can be lowered to 39.8 mV at 10 mA/cm2 when platinum loading was only 5.1 μgPt/cm2, showing exceptional HER efficiency. The performance improvement could be attributed to the successful creation of Ni(OH)2/Pt(111) interface. Ni(OH)2 facilitated H2O molecule to be adsorbed on the surface as the first step of HER, and then recombination on the Pt(111) surface happened. Thus, the overall potential needed was decreased. Meanwhile, the prepared PtNi-O/C nanostructures demonstrated significantly improved stability as well as high current performance which are well over those of the commercial Pt/C and demonstrated capability of scaled hydrogen generation.

In the third chapter, I will demonstrate continuation of the last work, which is furtherimproving the alkaline HER performance on Pt-based alloy. Lattice tuning is one of the effective ways to optimize the HER performance on Pt-based alloy. Here, we report a facile lattice tuning method on Pt-based alloy using Cu addition to control the lattice parameter for optimal HER performacne. During the performance evaluation, PtCuNi/C and PtCuNi- O/C showed an average overpotential of 38.8 mV and 31.3 mV at 10 mA/cm2, respectively. The overpotential of PtCuNi-O/C is dramatically smaller than that of commercial Pt/C (115.2 mV). At an overpotential of 70 mV (-70 mV vs. RHE), the octahedral PtCuNi/C presents a mass activity (MA) of 4.9 mA/μgPt, while the PtCuNi-O/C demonstrates a MA of 8.7 mA/μgPt, which is nearly 9.5 folds to that of the commercial Pt/C (0.92 mA/μgPt). Also, the PtCuNi-O/C can reach a current density of 114 mA/cm2 at -0.2 V vs. RHE without iR compensation, which is well above that of Pt/C (22.4 mA/cm2), indicating a promising potential for the industrial scale hydrogen production. For the stability test, in contrast to the 160.1 mV potential drop for the Pt/C, there was only 55.5 mV, 48.2 mV potential drop for octahedral PtCuNi/C, PtCuNi-O/C, correspondingly, showing a significantly improved durability. Moreover, the dealloyed nanocatalysts showed the best performance when the lattice parameter is in the range of 0.3825-0.3835 nm for both PtNi-O/C and PtCuNi-O/C. In the fourth chapter, the main focus will be on the anode side featuring oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in acidic media. Developing durable non-precious catalysts for the acidic OER is crucial for the hydrogen production industry. In this regard, we report a facile strategy to synthesize the cobalt-based spinel oxide for the acidic OER with ultrahigh activity and outstanding durability. Specifically, the as-prepared NiCo2O4 delivered a low overpotential of 407 mV vs. reversible hydrogen electrode at 100 mA/cm2 and only a 68.9 mV increase at 10 mA/cm2 after 20 hours of chronopotentiometry test. Ex situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies revealed that Ni mainly occupies the octahedral site. In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies demonstrated that adding Ni helped minimize the structure change during the OER, leading to NiCo2O4’s outstanding durability. Density functional theory calculations demonstrated that the OER overpotential is lowered by 90 mV on the NiCo2O4 surface compared to that of Co3O4. The acidic OER on the NiCo2O4 spinel structure undergoes a kinetically more favorable direct O-O coupling mechanism rather than the adsorbate evolution mechanism, which was seldom reported regarding acidic OER on non-precious metal oxides. We showcase an ideal way to produce cobalt-based spinel oxides following direct O-O coupling mechanism design rules, achieving promising acidic OER performance cost-effectively.

The last chapter generally conclude the content covered in the thesis and provided someperspective on future catalyst design and scale-up applications.

Cover page of Analysis of Existing Severity Scores and Development of New Models for Hospital Mortality Prediction

Analysis of Existing Severity Scores and Development of New Models for Hospital Mortality Prediction

  • Baden, Lucy Marie
  • Advisor(s): Paik Schoenberg, Frederic R

Severity scoring systems are frequently used in hospital intensive care units to assess patient wellness and mortality probability. Accurate mortality predictions are vital to provide appropriate and timely treatments to critical patients. However, commonly used severity scores have been found to make inaccurate mortality predictions. In this paper, we assess and compare four popular severity scores for both discrimination and calibration. We apply logistic regression, random forest, and neural network classification techniques in order to present new mortality prediction models, and compare their performance with pre-existing scores. We also compare the use of a basic set of predictor features that can be easily collected in the ICU environment with an expanded predictor set including laboratory diagnostics. Newly developed models improved on existing severity scores in terms of discrimination, with random forest providing the best results, but often demonstrated poor calibration. The expanded variable set did not improve model performance.

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Home » For Authors & Researchers » Open Access Theses & Dissertations

Open Access Theses & Dissertations

1. Does UC require me to make my thesis/dissertation open access? 2. Can I delay open access to my thesis? 3. I’m working on my thesis/dissertation and I have copyright questions. Where can I find answers? 4. Where can I find UC Theses and Dissertations online?

1. Does UC require me to make my thesis/dissertation open access?

Several UC campuses have established policies requiring open access to the electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) written by their graduate students. As of March 25, 2020, there is now a systemwide Policy on Open Access for Theses and Dissertations , indicating that UC “requires theses or dissertations prepared at the University to be (1) deposited into an open access repository, and (2) freely and openly available to the public, subject to a requested delay of access (’embargo’) obtained by the student.”

In accordance with these policies, campuses must ensure that student ETDs are available open access via eScholarship (UC’s open access repository and publishing platform), at no cost to students. By contrast, ProQuest, the world’s largest commercial publisher of ETDs, charges a $95 fee to make an ETD open access. Institutions worldwide have moved toward open access ETD publication because it dramatically increases the visibility and reach of their graduate research.

Policies and procedures for ETD filing, including how to delay public release of an ETD and how long such a delay can last, vary by campus. Learn more :

  • UC Berkeley: Dissertation Filing Guidelines (for Doctoral Students) and Thesis Filing Guidelines (for Master’s Students)
  • UC Davis: Preparing and Filing Your Thesis or Dissertation
  • UC Irvine: Thesis/Dissertation Electronic Submission
  • UCLA: File Your Thesis or Dissertation
  • UC Merced: Dissertation/Thesis Submission
  • UC Riverside: Dissertation and Thesis Submission
  • UC San Diego:  Preparing to Graduate
  • UCSF: Dissertation and Thesis Guidelines
  • UC Santa Barbara:  Filing Your Thesis, Dissertation, or DMA Supporting Document
  • UC Santa Cruz: Dissertation and Thesis Guidelines (PDF) from the Graduate Division’s Accessing Forms Online page

2. Can I delay open access to my thesis/dissertation?

Some campuses allow students to elect an embargo period before the public release of their thesis/dissertation; others require approval from graduate advisors or administrators. Visit your local graduate division’s website (linked above) for more information.

In 2013, the American Historical Association released a statement calling for graduate programs to adopt policies for up to a six year embargo for history dissertations. Many scholars found this extreme, and a variety of commentators weighed in (see, e.g., discussions in The Atlantic , The Chronicle of Higher Education , and Inside Higher Ed ).  In addition, a memo from Rosemary Joyce, the Associate Dean of the Graduate Division of UC Berkeley, listed several advantages of releasing a dissertation immediately and added that “the potential disadvantages… remain anecdotal.” In the years since the flurry of writing responding to the AHA statement, the discussion of dissertation embargoes has continued, but the issues have remained largely the same. Thus, this memo from the UC Berkeley graduate dean (2013) remains an excellent summary.

3. I’m working on my thesis/dissertation and I have copyright questions. Where can I find answers?

Students writing theses/dissertations most commonly have questions about their own copyright ownership or the use of other people’s copyrighted materials in their own work.

You automatically own the copyright in your thesis/dissertation   as soon as you create it , regardless of whether you register it or include a copyright page or copyright notice. Most students choose not to register their copyrights, though some choose to do so because they value having their copyright ownership officially and publicly recorded. Getting a copyright registered is required before you can sue someone for infringement.

If you decide to register your copyright, you can do so

  • directly, through the Copyright Office website , for $35
  • by having ProQuest/UMI contact the Copyright Office on your behalf, for $65.

It is common to incorporate 1) writing you have done for journal articles as part of your dissertation, and 2) parts of your dissertation into articles or books . See, for example, these articles from Wiley and Taylor & Francis giving authors tips on how to successfully turn dissertations into articles, or these pages at Sage , Springer , and Elsevier listing reuse in a thesis or dissertation as a common right of authors. Because this is a well-known practice, and often explicitly allowed in publishers’ contracts with authors, it rarely raises copyright concerns. eScholarship , which hosts over 55,000 UC ETDs, has never received a takedown notice from a publisher based on a complaint that the author’s ETD was too similar to the author’s published work.

Incorporating the works of others in your thesis/dissertation – such as quotations or illustrative images – is often allowed by copyright law. This is the case when the original work isn’t protected by copyright, or if the way you’re using the work would be considered fair use. In some circumstances, however, you will need permission from the copyright holder.  For more information, please consult the Berkeley Library’s guide to Copyright and Publishing Your Dissertation .

For more in depth information about copyright generally, visit the UC Copyright site.

4. Where can I find UC Dissertations and Theses online?

All ten UC campuses make their electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) openly accessible to readers around the world. You can view over 55,000 UC ETDs in eScholarship , UC’s open access repository. View ETDs from each campus:

  • Santa Barbara

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Dissertations at UCLA and Beyond

Index to doctoral dissertations from 1637 to the present, with abstracts since 1980. A number of master's theses are also indexed, with abstracts since 1988. Many are available for download in pdf format. UCLA has access to all full text dissertations in the database. Non-UCLA users may use Dissertations Express to purchase digital or print copies of individual dissertations.

  • Center for Research Libraries (CRL) Foreign Dissertations Search the CRL Catalog for dissertations already held at the Center. If a foreign dissertation is not at CRL, UCLA's Interlibrary Loan Service will request that CRL acquire it for your use. This special issue of Focus on Global Resources describes CRL's extensive collection of foreign dissertations.
  • Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations This international organization promotes the adoption, creation, use, dissemination, and preservation of electronic analogues to traditional paper-based theses and dissertations in order to more effectively share knowledge.

Selected Dissertations - Architecture & Urban Design

  • Architecture
  • The search for a theory in architecture : Anglo-American debates, 1957-1976 / Louis Martin. Thesis--Ph.D.; Princeton University, 2002.
  • Affordable Housing in High Opportunity Areas : Insights for Fair Housing Advocates / by Emmanuel Proussaloglou Thesis--M.U.R.P.; University of California, Los Angeles, 2023.
  • Connecting Pico : a study of alternatives to re-knit the Pico Neighborhood that was divided by the I-10 freeway in Santa Monica, California / by Cecilia Garcia Urban Planning Project (M.A.)--UCLA, 2010.
  • Streetscape improvement recommendations: CRA/LA Cleantech Corridor / by Daniel Caroselli Urban Planning Project (M.A.)--UCLA, 2011.
  • Politics and the adoption of local development policies in Southern California cities / by Todd Andrew Donovan Dissertation--Ph. D.; University of California, Riverside, 1991.
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UCLA Department of Anthropology

Theses and Dissertations

Booklets – m.a. recipients & ph.d. graduates.

  • 2019-20, 2020-21, Summer 2021

2022-23 Theses, Reports, and Dissertations

Master’s Theses & Reports

Madison Aubey, MA

The Archaeology of Sovereignty: Africatown, Black Mobile, and Resistive Consumption

Chair: Justin P. Dunnavant

Amber Kela Chong, MA

Experiments in Sovereignty: Cultivating ʻĀina Momona at Waipā

Chair: Jessica Cattelino  

Dani Heffernan, MA

Constructing the “Cisgender Listening Subject”: Trans-Feminine Speakers’ Commentaries on Voice and Being Heard

Chair: Norma Mendoza-Denton  

Sally Li, MA

Racial and temporal differences in fertility-education tradeoffs highlight the effect of economic opportunities on optimum family size in the US

Chair: Brooke Scelza  

Robin Stevland Meyer-Lorey, MA

Manifest Destiny in Southeast Asia: Archaeology of American Colonial Industry in the Philippines, 1898-1987

Chair: Stephen Acabado  

Victoria Newhall, MA.

Evaluating the Role of Foodways During Large-Scale Socio-Political Transformations at Formative Tres Zapotes

Co-Chairs: Richard Lesure and Gregson Schachner  

Wanda Quintanilla Duran, MA

Chair: Jason De León  

The Force of Intimacy in a Honduran Community

Nicole Smith, M.A.

From Exile to Eviction: Garífuna Indigeneity, Land Rights, and Heritage in Roatán, Honduras

Co-Chairs: Jason De León and Justin Dunnavant

Doctoral Dissertations

Steven Ammerman, PhD

Human-Animal Interaction at the Ancient Urban Site of Sisupalgarh, India

Chair: Monica L. Smith

Spencer Chao-Long Chen, PhD

Dubbing Ideologies: The Politics of Language and Acoustic Aesthetics in Taiwan’s Mandarin-Voiceover Production

Chair: Paul V. Kroskrity

Kristine Joy Chua, PhD

Environmental, Biological, and Cultural Influences on Health and Behavior

Chair: Abigail Bigham

Rodney R. Gratreaks Jr., PhD

Talking to the Wind: Towards an Understanding of Numic Verbal Art and Language Planning in the Village of Shaxwapats

Emily Virginia Jones, PhD

A Violent Operation: Trauma Surgery, Policing, and the Politics of Care in a Los Angeles County Public Hospital

Chair: Laurie Kain Hart

Sucharita Kanjilal, PhD

Home Chefs: Indian Households Produce for the Global Creator Economy

Chair: Akhil Gupta

Andrew E. MacIver, Ph.D.

The Shang-Zhou Transition: Immanence, Power, and the Micropolitics of Encounter

Chair: Li Min

Joshua L. Mayer, PhD

Conjuring Territory: Afro-Indigenous Authority and Settler Capitalism in Nicaragua

Chair: Shannon Speed

Bianca Romagnoli, PhD

Patrolling North of 60: Military Infrastructure in Canada’s Arctic Communities

Co-Chairs: Salih Can Açiksöz and Laurie Kain Hart

Theodore Samore, PhD

Traditionalism, Pathogen Avoidance, and Competing Tradeoffs During a Global Threat

Chair: Daniel M.T. Fessler

William James Schlesinger, PhD

The Production and Governance of Risky Sexual Subjectivity in the Era of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) to HIV

Chair: Salih Can Açiksöz

Saliem Wakeem Shehadeh, PhD

Researching the General Union of Palestine Students from the Diaspora

Co-Chairs: Jemima Pierre and Susan Slyomovics

Madeleine Amee Yakal, PhD

Spanish Colonialism in Bikol, Philippines: Localizing Devotion to Our Lady of Peñafrancia

Chair: Stephen Acabado

2021-22 Theses, Reports, and Dissertations

Master’s Theses & Reports

Emilia Rose Ørsted Holmbeck, MA

Contextualizing PTSD as Diagnosis and Intervention: Situating Trauma and the Subjective Experience of Suffering in Locally Meaningful Worlds

Co-Chairs: Douglas W. Hollan & Linda Garro  

Jewell Ruth-Ella Humphrey, MA

Harboring History: A Maritime Archaeological Analysis of an 18th Century Shipwreck in Coral Bay, St. Jan

Co-Chairs: Stephen Acabado & Justin Dunnavant  

Lillian Kohn, MA

Public Mourning, Online Spaces: Virtual Memorialization and Binational Grief in Israel-Palestine

Chair: Susan Slyomovics  

NaaKoshie Awurama Mills, MA

Par for the Corps: Black Diplomats and Race in U.S. Foreign Policy

Chair: Laurie Hart  

Abdullah Puckett, MA

Decarceration and Social Justice Activism in South Central LA

Chair: Philippe Bourgois

  Matthew James Schneider, MA

Against Accountability: Policing and Public Knowledge in Los Angeles

Chair: Hannah Appel  

Doğa Tekin, MA

Claiming Big Sur: How Places Enter Semiosis

Co-Chairs: Erin Debenport & Paul V. Kroskrity  

Kimberly Tanya Zhu, MA

Genomic Features Underlying Andean High-Altitude Adaptive Hemoglobin Levels

Chair: Abigail Bigham  

Brittany Nicole Florkiewicz, PhD

Properties of Facial Signaling in Captive Chimpanzees ( Pan troglodytes )

Chair: Brooke Scelza   Yanina Gori, PhD

Re/mediating Revolution: Cultivating Solidarity in a Cuban Queer Community

Co-Chairs: Hannah Appel & C. Jason Throop  

Jananie Kalyanaraman, PhD

Window seats: Making connection through transport and mobility in Bengaluru city, India

  Eva Rose Melstrom, PhD

The Gate of Weeping: Ethiopian Women Returning from Domestic Work in the Arab States of the Persian Gulf

Co-Chairs: Douglas W. Hollan & C. Jason Throop  

Zachary Mondesire, PhD

Region-craft: An Ethnography of South Sudan’s Transnational Intelligentsia

Lauren Textor, PhD

Deserving Abandonment: Governing Pain and Addiction across U.S. Opioid Landscapes

Co-Chairs: Philippe Bourgois & Laurie Hart

2020-21 Theses and Dissertations

Master’s Theses

Sara Isabel Castro Font, MA

Hipsters, Drunks, Tourists, and Locals: Calle Loíza as a Site of Ideological Contestation

Co-Chairs: Erin Debenport & Paul V. Kroskrity

Lilit Ghazaryan, MA

Speak Beautifully – Language Policies and Practices in Public Kindergartens in Armenia

Chair: Erica Cartmill

Nicco Amedeo La Mattina, MA

“Giving the Meaning” as a Social Practice on Pantelleria: The Metasemantics of Atttunement

Chair: Alessandro Duranti

Alessandra May Laurer Rosen, MA

Semiotic Labors of Personalization: Modernization and Access in an American Yoga School

Danielle Leigh Steinberg, MA

A robust tool kit: first report of tool use in crested capuchin monkeys ( Sapajus robustus )

Chair: Jessica Lynch

Jessie Serene Stoolman, MA

Writing Letters and Reading against the Grain of Anthropology’s Past

Chair: Aomar Boum

Donghyoun We, MA

Food and Restaurants: A Review of the Literature and Exploratory Observations of Restaurant Pivots in LA in the Time of COVID-19

Madeleine Louise Zoeller, MA

Eye See You: Investigating Predictors of the Evil Eye

Chair: Joseph Manson

Farzad Amoozegar-Fassaie, PhD

The Pursuit of Happiness and the Other: Being a Syrian Refugee Child in America

Co-Chairs: Alessandro Duranti & C. Jason Throop

Theresa Hill Arriola, PhD

Securing Nature: Militarism, Indigeneity and the Environment in the Northern Mariana Islands

Chair: Jessica Cattelino

Yael Assor, PhD

Objectivity as a Bureaucratic Virtue: The Lived Experience of Objectivity in an Israeli Medical Bureaucracy

Chair: C. Jason Throop

Amanda Jean Bailey, PhD

Alluvial Hope: The Transformative Practices of Placemaking at a Montana Tribal College

Co-Chairs: Paul V. Kroskrity & Cheryl Mattingly

Hannah Addaline Carlan, PhD

Producing Prosperity: Language and the Labor of Development in India’s Western Himalayas

Alejandro Suleman Erut, PhD

Lying: an anthropological approach

Chair: H. Clark Barrett

Nafis Aziz Hasan, PhD

Techno-politics of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) – Investigating Practices and Social Relations in Indian Public Bureaucracies

Tanya Ruth Matthan, PhD

The Monsoon and the Market: Economies of Risk in Rural India

Agatha Evangeline Palma, PhD

The Migrant, The Mediterranean, and the Tourist: Figures of Belonging in Post-Austerity Palermo

Co-Chairs: Aomar Boum & Laurie Kain Hart

Sonya Rao, PhD

Privatizing Language Work: Interpreters and Access in Los Angeles Immigration Court

Alexander Malcolm Thomson, PhD

Mesologues: An Ethnobibliographic Study of Cultural and Lingual Politics in Contemporary Brittany

Co-Chairs: Laurie Kain Hart & Paul V. Kroskrity

2019-20 Theses, Reports, and Dissertations

Ulises Espinoza, MA

Intuitions on Ownership Among the Achuar of Southeastern Ecuador

Eden Franz, MA

Cultural and Interspecific Symbiosis at Salemi, Sicily: Exploring Colonial and Human-Animal Interactions Through Faunal Analysis

Joelle Julien, MA

Haitian Migration to Tijuana, Mexico: Black Migrants and the Political Economy of Race and Migration

Chair: Jemima Pierre

Eric Andrew Sinski, MA

Imagined Communities: Patriotic Sentiment Among Chinese Students Abroad in the Era of Xi Jinping

Chair: Yunxiang Yan

Sasha Lutz Winkler, MA

The Development of Sex Differences in Play in Wild White-Faced Capuchins

Katelyn Jo Bishop, PhD

Ritual Practice, Ceremonial Organization, and the Value and Use of Birds in Prehispanic Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, 800-1150 CE

Co-Chairs: Richard Lesure & Gregson Schachner

Molly Josette Bloom, PhD

Thick Sociality: Community, Disability, and Language in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation

Chair: Norma Mendoza-Denton

Courtney Evelyn Cecale, PhD

Scientific Governance and the Cultural Politics of Climate Change Adaptation in the Peruvian Andes

Amy Marie Garey, PhD

The People’s Laughter: War, Comedy, and the Soviet Legacy

Chair: Nancy E. Levine

Kotrina Kajokaite, PhD

Social relationships in wild white-faced capuchin monkeys ( Cebus capucinus ): Insights from new modeling approaches

Chair: Susan Perry

Matthew Richard McCoy, PhD

Unsettling Futures: Morality, Time, and Death in a Divided Belfast Community

Dalila Isoke Ozier, PhD

City of Magic: Aesthetic Value in the Los Angeles Magic Scene

Chair: Sherry B. Ortner

Mindy Gayle Steinberg, PhD

Legal Status and the Everyday Lives of Mexican-Origin Youth in Los Angeles: Family, Gratitude, and the High School Transition

Chair: Thomas S. Weisner

Christopher Shawn Stephan, PhD

“Focus on the Users”: Empathy, Anticipation, and Perspective-Taking in Healthcare Architecture

Anoush Tamar Suni, PhD

Palimpsests of Violence: Ruination and the Politics of Memory in Anatolia

Chair: Susan Slyomovics

Gwyneth Ursula Jean Talley, PhD

Gunpowder Women: Gender, Kinship & Horses in Moroccan Equestrian Performance

Co-Chairs: Nancy E. Levine & Susan Slyomovics

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Graduate Dissertation Research

Graduate – current – dissertation research.

‘The Eternal Now’: Suicide Notes in Fact, Fiction, and Species Author: Kristen Cardon Advisor: Prof. DeLoughrey

The Boundaries of Memory: Aberrant Remembering in Nineteenth-Century Literature from Déjà Vu to Ancestral Recall Author: Jessica Cook Advisor: Prof. Grossman

An Unmet Promise: Aerial Perspective in Modernist Literature Author: Elizabeth Crawford Advisor: Prof. Hornby

Metagenres of Modernity: Dictatorship Novels and Speculative Fiction in the 20th and 21st Centuries Author: Abraham Encinas Advisor: Prof. López

Late-Nineteenth-Century Anglophone Ballads from Canada, India, and the United States: Generic Traditions of Race, Nationalism, and Imperialism Author: Vanessa Febo Advisors: Prof. McHugh, Prof. Yarborough

Queer Magic: Sin and the Supernatural, 1150-1650 Author: Kersti Francis Advisors: Prof. Chism, Prof. Gallagher

Mobile Figures and Laboring Travel in American Literature Author: Thomas Garcia Advisor: Prof. Pérez-Torres

Desert Dreams: The Primordial Temporality and Underworld Sublimity of TransBorder Art Author: Salvador Herrera Advisors: Prof. R. Lee, Prof. Pérez-Torres

Sex and the British Novel Author: Miranda Hoegberg Advisors: Prof. Kareem, Prof. Makdisi

Sense Epistemologies of the Mongol Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368) in Medieval Contact Literatures Author: Misho Ishikawa Advisor: Prof. Chism

The Anatomy of Risk: Economies of the Body in the Pre-Modern Period Author: Rafael Jaime Advisors: Prof. Fisher, Prof. Fuchs

Performing Displacement: Precarious Encounters, Hospitality Events, and the Theater of Migration Author: Robin Kello Advisor: Prof. Fuchs

Across Africa’s American Waters: Middle Passages, Imagined Home Spaces and Black Futurities Author: Jessica Lee Advisor: Prof. Goyal

U.S. Movement Literatures and Circulation Struggles, 1965-1973 Author: Robert Mendoza Advisor: Prof. Yarborough

Minor Abstractions: Theory, Ambience, Accounting Author: Dandi Meng Advisors: Prof. McMillan, Prof. Nersessian

Time Out of Joint: Counterfactuals, Alternate Histories, and Traumatic Narrative Author: Taly Ravid Advisors: Prof. Deutsch, Prof. North

Distasteful Sights: On Disgust and Film Form Author: Emma Ridder Advisors: Prof. Hornby, Prof. McHugh

Our Planet: Collective Narrative and Collective Politics in the Climate Change Era Author: Spencer Robins Advisor: Prof. Heise, Prof. Allison Carruth

Reading in Books: Theories of Reading in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction Author: Samantha Sommers Advisor: Prof. Looby

The Novel and the Transient: Queer Turns in Surrealism Author: Emma Spies Advisor: Prof. Hornby

The Extractivist Episteme in American Narrative: Natural Resources, Bodies, and Environmental Injustice Author: Matthew Swanson Advisor: Prof. Heise

Fossil Power: American Literature and Energy Empire Author: Shouhei Tanaka Advisors: Prof. Heise, Allison Carruth

Contested Bodies: Fictions of Brownness and Latinidad Author: Samantha Solis Advisor: Prof. López

Disability and Political Economy in Romantic Literature, 1762-1834 Author: Lesley Thulin Advisor: Prof. Helen Deutsch

Modes of World-Remaking in 17th-Century English Literature Author: Joseph Torres Advisor: Prof. Gallagher

Human Rights and Postcolonial Critique: Narrating Economic and Social Rights in the Contemporary Postcolonial Novel Author: Arielle Stambler Advisor: Prof. Goyal, Prof. Rothberg

Unimaginable Subjects: Centroamericanos in the Latino Nineteenth Century Author: Gabriela Valenzuela Advisor: Prof. López

More or Less Alive: Labor and Race in Comics’ Vital Aesthetics Author: Tony Wei Ling Advisor: Prof. R. Lee

Visibility, Inscrutability, and the Asiatic Body Author: Brenda Wang Advisor: Prof. Hornby

Foxe’s Book of Martyrs and the Foundations of British Revolutionary Thought, 1563-Present Author: Stanley Wu Advisor: Prof. Shuger

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Ph.D. Dissertations A comprehensive list of the Ph.D. dissertations written at UCLA Linguistics over the last 50+ years.

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M.A. Recipients & Theses A comprehensive list of the M.A. papers and theses written at UCLA Linguistics over the last 30+ years.

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Summer Dissertation Programs 2023

The Graduate Writing Center holds several programs during the summer to support graduate students who are at the dissertation, dissertation proposal, or master's thesis writing stages. Programs are free of charge to UCLA graduate students who participate. Note: All summer programs will be held via Zoom. We encourage you to participate and have a productive summer!

How to Apply: Submit an application by the deadline indicated for the specific program. We screen to make sure participants are in the appropriate fields and at the appropriate stages, but we otherwise accept as many people as we can.

Eligibility: Only UCLA graduate and professional students are eligible to apply. Participants should also be at the appropriate stage and in an appropriate field for the program to which they apply.

If you have any questions, please contact [email protected]

1) Dissertation Boot Camp (Humanities & Arts)

This program targets humanities and arts graduate students who have advanced to candidacy and are at the dissertation-writing stage. The program will teach writing strategies and provide structure to help participants produce a draft of a dissertation chapter. Graduate students from social science fields who use humanities approaches, such as historians or political science students who focus on theory, may also apply to this program. This program will meet Mondays, 1:00–4:00 PM via Zoom, for the 6 weeks of Summer Session A (June 26–July 31), except the session on Monday, July 3rd will be moved to Wednesday, July 5th, 1:00–4:00 PM. Deadline extended to: Friday, June 23rd.

CLICK to see application instructions and program details.

How to Apply for the Humanities & Arts Dissertation Chapter Boot Camp : Interested graduate students must fill out the application Google form linked here (your application will be kept confidential) by Friday, June 23rd . Space is limited.

Preparation for the Humanities & Arts Dissertation Boot Camp (for those accepted)

First Session Preparation and Homework :

Before the first session, participants should 1) read/skim a dissertation recently completed in your department, preferably one chaired by your dissertation committee chair, to get a sense of overall structure (search ProQuest Dissertations/Theses database by advisor); 2) review and do a brief outline/sketch (1-page maximum) of the structure of one of the analytical chapters in the sample dissertation, paying attention to a) type of content (primary source analysis, secondary criticism, theory, historical or biographical background, etc.); and b) form (narrative arc, argument, and language that signposts what the writer is doing); 3) organize your notes, sources, and data for the analytical dissertation chapter you will work on during the program. Bring all relevant materials into a single physical and/or electronic location to simplify your workflow.

Participants should bring to the first session

1) your brief sketch of the sample dissertation chapter you reviewed; and 2) a 1-2 page outline of the analytical dissertation chapter you will work on during the program. If you are in the very early stages, a bulleted list of the topics and ideas you plan to address in the chapter would be fine.

Homework for Subsequent Sessions: Each session after the first will require 5 to 10 pages of new writing (of the dissertation draft). There may be additional reading and homework assignments to reinforce writing strategies.

Strongly Recommended Reading: Joan Bolker. Writing Your Dissertation in Fifteen Minutes a Day . 1998. (Available at the UCLA bookstore.) We recommend a more careful reading of chapters 3, 4 and 8, but the entire book is worth skimming.

Not sure whether you should apply to the Humanities or Qualitative Social Sciences Dissertation Boot Camp?

Your dissertation fits well with the humanities if one or more of the following applies:

  • you study texts, aesthetic objects, or theories;
  • you don't have separate chapters on literature review and methods;
  • you don't work with human subjects (in a manner requiring IRB approval);
  • and/or your chapters are organized in a purely topical way.

Your dissertation fits well with the qualitative social sciences if one or more of the following applies:

  • you have separate methods and literature review chapters;
  • you work with human subjects and went through the IRB process;
  • you do descriptive or ethnographic research based on interviews and observations;
  • your data analysis involves coding;
  • and/or you write your findings in results and discussion chapters.

Some research--such as oral histories, ethnographic studies, and studies of language and performance--falls in between humanities and qualitative social sciences, but we usually group projects involving human subjects with qualitative social sciences. Oral historians who don't code their interviews may fit better with the humanities. If you are not sure which section to choose, please consult with the GWC Director (Marilyn Gray: [email protected] ).

Deadline extended to: Friday, June 23rd.

2) Dissertation Boot Camp (Qualitative Social Sciences)

This program targets graduate students using qualitative social science research methods or mixed methods with a qualitative emphasis. Graduate students who apply to this program should have defended their proposals, completed the majority of their data collection and analysis, and be ready to write (or already writing) the results and discussion chapters (or sections). The program will address writing issues specific to qualitative research as well as general writing and organizational strategies. You are also welcome to apply if you use mixed or quantitative methods but intend to work on a descriptive or qualitative section. This program will meet Tuesdays, 10:00 AM–1:00 PM via Zoom, for the 6 weeks of Session A, June 27–August 1, except the session on Tuesday, July 4th will be moved to Wednesday, July 5th (10 AM–1 PM). Deadline extended to: Friday, June 23rd.

How to Apply for the Qualitative Social Sciences Dissertation Chapter Boot Camp : Interested graduate students must fill out the Google application form linked here (your application will be kept confidential) by Friday, June 23rd .

Preparation for the Qualitative Dissertation Boot Camp (for those accepted)

Before the first session, participants should 1) read/skim a dissertation recently completed in your department, preferably one chaired by your dissertation committee chair, to get a sense of overall structure (search ProQuest Dissertations/Theses database by advisor); 2) review and do a brief outline/sketch (1-page maximum) of the structure of one of the analytical chapters in the sample dissertation, paying attention to a) type of content (data analysis, relevant empirical literature, theory, historical background, cultural context, etc.); and b) form (narrative arc, argument, and language that signposts what the writer is doing); 3) organize your notes, sources, and data for the analytical dissertation chapter you will work on during the program. Bring all relevant materials into a single physical and/or electronic location to simplify your workflow.

Participants should bring to the first session 1) your brief sketch of the sample dissertation chapter you reviewed; and 2) a 1-2 page outline of the analytical dissertation chapter you will work on during the program. If you are in the very early stages, a bulleted list of the topics and ideas you plan to address in the chapter would be fine.

3) Dissertation Proposal Boot Camp (Social Sciences)

The Social Sciences Dissertation Proposal Boot Camp is designed to help graduate students make substantial progress on a draft of their dissertation proposals. Sessions will cover strategies for writing the components of the proposal as well as managing the process. For guidance concerning research design, methodology, and other field-specific issues, please consult with faculty mentors. This program will meet Tuesdays, 3:00–5:00 & Thursdays, 3:00–4:00 PM via Zoom, for the 6 weeks of Summer Session A, June 27th–August 3rd, except the session on Tuesday, July 4th will be moved to Wednesday, July 5th. Deadline extended to: Friday, June 23rd.

How to Apply : Interested graduate students must fill out the Google application form linked here (your application will be kept confidential) by Friday, June 23rd . Space is limited.

Homework for those accepted to the Social Sciences Dissertation Proposal Boot Camp:

For the first session , participants must bring the following:

  • Annotated Bibliography : bring a bibliography of your secondary and theoretical sources. Select four or five of the most important theoretical and secondary sources and write a paragraph or two about each. Also make sure that you have organized notes for your other sources. For the other sources that will be discussed in your literature review, we recommend writing at least a short annotation (2-3 sentences) for each one.
  • Project description (from application): bring a 200-300 word description of your dissertation project. Please be prepared to articulate your research topic succinctly.
  • Research questions: bring in a printout of your specific research questions, or if appropriate, your hypotheses and aims.
  • Recommended Reading : Joan Bolker. Writing Your Dissertation in Fifteen Minutes A Day . 1998. Chapters 1, 3 and 4. (Available at the UCLA bookstore.)

For subsequent sessions : Each session will have a required writing assignment related to your proposal. There may also be required readings that we will make available electronically.

Not sure whether you should apply to the Humanities Prospectus or Social Sciences Proposal Boot Camp?

4) Dissertation Prospectus Boot Camp (Humanities & Arts)

The Humanities Dissertation Prospectus Boot Camp is designed to help graduate students in the humanities and/or those conducting interdisciplinary research make substantial progress on a draft of their dissertation prospectuses. The goal is to demystify the dissertation prospectus. Sessions will cover strategies for writing the components of the prospectus as well as managing the writing process, deadlines, and committee. Guidance will include field-specific components like research design and methodology; however participants will also be encouraged to consult with their faculty advisors/mentors throughout the process. This program will meet Tuesdays & Thursdays, 4:00–5:45 PM, via Zoom for 6 weeks (July 25–August 31). Deadline Extended to: Friday, July 21st.

How to Apply : Interested graduate students must fill out the Google application form linked here (your application will be kept confidential) by Friday, July 21st .

Homework for those accepted to the Humanities & Arts Prospectus Boot Camp:

For the first session, participants must bring in the following:

  • Annotated Bibliography: bring a bibliography of your secondary and theoretical sources. Select four or five of the most important theoretical and secondary sources and write a paragraph or two about each. Also make sure that you have organized notes for your other sources. For the other sources that will be discussed in your literature review, we recommend writing at least a short annotation (2-3 sentences) for each one.
  • Reading Assignment : In preparation for the first session, please read: Joan Bolker. Writing Your Dissertation in Fifteen Minutes A Day . 1998. Chapters 1, 3 and 4. (Available at the UCLA bookstore.)

For subsequent sessions: Each session will have a required writing assignment related to your prospectus. There may be additional required readings that we will make available electronically.

Your dissertation fits well with the social sciences if one or more of the following applies:

Deadline to Apply Extended to: Friday, July 21st.

5) Summer Writing Retreat (All Fields)

For varioius reasons, we have decided to cancel the 2023 Summer Thesis Retreat. We apologize for any inconvenience. We encourage you to register for summer online writing groups and mindful writing retreats ( linked here ).

If you have any questions, please contact [email protected]

Previous Workshops and Programs

Click here to see an archive of past programs and workshops .

UCLA Political Science

Dissertation

Once the coursework and field papers are completed, students proceed to the dissertation stage. The first step is to delineate an original research project in a dissertation prospectus. Presented to a faculty examining committee, the prospectus provides the principal basis for discussion during the qualifying oral examination which advances the student to PhD. candidacy. Sometimes the dissertation emerges directly from earlier field papers; but students often extend themselves in unexpected directions as they open new avenues of discovery. Either way, we take it as our obligation to try to provide constructive guidance without usurping the student’s intellectual autonomy. In the usual course of things, we expect students to complete their graduate training in five to seven years.

UCLA College | Social Sciences | Political Science

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How to find resources by format

Why use a dissertation or a thesis.

A dissertation is the final large research paper, based on original research, for many disciplines to be able to complete a PhD degree. The thesis is the same idea but for a masters degree.

They are often considered scholarly sources since they are closely supervised by a committee, are directed at an academic audience, are extensively researched, follow research methodology, and are cited in other scholarly work. Often the research is newer or answering questions that are more recent, and can help push scholarship in new directions. 

Search for dissertations and theses

Locating dissertations and theses.

The Proquest Dissertations and Theses Global database includes doctoral dissertations and selected masters theses from major universities worldwide.

  • Searchable by subject, author, advisor, title, school, date, etc.
  • More information about full text access and requesting through Interlibrary Loan

NDLTD – Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations provides free online access to a over a million theses and dissertations from all over the world.

WorldCat Dissertations and Theses searches library catalogs from across the U.S. and worldwide.

Locating University of Minnesota Dissertations and Theses

Use  Libraries search  and search by title or author and add the word "thesis" in the search box. Write down the library and call number and find it on the shelf. They can be checked out.

Check the  University Digital Conservancy  for online access to dissertations and theses from 2007 to present as well as historic, scanned theses from 1887-1923.

Other Sources for Dissertations and Theses

  • Center for Research Libraries
  • DART-Europe E-Thesis Portal
  • Theses Canada
  • Ethos (Great Britain)
  • Australasian Digital Theses in Trove
  • DiVA (Sweden)
  • E-Thesis at the University of Helsinki
  • DissOnline (Germany)
  • List of libraries worldwide - to search for a thesis when you know the institution and cannot find in the larger collections

University of Minnesota Dissertations and Theses FAQs

What dissertations and theses are available.

With minor exceptions, all doctoral dissertations and all "Plan A" master's theses accepted by the University of Minnesota are available in the University Libraries system. In some cases (see below) only a non-circulating copy in University Archives exists, but for doctoral dissertations from 1940 to date, and for master's theses from 1925 to date, a circulating copy should almost always be available.

"Plan B" papers, accepted in the place of a thesis in many master's degree programs, are not received by the University Libraries and are generally not available. (The only real exceptions are a number of old library school Plan B papers on publishing history, which have been separately cataloged.) In a few cases individual departments may have maintained files of such papers.

In what libraries are U of M dissertations and theses located?

Circulating copies of doctoral dissertations:.

  • Use Libraries Search to look for the author or title of the work desired to determine location and call number of a specific dissertation. Circulating copies of U of M doctoral dissertations can be in one of several locations in the library system, depending upon the date and the department for which the dissertation was done. The following are the general rules:
  • Dissertations prior to 1940 Circulating copies of U of M dissertations prior to 1940 do not exist (with rare exceptions): for these, only the archival copy (see below) is available. Also, most dissertations prior to 1940 are not cataloged in MNCAT and can only be identified by the departmental listings described below.  
  • Dissertations from 1940-1979 Circulating copies of U of M dissertations from 1940 to 1979 will in most cases be held within the Elmer L. Andersen Library, with three major classes of exceptions: dissertations accepted by biological, medical, and related departments are housed in the Health Science Library; science/engineering dissertations from 1970 to date will be located in the Science and Engineering Library (in Walter); and dissertations accepted by agricultural and related departments are available at the Magrath Library or one of the other libraries on the St. Paul campus (the Magrath Library maintains records of locations for such dissertations).  
  • Dissertations from 1980-date Circulating copies of U of M dissertations from 1980 to date at present may be located either in Wilson Library (see below) or in storage; consult Libraries Search for location of specific items. Again, exceptions noted above apply here also; dissertations in their respective departments will instead be in Health Science Library or in one of the St. Paul campus libraries.

Circulating copies of master's theses:

  • Theses prior to 1925 Circulating copies of U of M master's theses prior to 1925 do not exist (with rare exceptions); for these, only the archival copy (see below) is available.  
  • Theses from 1925-1996 Circulating copies of U of M master's theses from 1925 to 1996 may be held in storage; consult Libraries search in specific instances. Once again, there are exceptions and theses in their respective departments will be housed in the Health Science Library or in one of the St. Paul campus libraries.  
  • Theses from 1997-date Circulating copies of U of M master's theses from 1997 to date will be located in Wilson Library (see below), except for the same exceptions for Health Science  and St. Paul theses. There is also an exception to the exception: MHA (Masters in Health Administration) theses through 1998 are in the Health Science Library, but those from 1999 on are in Wilson Library.

Archival copies (non-circulating)

Archival (non-circulating) copies of virtually all U of M doctoral dissertations from 1888-1952, and of U of M master's theses from all years up to the present, are maintained by University Archives (located in the Elmer L. Andersen Library). These copies must be consulted on the premises, and it is highly recommended for the present that users make an appointment in advance to ensure that the desired works can be retrieved for them from storage. For dissertations accepted prior to 1940 and for master's theses accepted prior to 1925, University Archives is generally the only option (e.g., there usually will be no circulating copy). Archival copies of U of M doctoral dissertations from 1953 to the present are maintained by Bell and Howell Corporation (formerly University Microfilms Inc.), which produces print or filmed copies from our originals upon request. (There are a very few post-1952 U of M dissertations not available from Bell and Howell; these include such things as music manuscripts and works with color illustrations or extremely large pages that will not photocopy well; in these few cases, our archival copy is retained in University Archives.)

Where is a specific dissertation of thesis located?

To locate a specific dissertation or thesis it is necessary to have its call number. Use Libraries Search for the author or title of the item, just as you would for any other book. Depending on date of acceptance and cataloging, a typical call number for such materials should look something like one of the following:

Dissertations: Plan"A" Theses MnU-D or 378.7M66 MnU-M or 378.7M66 78-342 ODR7617 83-67 OL6156 Libraries Search will also tell the library location (MLAC, Health Science Library, Magrath or another St. Paul campus library, Science and Engineering, Business Reference, Wilson Annex or Wilson Library). Those doctoral dissertations still in Wilson Library (which in all cases should be 1980 or later and will have "MnU-D" numbers) are located in the central section of the third floor. Those master's theses in Wilson (which in all cases will be 1997 or later and will have "MnU-M" numbers) are also located in the central section of the third floor. Both dissertations and theses circulate and can be checked out, like any other books, at the Wilson Circulation desk on the first floor.

How can dissertations and theses accepted by a specific department be located?

Wilson Library contains a series of bound and loose-leaf notebooks, arranged by department and within each department by date, listing dissertations and theses. Information given for each entry includes name of author, title, and date (but not call number, which must be looked up individually). These notebooks are no longer current, but they do cover listings by department from the nineteenth century up to approximately 1992. Many pre-1940 U of M dissertations and pre-1925 U of M master's theses are not cataloged (and exist only as archival copies). Such dissertations can be identified only with these volumes. The books and notebooks are shelved in the general collection under these call numbers: Wilson Ref LD3337 .A5 and Wilson Ref quarto LD3337 .U9x. Major departments of individual degree candidates are also listed under their names in the GRADUATE SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT programs of the U of M, available in University Archives and (for recent years) also in Wilson stacks (LD3361 .U55x).

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Updates to the DataX Initiative and Launch of Faculty Searches

Dear Colleagues:

I write to share an update on UCLA’s DataX initiative, our institution’s effort to respond to the critical and growing role that data plays within the academy and across society.

DataX was launched in 2021 in recognition of the fact that the collection, analysis and application of data has completely transformed the way we live our lives, make decisions, engage with one another and conduct academic inquiry.

Over the last several months, DataX has launched its new website , presented and co-sponsored numerous programs, commissioned the development of new courses and hired several new staff members. Accordingly, we have grown and adjusted the structure of the DataX initiative to ensure that the effort has the capacity and infrastructure to support the entire campus community. Notably, the initiative has now shifted under the auspices of the EVCP Office from the Office of Research and Creative Activities. Additionally, we are beginning the process of working with the Academic Senate to develop it into an Organized Research Unit, emphasizing its focus on ensuring that UCLA scholars have the skills and knowledge to harness data effectively in their research across the disciplines. 

Aligned with these changes, we have implemented an expanded leadership model, with a faculty lead for each of DataX’s three pillars: 

  • Data Justice and Critical Data Studies : Safiya U. Noble, David O. Sears Presidential Endowed Chair of Social Sciences and professor of gender studies, African American studies and information studies
  • Fundamental Data Science : Mark S. Handcock, distinguished professor of statistics
  • Innovative Applications and Creative Activity : Chris Johanson, associate professor of classics and chair of digital humanities

In addition, the leadership team includes an interim executive faculty director — Eleazar Eskin, professor and chair of the Department of Computational Medicine; and professor of computer science and human genetics — who is helping to integrate the three pillars and promote the collective impact of DataX on and off campus. Continuing in their faculty appointments within the initiative are Associate Director for Faculty Engagement and Associate Professor Sarah T. Roberts; Associate Director for Curriculum and Associate Professor Ozan Jaquette; and Assistant Director for Community Engagement and Professor Ramesh Srinivasan. 

In the year ahead, the initiative will focus on hiring new faculty — which will include new appointments split between DataX and campus units — as well as hiring postdocs, launching a research pipeline in coordination with other units, supporting new courses in data science and the study of data in society, and establishing a physical presence on campus that will become a hub of interdisciplinary collaboration. DataX will continue to issue to the deans periodic calls for letters of interest for new faculty hires. The next call will be for hires starting July 1, 2025. As noted in UCLA Strategic Plan 2023-28 , we endeavor to build a cohort of 60 faculty over the next decade.

Significant growth in the availability and application of data continues to alter so many aspects of our lives and work. The DataX initiative will be critical for allowing UCLA to maintain a leadership position in this academic discipline, empower our community with tools to advance data-related work, and promote greater understanding of the profound social and ethical implications of the data revolution. I encourage you to visit the DataX website or reach out to the faculty directors if you are interested in learning more about DataX collaborations, and hope you join me in wishing the leadership team the best as they advance this exciting initiative.

Darnell Hunt Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost

Powell Library

Dr. Rong Fu is a member of the DataX Faculty Advisory Committee.

Updates to the DataX Initiative and Launch of Faculty Searches

Dear Colleagues:

I write to share an update on UCLA’s DataX initiative, our institution’s effort to respond to the critical and growing role that data plays within the academy and across society.

DataX was launched in 2021 in recognition of the fact that the collection, analysis and application of data has completely transformed the way we live our lives, make decisions, engage with one another and conduct academic inquiry.

Over the last several months, DataX has launched its new website , presented and co-sponsored numerous programs, commissioned the development of new courses and hired several new staff members. Accordingly, we have grown and adjusted the structure of the DataX initiative to ensure that the effort has the capacity and infrastructure to support the entire campus community. Notably, the initiative has now shifted under the auspices of the EVCP Office from the Office of Research and Creative Activities. Additionally, we are beginning the process of working with the Academic Senate to develop it into an Organized Research Unit, emphasizing its focus on ensuring that UCLA scholars have the skills and knowledge to harness data effectively in their research across the disciplines. 

Aligned with these changes, we have implemented an expanded leadership model, with a faculty lead for each of DataX’s three pillars: 

  • Data Justice and Critical Data Studies : Safiya U. Noble, David O. Sears Presidential Endowed Chair of Social Sciences and professor of gender studies, African American studies and information studies
  • Fundamental Data Science : Mark S. Handcock, distinguished professor of statistics
  • Innovative Applications and Creative Activity : Chris Johanson, associate professor of classics and chair of digital humanities

In addition, the leadership team includes an interim executive faculty director — Eleazar Eskin, professor and chair of the Department of Computational Medicine; and professor of computer science and human genetics — who is helping to integrate the three pillars and promote the collective impact of DataX on and off campus. Continuing in their faculty appointments within the initiative are Associate Director for Faculty Engagement and Associate Professor Sarah T. Roberts; Associate Director for Curriculum and Associate Professor Ozan Jaquette; and Assistant Director for Community Engagement and Professor Ramesh Srinivasan. 

In the year ahead, the initiative will focus on hiring new faculty — which will include new appointments split between DataX and campus units — as well as hiring postdocs, launching a research pipeline in coordination with other units, supporting new courses in data science and the study of data in society, and establishing a physical presence on campus that will become a hub of interdisciplinary collaboration. DataX will continue to issue to the deans periodic calls for letters of interest for new faculty hires. The next call will be for hires starting July 1, 2025. As noted in UCLA Strategic Plan 2023-28 , we endeavor to build a cohort of 60 faculty over the next decade.

Significant growth in the availability and application of data continues to alter so many aspects of our lives and work. The DataX initiative will be critical for allowing UCLA to maintain a leadership position in this academic discipline, empower our community with tools to advance data-related work, and promote greater understanding of the profound social and ethical implications of the data revolution. I encourage you to visit the DataX website or reach out to the faculty directors if you are interested in learning more about DataX collaborations, and hope you join me in wishing the leadership team the best as they advance this exciting initiative.

Darnell Hunt Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost

UCLA History Department

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Revue belge de géographie

Accueil Numéros 4 Constructing urban cultural lands...

Constructing urban cultural landscapes & living in the palimpsests: a case of Moscow city (Russia) distant residential areas

A metaphor of palimpsest is used to describe the multivocal cultural landscapes since the 1970s. Interventions into new cultural / humanistic geography, semiotics and the theory of regional geography help to regard each layer of the palimpsest as a constructed context, centered by dominant representation of a place. Real-and-imagined landscapes are regarded as palimpsests lived through everyday practices seen as processes of (re)construction of new layers. Trying to unite those “constructing’ and “living’ perspectives is a challenging task for urban cultural agenda. A series of mobile quest games was made by the author for Moscow Agency for Area Development through Culture in order to construct new tourist sights outside city centre. This project is discussed as a case of constructing new geographical contexts (palimpsest’ layers) and the lived experience rediscovering the distant residential areas, traditionally regarded as standardized “non-places’, as becoming rich in symbolic capital.

La métaphore du palimpseste est utilisée pour décrire les paysages culturels polysémiques depuis les années 1970. Les emprunts à la nouvelle géographie culturelle/humaniste, à la sémiotique et à la théorie de la géographie régionale aident à percevoir chaque couche du palimpseste comme un construit contextualisé, centré sur une représentation dominante d’un lieu. Les paysages à la fois réels et imaginés sont envisagés comme des palimpsestes vécus à travers des pratiques quotidiennes, elles-mêmes vues comme des processus de (re)construction de nouvelles couches. Tenter d’unifier ces perspectives en construction et vécues est un enjeu à l’agenda de la culture urbaine. Une série de jeux de questions sur le terrain ont été construits par l’auteur pour l’Agence moscovite du développement par la culture, afin de construire de nouvelles perspectives touristiques en dehors du centre de Moscou. Ce projet est discuté comme étude de cas d’une volonté de construction de nouveaux contextes géographiques (couches du palimpseste) et d’une expérience vécue de redécouverte de zones résidentielles périphériques, traditionnellement perçues comme des « non-lieux » standardisés, mais qui pourraient acquérir un riche capital symbolique.

Entrées d’index

Mots-clés : , keywords: , texte intégral.

I’m thankful to Uliana Seresova , Assistant Professor of Academy of Public Administration of Moscow region (Russia) for her assistance in the empirical study mentioned in the article.

1 Every city is a place, a place we live in or a place we love, a place we are willing to leave or a place we hate. That means, that any place has multiple functions, visions, representations, emotional ties with people. A model of palimpsest is a one I use hereby to consider that inevitable multiplicity.

2 The structure of this article is as follows. At first I study the history of the “place as palimpsest” concept, trying to single out what it could mean to geographers and social scientists. The contradiction of the idea of symbolic construction of cultural landscapes originating from the new cultural / humanistic geography and the turn to everyday life practices of people shaping the landscape (typical for critical geographies) is in the focus of the 2 nd part of this paper. Finally I use an example of a cultural project I’ve designed in Moscow (Russia) in order to describe how this original place model and these contradictory concepts are shaped and contested in a Post-Socialist city.

Place as palimpsest

3 The term “palimpsest” originally described a medieval manuscript in which new text was written over previous text that had been erased. The word originates from the Greek “palin”+ “psaio” (“again I scrape”). What was peculiar about palimpsests was the fact that any layer didn’t fully erase their predecessors, so one could always recognize the previous layers of the text written earlier (Mitin, 2010). These specific features have made a palimpsest an important metaphor used in social sciences and the humanities to stress multiplicity of a text or phenomenon, to witness its layering and to single out some – by chance partly hidden – layers of reality.

4 The idea of palimpsest was borrowed by geographers from the theories of architecture and urban history. The original metaphor was used to describe the coexistence of material elements that originated in different historical periods in a building or an urban site. This is how A. Baglajewski describes Gdansk city in Poland:

“Textual Gdansk – to say it from the very beginning – is a place-palimpsest of mixed & hidden civilization and material cultural layers, a specific melting pot of traces, fragments, elements that may be pulled out of the recent new layers and read in different languages […]. Gdansk is made of those layers taken together, but not any of them alone” (Baglajewski, 1998, pp. 9-11).

5 This seems close to the classic interpretations of temporal changes in the cultural landscapes (Sauer, 1963) and sequent occupance (Whittlesey, 1929). However it was transformed into a certain model within historical geography by J. Vervloet in the 1980s only (Vervloet, 1984).

Figure 1. Historical-geographical model of landscape as palimpsest.

Figure 1. Historical-geographical model of landscape as palimpsest.

Vervloet, 1984, p. 2; translation: Urbanc et al., 2004, p. 119

6 The first geographer to call a landscape a palimpsest was obviously Donald Meinig (Meinig, 1979) who wrote in the preface to a famous volume “The Interpretation of Ordinary Landscapes” that “it is at once a panorama, a composition, a palimpsest, a microcosm; […] in every prospect there can be more and more that meets the eye” (Meinig, 1979, p. 6).

7 The meaning of a landscape as palimpsest was thus changed due to the cultural turn . The palimpsest “provides the possibility for erasure and overwriting and the co-existence of several different scripts, implying not just different historical eras, but several historical and contemporary actors as well” (Schein, 1997, p. 662). What Richard Schein meant here was the very multiplicity of human interpretations and representations of a place. The palimpsest model turns out to be not about the temporal changes alone, but also about the differences in the landscape as it is “read” by social groups and individuals, differentiated by identity, occupation, lifestyles, experience, imaginative power, and emotional factors (Mitin, 2010).

8 This turns any cultural landscape – no matter at what time period it originated – into “a sum of erasures, accretions, anomalies and redundancies over time” (Crang, 1998, p. 22). In terms of the “linguistic turn” (Lees, 2002) we are likely to call a landscape a text that can be read (Cosgrove, Jackson, 1987; Duncan, 1990; Lavrenova, 2010; Rowntree, 1986). As Lewis puts it, “reading landscapes is not as easy as reading books” as “ordinary landscape seems messy and disorganized, like a book with pages missing, torn and smudged; a book whose copy has been edited and re-edited by people with illegible handwriting” (Lewis, 1979, p. 12). The landscape is seen as a specific kind of text, in which “different layers or fragments of texts can get into conflict, questioning and contesting each other. Unavoidably inviting controversial interpretation, the reading of such a palimpsest is more like a process of multivocal, and often ambiguous, communication than an act of linear understanding. In modern and postmodern theory of text and communication, this process has been called ‘intertextuality’” (Brockmeier, 2001, p. 222).

9 The model of palimpsest turns the “landscape as text” into an intertext , that is a structure of mutual references of multiple meanings (Kristeva, 1969; Barthes, 1973). Thus I define palimpsest as “a conceptual model of a place as a multilayered structure that emphasizes the coexistence of multiple visions and impacts of different cultures on the landscape” (Mitin, 2010, p. 2111).

Urban cultural landscape: symbolic construction vs. lived practices

10 The model of a multivocal place as a palimpsest has become a result of cultural turn in geography, as I have mentioned above. The development of cultural geography from the classical theories of the beginning of the XX th century (Sauer, 1925) to the second half of the XX th century was contradictory, yet important. The cultural turn has become a main trend of that change (Gritzner, 1966; Norton, 1981; 1984; Mikesell, 1978; Zelinsky, 1973).

11 The representatives of the new cultural geography criticized the Sauerian Berkeley school for focusing “their studies on the material artifacts, exhibiting a curious and thoroughly antiquarian ‘object fetishism’ over such items as houses, barns, fences and gasoline stations” (Price, Lewis, 1993, p. 3). Instead, they regard the cultural landscape through its human interpretation, symbolization & signification (Brace, 2003; Robertson, Richards, 2003; Rowntree, Conkey, 1980). They stated that “the total cultural landscape is information stored in symbolic form” that “in part functions as a narrative” (Rowntree, Conkey, 1980, p. 461), and “the symbolic qualities of landscape, those which produce and sustain social meaning, have become a focus of research” as this “allows us to disclose the meanings that human groups attach to areas and places and to relate those meanings to other aspects and conditions of human existence” (Cosgrove, Jackson, 1987, p. 96).

12 This idea of place as being constructed has been developed in various directions inside humanistic geography (Tuan, 1974, 1976; Hall, 1978; Entrikin, 1985; Hasson, 1984). “Space is transformed into place as it acquires definition and meaning”, Yi-Fu Tuan (1977 [2002], p. 136) states. “The central concept is ‘meaning’, and indeed ‘place’ may be redefined as coming into existence through men according meaning to locations” (Jeans, 1979, pp. 207-208). Dennis Jeans found the exact words for that constructing perspective: “To make a place is to surround a locality with human meanings” (Jeans, 1979, p. 209).

13 My model of a palimpsest originates from the vision of a place as a “fuzzy set” of diverse interpretations, not only historically different elements, as legitimized by new cultural / humanistic geography. To touch upon the relations between various layers of one and the same place, the semiotic model of mythogeography is used (Mitin, 2007).

14 “Mythogeography’s main peculiarity is in the special vision of the ‘ filling ’ of every place with constructed realities , created with the help of mythological models of communication and the theory of the semiosis of modern myths” (Mitin, 2007, p. 215). The model combines several theoretical frameworks described below.

15 First, we need to look on each layer of that “place as palimpsest” alone. Yi-Fu Tuan regarded those layers as place narratives (Tuan, 1991), however I argue they are rather contexts , as each layer of the palimpsest is centered by a few unique dominant peculiarities of a place (Mitin, 2004). This idea is borrowed from the theory of regional geography .

16 Geographers have been traditionally saying about the process of construction of the texts describing this or that place through the theory of regional geography . Those layers are in fact special kinds of those texts. Different modes of geographical descriptions have been described throughout the XX th century (Darby, 1962; Davis, 1915; Finch, 1934; Hart, 1982; Lewis, 1985; Paterson, 1974). Being opposed by the positivist view of storing the entire data on any place in a form of encyclopedic classification, the idea of a good description as a geographer’s art of constructing a place is as follows.

“Good regional geography should begin with, and probably should be organized around, the dominant theme of each region, which of course will vary from region to region. No standard list of criteria or checklist of features-to-be observed can be universally applicable to the study of all regions […]. Features that are overwhelmingly important in one region may be completely missing in another, and the regional geographer should give pride of place in each region to its most important or significant features” (Hart, 1982, p. 23).

17 The history of Soviet human geography has been to a larger extent focused on the regions (though primarily economic ones) and regionalization. As a result, the theory of regional geography (“stranovedeniye”) has been productively discussed and developed (Baransky, 1950, 1980; Yefremov, 1981; Mashbits, 1998; Mironenko, 1992; Mitin, 2004). Combining the Anglo-American debates on the “highest form of geographer’s art” with those Russian concepts, I argue that “genuine complex geographical descriptions should be based on picking the dominant features of place and adopting the secondary features to the dominant with the usage of internal and external textual interconnections” (Mitin, 2007, p. 219).

18 For example, there is no use in making a full long description of St. Petersburg in Russia if our message is to stress its dominant feature in the sphere of tourism as a “cultural capital of Russia”. World famous State Hermitage, Peterhof and other museums, the historical intent of Peter the Great as the city founder to build a new capital “sticking” Russia to Europe, and the largely discussed special intellectual and authentic local identity would be those secondary features revealing and explaining the dominant one.

19 While that legitimizes certain rules of constructing each layer of place as palimpsest as a context, I need other theoretical frameworks to describe how the combination of various layers is created. The layers seem autonomous, and their hierarchy is easily changeable under the internal and external circumstances. However, the psychological essence of perception & imagination processes makes us always consider one of those layers the main – the dominant – one, though we may change our mind immediately. The palimpsest is a unite totality of those autonomous layers, that regards a place as multidimensional.

20 To understand how that totality is created through representations the semiotic model of semiosis is used to describe the interconnections between the autonomous layers of the palimpsest. A theory of modern mythologies as developed by Roland Barthes (1972 [1991]) turned out to be the best framework with each layer regarded as a certain spatial myth. Similarly to the place within humanistic geography, “mythical speech is made of a material which has already been worked on so as to make it suitable for communication” (Barthes, 1972 [1991], p. 108).

“In myth, we find again the tri-dimensional pattern […]: the signifier, the signified and the sign. But myth is a peculiar system, in that it is constructed from a semiological chain which existed before it: it is a second-order semiological system. That which is a sign (namely the associative total of a concept and an image) in the first system, becomes a mere signifier in the second. We must here recall that the materials of mythical speech (the language itself, photography, painting, posters, rituals, objects, etc.), however different at the start, are reduced to a pure signifying function as soon as they are caught by myth. Myth sees in them only the same raw material; their unity is that they all come down to the status of a mere language” (Barthes, 1972 [1991], p. 113).

Figure 2. Myth as a semiological system.

Figure 2. Myth as a semiological system.

Barthes, 1972 [1991], p. 113

21 The vision of urban imageries through myths’ semiosis explains how multiple representations are constructed through history, and the new ones replace the previous ones. For example the myth of St. Petersburg as the “ bandits’ capital of Russia ” emerging in the 1990s was to a much extent based on its strong opposition to the previously stated idea of country’s cultural capital.

22 The process of semiosis (Figure 2) is usable for the endless number of re-interpretations of spatial meanings , as the essence of any certain place (or any previously constructed place image) is reduced to a form of a myth that constructs a new meaning out of one and the same place (Mitin, 2004).

23 Combining (a) the idea of the cultural landscape as being constructed through symbolic values, (b) the theory of regional geographical descriptions, and (c) the semiotic model of modern mythologies altogether form a model of place as palimpsest as being created and re-created. However, it is to a much extent settled within a representational paradigm of geography.

24 Meanwhile cultural geographers’ focus on the representations has been changed to a concern about certain rematerializing of the discipline, or a call towards combining material and immaterial realms as typical for contemporary urban geography (Lees, 2002).

25 The cultural turn within non-representational geography is seen through the lens of what Henry Lefebvre names a double illusion (Lefebvre, 1991, p. 27). In Lefebvrian terms, cultural geography in the XX th century has executed a shift from the material / perceived space towards the conceptual space of representations, but the forthcoming critical paradigm is concerned about the third realm, that is the “representational spaces: the space directly lived through its associate images and symbols, and hence the space of ‘inhabitants’ and ‘users’” (Lefebvre, 1991, p. 39).

26 Critical geography uses that Lefebvrian triad to focus on the thirdspace (as Edward Soja names it), as “spaces of representation are seen by Lefebvre both as distinct from the other two spaces and as encompassing them, following his strategic use of social space in his preliminary thirding” (Soja, 1996, p. 67). Moving beyond that double illusion of real (Firstspace) and imagined (Secondspace), Soja stresses, that his thirdspace “contain all other real and imagined spaces simultaneously” (Soja, 1996, p. 69), it is a real-and-imagined space we live in .

27 While geographers call for rematerializing the discipline and the focus on what is “real” in that thirdspace, Lefebvre moves forward describing what kind of space it is. “Every society […] produces a space, its own space” (Lefebvre, 1991, p. 31), and the society we live in is named as completely urbanized, or simply “the urban society” (Lefebvre, 2003). While the previous mode of a city linked to the industrial society is seen as rationally planned and characterized by imposed homogeneity, the urban society and its space make a certain opposition to it.

“During this new period differences are known and recognized, mastered, conceived and signified. […] It is constituted by a renewed space-time, a topology that is distinct from agrarian (cyclic and juxtaposing local particularities) and industrial (tending towards homogeneity, toward a rational and planned unity of constraints) space-time. Urban space-time, as soon as we stop defining it in terms of industrial rationality – its project of homogenization – appears as a differential, each place and each moment existing only within a whole, through the contrasts and oppositions that connect it to, and distinguish it from, other places and moments […]. The urban space is complete contradiction” (Lefebvre, 1991, pp. 37-39).

28 The urban space is stressed to be complex, heterogeneous, multifaceted, interrelated. This vision of the new space constitution revives the idea of a palimpsest , as the latest embraces that very endless multiplicity co-existing in one and the same place. What is needed, is to shift the focus from those layers being constructed to the places being lived and experienced.

Mobile quest games in Moscow distant residential areas

29 In order to implement the model of “place as palimpsest” in practice in the sphere of urban cultural policy and to create that mix of representational and lived modes of a cultural landscape I elaborated a project of mobile quest games. It is aimed at the cultural development of distant residential areas of Moscow (Russia) city which lack both unique local imageries and place-specific practices. The process of creation of the images which stick to those placeless distant areas (as a part of project management) is regarded through the lens of symbolic construction of urban cultural landscapes. The process of local dwellers using the quest games and getting acquainted with the suggested unique features of their own home areas is regarded as lived consumption of places and changing the lived practices.

30 The project including the launch of 22 mobile quest games during 2015-2017 was implemented by “Moscow Agency for Area Development through Culture” (“MosART”) as the operator. The Agency was founded by the Department of Culture of the Moscow city Government as a cultural events’ management and methods’ development centre for promoting socio-cultural activity outside the centre of the city, in particular, outside the Third Ring Road. “MosART” has been an official name of the Agency till 2016, when it was renamed into “Cultural Centre ‘Ivanovsky’” without changes in its main functions.

31 Mobile quest games were suggested as an alternative to traditional excursions , as the areas outside of the city centre have been traditionally out of tourist interest and were not regarded as important leisure sights by local residents. There are a few sights outside the Third Ring Road, which are considered to be tourist objects, like Tsaritsyno or Kolomenskoye museums and parks. Those popular places were intentionally excluded from the project.

32 Traditional excursions are hardly possible in the areas with poor tourist infrastructure, the attractions in physically poor condition, located far one from another, and/or representing industrial / engineering heritage, or traditional residential blocks from the XX th century, that are rarely considered valuable as tourist destinations in contemporary Russia. Those objects and areas were intentionally chosen for the project.

33 Muscovites are considered the main target audience of the project according to the Department of Culture’s policy agenda.

34 New cultural / humanistic geography, the ideas of symbolic construction of tourist sights and the model of “place as palimpsest” were considered to be the theoretical background of the project. It was thought to be a means of creating new attractive sights in distant residential areas and constructing the new local images which could become important parts of local imageries, areas’ branding and promoting local identities.

35 All mobile quest games are promoted at the Agency’s website ( https://ivcenter.ru/​project/​vse-kvesti/​ ) and through Moscow city official cultural and tourist websites and social media. As soon as a user chooses one of the quest games from the website, s/he is forwarded to a web page of “Street Adventure” company, a project partner responsible for technical support. In a few minutes after being registered at that web page the user receives the individual link to start the quest game online. Users follow the directions from that link, receive the questions and insert their answers online using their tablets or smartphones, and thus follow the route of the quest game. Apart from providing questions and checking the answers, the online interface provides the attractive information about the places visited, that might be useful to answer the questions, but is more likely to serve to create the certain images of the places and the area as a whole.

36 An example of that kind of a small text about “Fabrika 1 Maya” settlement, located in the Novomoskovsky district of Moscow in some 30 km from the Kremlin, that became a part of the city in 2012 only, is below.

A cloth factory opposite has an interesting history. It was first mentioned in 1853 as a possession of D.A. Okulova. She married Nikolay Pavlovich Shipov, a colonel and a real state councilor famous for the agricultural innovations he implemented in his Ostashevo estate near Mozhaysk, Moscow region. Okulova was also acquainted to Pyotr Vyazemsky, a poet and an owner of the neighboring Ostafyevo estate that we have just visited. The factory was sold to engineer Ivan Ivanovich Baskakov in 1879, however there is an evidence that Baskakov reconstructed the estate and built a new factory. He also built a dam across the Desna river, though the one you’ll see as you walk a hundred meters upstream has been seriously rebuilt later on. Baskakov also constructed the manufacturer’s estate and the red-brick barracks for the workers. Some of them are still used as residential houses. Those were probably built before 1912, though we can’t know that for sure. However, there is a building further on with a construction year you can know for sure. Find it and insert that year as an answer! Tip 1: Walk between the houses on the Desna river bank. Tip 2: Find a house No. 3. Answer: 1927.

37 The tips from the example are used if the user fails to find the right answer or loses the way.

38 Some 22 mobile quest games were launched for three years, and 34 000+ people played at least one of them. The exact user statistical data is below (Table 1).

Table 1. User statistics for mobile quest games by “MosART”, by December 31, 2017.

39 The analysis shows, that in spite of the effort to promote the most distant and unknown areas of the city, the most closely connected to the Third Ring Road and the most well-known areas were the most popular. Vorobyovy hills seem the best evidence here: though the route passes through the historic picturesque park, the viewpoint on top of Vorobyovy hills is a known tourist sight, and its name attracts the users to this mobile quest game (No. 8 in Table 1). However, I argue that by means of the project even the least attended areas could be transformed from real “ non-places ” into certain meaningful places , though not widely known and recognized.

Lived practices of the quest game users

40 The idea of the project of mobile quest games was in fact to create a new layer of place as palimpsest. The possible influence of those new representations towards lived practices of people is critically important in the light of critical non-representational urban geography. An experiment was held in order to study those effects of mobile quest games towards everyday lived practices of its users. I needed to check if there was any influence of playing the quest game on (a) the imagery of the area, and (b) the estimations of its comfort for everyday living. 60 students of the Academy of Public Administration of Moscow region were asked to pass 2 quest games in the Northeastern district of Moscow, not far from their campus and dormitories, and share their statements and images of Sviblovo area before and after the experiment. Sentence completion and drawing tests were used as an initial point of the research to learn about the current imageries of Sviblovo area. The survey was held for the participants of one of 2 routes (N=32) to check if the imagery was changed. Observation and in-depth interviews (N=12) were used to witness the essence of the new local images and the new lived practices possibly emerging after the completion of the game.

41 The initial image of the area (Figure 3) included the underground (metro) station and the Academy campus for the majority of informants. Those living in the dormitories also mentioned the shopping malls and the restaurants in the vicinity (an example is in the left part of the Figure 3). A small “Zodiac park” established in 2007 was mentioned a few times, as well as the Kapustinsky pond. Nothing more than some points of the students’ everyday routine was pictured.

Figure 3. A typical drawing of Sviblovo area.

Figure 3. A typical drawing of Sviblovo area.

Female, from Moscow region, living in the dormitory

42 Some of the students used Wikipedia data in the sentence completion test to mention the exact amount of inhabitants of the area, the Yauza river and the fact that the famous Soviet comedy “Operation Y and Shurik’s Other Adventures” was filmed there. Sviblovo was generally characterized in the sentence completion tests as a distant dull area of residential blocks with no specific sights to visit .

43 The final image was influenced by the mobile quest game. 66% of quest users agreed that their image of the area was changed after the game according to the survey conducted, and 75% of the latter said it has become more positive .

44 The interviews could help me to understand the substantial changes. The users mentioned the old estate, the houses filmed in the Soviet comedy movie, some street-art objects, which were a surprise for them in their neighborhood:

“We didn’t feel anything special at first. It was all ours, so familiar. But it was astonishing to see that street-art object, as I’ve never noticed it before” (Female, from Central Asia, living in the dormitory).
“I would say, I have opened Sviblovo from so different sides after all, though a heavy rain started. It was [previously] just a place where I study, and that’s all of it” (Female, from Moscow, living in another district of Moscow).

45 However, the idea of Sviblovo as a historic neighborhood that could be “read” through literary sources and famous movies was not transferred to the quest users.

46 The picturesque Yauza river bank was one of the most discussed places together with a neighboring old estate. There was even an idea for new everyday practices mentioned in one of the interviews:

“It would be not bad to go for a walk on those grounds near the [Yauza] river, may be in summertime with my boyfriend. It creates a special atmosphere, [it is] helpful to forget about the routine” (Female, from another region, living in the dormitory).

47 However this was the only mention of any possible changes in the lived uses of a place. The transformation of the local imagery, which I would regard as the influence of a new representation constructed, was hardly influential enough to give birth to the new practices which remained unchanged.

48 I have discussed a model of place as palimpsest as a possible framework to study and to transform urban cultural landscapes in the Post-Socialist cities with Moscow distant residential areas as an example.

49 New cultural / humanistic geography, semiotics and theory of regional geography taken together make a unique framework for the original “ palimpsestic” vision of any place and the tool of constructing new layers of that palimpsest.

50 Place as palimpsest is a useful tool in the sphere of cultural management to legitimate the “space production” and the construction of attractive tourist sights. Deep insights into Moscow city distant residential areas’ imageries make the experience of the mobile quest games valuable for the locals, rediscovering their neighborhoods, traditionally regarded as standardized “non-places”, as becoming rich in symbolic capital.

51 The palimpsestic idea of multiplicity of layers is especially useful in the Post-Socialist cities , as they are produced and reproduced through opposing, exaggerated, outdated or imposed imageries, and the meaning of Post-Socialism itself is multi-layered (Gentile, 2018). Mimi Urbanc and her colleagues studying the Post-Socialist landscape transformation focus on a certain value change creating that multiplicity:

“Some landscape elements have remained the same through all the changing socio-economic formations. Some others have been forgotten or destroyed by the emerging formations. Some have been replaced by other objects. Yet others have retained their physical structure but the meanings have changed. […] What is valuable will be retained, what is not valuable will disappear. But value systems keep changing, too. Some elements were considered valuable during the national states period then ignored during the Soviet era and became valuable again after independence” (Urbanc et al., 2004, p. 119).

52 However, my conclusion is rather contradictory due to the results of the empirical research. Trying to unite the majorly “ constructing” perspective of new cultural geography and “ living” perspective of critical geography is still a challenging task for urban cultural agenda. The connections of place images and local practices are not that close , as one could expect.

53 Nevertheless, I argue, that the palimpsest metaphor originated from the new cultural geography may be revived through the critical approach as a model embracing the multivocal multiplicity of agents, everyday strategies, lived practices and (re)constructed images of Post-Socialist cities, characterized by representational & non-representational effects intertwined.

54 I would definitely continue studying that effects in Moscow distant residential areas using a model of palimpsest, however, a more complex approach combining cultural geographical research and cultural management with broader horizons of place management seem necessary and prospective.

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Ivan Mitin , «  Constructing urban cultural landscapes & living in the palimpsests: a case of Moscow city (Russia) distant residential areas  » ,  Belgeo [En ligne], 4 | 2018, mis en ligne le 05 novembre 2018 , consulté le 22 février 2024 . URL  : http://journals.openedition.org/belgeo/28126 ; DOI  : https://doi.org/10.4000/belgeo.28126

National Research University Higher School of Economics (Moscow), [email protected]

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Yeast Communities of the Moscow City Soils

  • Experimental Articles
  • Published: 02 June 2018
  • Volume 87 , pages 407–415, ( 2018 )

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  • A. N. Tepeeva 1 ,
  • A. M. Glushakova 1 &
  • A. V. Kachalkin 1  

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Yeast abundance and diversity were studied in the soils (topsoil) of Moscow city: urban soils under lawn vegetation and close to the areas of household waste disposal, as well as in zonal soddy-podzolic soils (retisols) in parks (Losiny Ostrov and Izmailovo). The numbers of soil yeasts were similar in all studied urban biocenoses (on average ~3.5 × 10 3 CFU/g). From all studied soils, 54 yeast species were isolated. The highest yeast diversity was found in the soils adjacent to the areas of household waste storage. Soils from different urban sites were found to have different ratios of ascomycetous and basidiomycetous yeasts: basidiomycetes predominated in urban soils under lawn vegetation, while in the areas close to the waste disposal sites their share was considerably lower. The differences between the studied urban soils were also found in the structure of soil yeast complexes. In urban soils with high anthropogenic impact, the isolation frequency of clinically important yeast species ( Candida parapsilosis , C. tropicalis , Diutina catenulata , and Pichia kudriavzevii ) was as high as 35% of all studied samples, while its share in the community was 17%. The factors responsible for development of specific features of yeast communities in various urban soils are discussed in the paper.

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Tepeeva, A.N., Glushakova, A.M. & Kachalkin, A.V. Yeast Communities of the Moscow City Soils. Microbiology 87 , 407–415 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1134/S0026261718030128

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College of Education

Lauren Irwin poses with Jodi Linley outside The Englert after graduating from her doctorate program.

Lauren Irwin wins dissertation of the year award from the College Student Educators International

University of Iowa College of Education alumna Lauren Irwin was awarded the Marylu McEwen Dissertation of the Year Award from College Student Educators International.

Irwin received her doctorate in  Higher Education and Student Affairs  from the UI College of Education's Department of Educational Policy and Leadership Studies in May 2023. She is now an assistant professor in the Higher Education and College Student Personnel programs at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.  

Jodi Linley , associate professor of Higher Education and Student Affairs, was Irwin’s dissertation advisor and nominated her for the award. She says Irwin continuously proves she is a highly-skilled researcher and critical scholar.

Lauren Irwin smiles in a professional portrait.

“Dr. Lauren Irwin has excelled in all levels of her higher education and professional life, and I am so excited to see her scholarship recognized for the exceptional work it is,” Linley says. “Her study will no doubt improve social justice efforts on college campuses. Her study also holds theoretical significance; to my knowledge, this is the first operationalization of Victor Ray’s theory of racialized organizations in a student affairs context. She is setting an example for other student affairs scholars to do systemic, organizational analyses of our functional areas.” 

Irwin’s dissertation studies the impact of whiteness and racism in leadership programs. She evaluated three college campuses that claim to center social justice in their leadership programs. One campus was a large predominately white research institution on the East Coast, another was a large public Minority-Serving Institution with a racially diverse body in the Western U.S., and the third was a small Catholic, predominately white liberal arts college in the Midwest. 

Irwin found that the two predominantly white institutions benefited from resource stability in their leadership programs.

“Part of that actually came from donations from parents of students, particularly white and relatively affluent students, in those leadership programs,” Irwin says. 

Contrastingly, the leadership program at the Minority-Serving Institution consistently applied for external grants, which required extra time and resources for faculty and staff in those programs, Irwin says. 

Her dissertation also addresses how whiteness is normalized in these programs. 

“The thing that is unique is that all three of these campuses and programs were selected because of the ways that they claim to really center social justice or diversity in their programming,” Irwin says. “And what I found was that those efforts were often pretty disconnected from actual practice at predominately white institutions. Often, they continue to rely on leadership theories that were very much written from the experiences of white people, or didn't necessarily even consider identity or oppression.” 

Irwin says as someone who has been involved in College Student Educators International, previously known as the American College Personnel Association, since she was an undergraduate student, she was honored to receive this award for her dissertation. 

“To know that a group of scholars in my field saw that as worthy of recognition, and that as exemplary research is really exciting, really humbling,” Irwin says. “It feels like very energizing as I look forward in my career.”

Lauren Irwin on stage at her doctorate graduation ceremony.

Since graduating from the doctoral program at the College of Education in May 2023, Irwin has been working as an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. She is currently in her second semester on the tenure track. 

Before coming to the UI’s College of Education’s Department of Educational Policy and Leadership, Irwin received her Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology and Education Studies from UCLA and her Master of Arts in Student Affairs Administration from Michigan State University. She began her doctorate at a different program, but she transferred to the UI College of Education to be part of Iowa’ scholarly community and to focus on student affairs in her program. 

“I had the benefit of being in the most encouraging, supportive, and inspiring scholarly community that has really shaped who I am as a scholar now,” Irwin says. “I very much came here for folks doing incredible work in higher education, and got the chance to learn from great folks like Jodi Linley, Leslie Locke, Chris Ogren, Nick Bowman, Cassie Barnhardt, Sherry Watt, and Katie Broton, among others.”

Irwin says her time at the UI College of Education gave her great opportunities to engage with research and to graduate with a strong scholarly record, which helped her in the job market. 

“I have immense gratitude for the community of folks at Iowa who offered so much support and who continue to offer so much support and encouragement,” Irwin says.  

Dare to Discover banners hanging in Iowa City

Five UI College of Education students selected for OVPR’s 'Dare to Discover' campaign

jodi_linley_2015-crop.jpeg

Linley honored for dedication to students with M. L. Huit Faculty Award

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HESA Ph.D. student recognized for researching racial barriers in higher ed

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