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How to write a masters dissertation or thesis: top tips.

How to write a masters dissertation

It is completely normal to find the idea of writing a masters thesis or dissertation slightly daunting, even for students who have written one before at undergraduate level. Though, don’t feel put off by the idea. You’ll have plenty of time to complete it, and plenty of support from your supervisor and peers.

One of the main challenges that students face is putting their ideas and findings into words. Writing is a skill in itself, but with the right advice, you’ll find it much easier to get into the flow of writing your masters thesis or dissertation.

We’ve put together a step-by-step guide on how to write a dissertation or thesis for your masters degree, with top tips to consider at each stage in the process.

1. Understand your dissertation (or thesis) topic

There are slight differences between theses and dissertations , although both require a high standard of writing skill and knowledge in your topic. They are also formatted very similarly.

At first, writing a masters thesis can feel like running a 100m race – the course feels very quick and like there is not as much time for thinking! However, you’ll usually have a summer semester dedicated to completing your dissertation – giving plenty of time and space to write a strong academic piece.

By comparison, writing a PhD thesis can feel like running a marathon, working on the same topic for 3-4 years can be laborious. But in many ways, the approach to both of these tasks is quite similar.

Before writing your masters dissertation, get to know your research topic inside out. Not only will understanding your topic help you conduct better research, it will also help you write better dissertation content.

Also consider the main purpose of your dissertation. You are writing to put forward a theory or unique research angle – so make your purpose clear in your writing.

Top writing tip: when researching your topic, look out for specific terms and writing patterns used by other academics. It is likely that there will be a lot of jargon and important themes across research papers in your chosen dissertation topic. 

2. Structure your dissertation or thesis

Writing a thesis is a unique experience and there is no general consensus on what the best way to structure it is. 

As a postgraduate student , you’ll probably decide what kind of structure suits your research project best after consultation with your supervisor. You’ll also have a chance to look at previous masters students’ theses in your university library.

To some extent, all postgraduate dissertations are unique. Though they almost always consist of chapters. The number of chapters you cover will vary depending on the research. 

A masters dissertation or thesis organised into chapters would typically look like this: 

Write down your structure and use these as headings that you’ll write for later on.

Top writing tip : ease each chapter together with a paragraph that links the end of a chapter to the start of a new chapter. For example, you could say something along the lines of “in the next section, these findings are evaluated in more detail”. This makes it easier for the reader to understand each chapter and helps your writing flow better.

3. Write up your literature review

One of the best places to start when writing your masters dissertation is with the literature review. This involves researching and evaluating existing academic literature in order to identify any gaps for your own research.

Many students prefer to write the literature review chapter first, as this is where several of the underpinning theories and concepts exist. This section helps set the stage for the rest of your dissertation, and will help inform the writing of your other dissertation chapters.

What to include in your literature review

The literature review chapter is more than just a summary of existing research, it is an evaluation of how this research has informed your own unique research.

Demonstrate how the different pieces of research fit together. Are there overlapping theories? Are there disagreements between researchers?

Highlight the gap in the research. This is key, as a dissertation is mostly about developing your own unique research. Is there an unexplored avenue of research? Has existing research failed to disprove a particular theory?

Back up your methodology. Demonstrate why your methodology is appropriate by discussing where it has been used successfully in other research.

4. Write up your research

Your research is the heart and soul of your dissertation. Conducting your actual research is a whole other topic in itself, but it’s important to consider that your research design will heavily influence the way you write your final dissertation.

For instance, a more theoretical-based research topic might encompass more writing from a philosophical perspective. Qualitative data might require a lot more evaluation and discussion than quantitative research. 

Methodology chapter

The methodology chapter is all about how you carried out your research and which specific techniques you used to gather data. You should write about broader methodological approaches (e.g. qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods), and then go into more detail about your chosen data collection strategy. 

Data collection strategies include things like interviews, questionnaires, surveys, content analyses, discourse analyses and many more.

Data analysis and findings chapters

The data analysis or findings chapter should cover what you actually discovered during your research project. It should be detailed, specific and objective (don’t worry, you’ll have time for evaluation later on in your dissertation)

Write up your findings in a way that is easy to understand. For example, if you have a lot of numerical data, this could be easier to digest in tables.

This will make it easier for you to dive into some deeper analysis in later chapters. Remember, the reader will refer back to your data analysis section to cross-reference your later evaluations against your actual findings – so presenting your data in a simple manner is beneficial.

Think about how you can segment your data into categories. For instance, it can be useful to segment interview transcripts by interviewee. 

Top writing tip : write up notes on how you might phrase a certain part of the research. This will help bring the best out of your writing. There is nothing worse than when you think of the perfect way to phrase something and then you completely forget it.

5. Discuss and evaluate

Once you’ve presented your findings, it’s time to evaluate and discuss them.

It might feel difficult to differentiate between your findings and discussion sections, because you are essentially talking about the same data. The easiest way to remember the difference is that your findings simply present the data, whereas your discussion tells the story of this data.

Your evaluation breaks the story down, explaining the key findings, what went well and what didn’t go so well.

In your discussion chapter, you’ll have chance to expand on the results from your findings section. For example, explain what certain numbers mean and draw relationships between different pieces of data.

Top writing tip: don’t be afraid to point out the shortcomings of your research. You will receive higher marks for writing objectively. For example, if you didn’t receive as many interview responses as expected, evaluate how this has impacted your research and findings. Don’t let your ego get in the way!

6. Write your introduction

Your introduction sets the scene for the rest of your masters dissertation. You might be wondering why writing an introduction isn't at the start of our step-by-step list, and that’s because many students write this chapter last.

Here’s what your introduction chapter should cover:

Problem statement

Research question

Significance of your research

This tells the reader what you’ll be researching as well as its importance. You’ll have a good idea of what to include here from your original dissertation proposal , though it’s fairly common for research to change once it gets started.

Writing or at least revisiting this section last can be really helpful, since you’ll have a more well-rounded view of what your research actually covers once it has been completed and written up.

How to write a masters dissertation

Masters dissertation writing tips

When to start writing your thesis or dissertation.

When you should start writing your masters thesis or dissertation depends on the scope of the research project and the duration of your course. In some cases, your research project may be relatively short and you may not be able to write much of your thesis before completing the project. 

But regardless of the nature of your research project and of the scope of your course, you should start writing your thesis or at least some of its sections as early as possible, and there are a number of good reasons for this:

Academic writing is about practice, not talent. The first steps of writing your dissertation will help you get into the swing of your project. Write early to help you prepare in good time.

Write things as you do them. This is a good way to keep your dissertation full of fresh ideas and ensure that you don’t forget valuable information.

The first draft is never perfect. Give yourself time to edit and improve your dissertation. It’s likely that you’ll need to make at least one or two more drafts before your final submission.

Writing early on will help you stay motivated when writing all subsequent drafts.

Thinking and writing are very connected. As you write, new ideas and concepts will come to mind. So writing early on is a great way to generate new ideas.

How to improve your writing skills

The best way of improving your dissertation or thesis writing skills is to:

 Finish the first draft of your masters thesis as early as possible and send it to your supervisor for revision. Your supervisor will correct your draft and point out any writing errors. This process will be repeated a few times which will help you recognise and correct writing mistakes yourself as time progresses.

If you are not a native English speaker, it may be useful to ask your English friends to read a part of your thesis and warn you about any recurring writing mistakes. Read our section on English language support for more advice. 

Most universities have writing centres that offer writing courses and other kinds of support for postgraduate students. Attending these courses may help you improve your writing and meet other postgraduate students with whom you will be able to discuss what constitutes a well-written thesis.

Read academic articles and search for writing resources on the internet. This will help you adopt an academic writing style, which will eventually become effortless with practice.

Keep track of your bibliography 

When studying for your masters dissertation, you will need to develop an efficient way of organising your bibliography – this will prevent you from getting lost in large piles of data that you’ll need to write your dissertation. 

The easiest way to keep the track of all the articles you have read for your research is to create a database where you can summarise each article/chapter into a few most important bullet points to help you remember their content. 

Another useful tool for doing this effectively is to learn how to use specific reference management software (RMS) such as EndNote. RMS is relatively simple to use and saves a lot of time when it comes to organising your bibliography. This may come in very handy, especially if your reference section is suspiciously missing two hours before you need to submit your dissertation! 

Avoid accidental plagiarism

Plagiarism may cost you your postgraduate degree and it is important that you consciously avoid it when writing your thesis or dissertation. 

Occasionally, postgraduate students commit plagiarism unintentionally. This can happen when sections are copy and pasted from journal articles they are citing instead of simply rephrasing them. Whenever you are presenting information from another academic source, make sure you reference the source and avoid writing the statement exactly as it is written in the original paper.

What kind of format should your thesis have?

How to write a masters dissertation

Read your university’s guidelines before you actually start writing your thesis so you don’t have to waste time changing the format further down the line. However in general, most universities will require you to use 1.5-2 line spacing, font size 12 for text, and to print your thesis on A4 paper. These formatting guidelines may not necessarily result in the most aesthetically appealing thesis, however beauty is not always practical, and a nice looking thesis can be a more tiring reading experience for your postgrad examiner .

When should I submit my thesis?

The length of time it takes to complete your MSc or MA thesis will vary from student to student. This is because people work at different speeds, projects vary in difficulty, and some projects encounter more problems than others. 

Obviously, you should submit your MSc thesis or MA thesis when it is finished! Every university will say in its regulations that it is the student who must decide when it is ready to submit. 

However, your supervisor will advise you whether your work is ready and you should take their advice on this. If your supervisor says that your work is not ready, then it is probably unwise to submit it. Usually your supervisor will read your final thesis or dissertation draft and will let you know what’s required before submitting your final draft.

Set yourself a target for completion. This will help you stay on track and avoid falling behind. You may also only have funding for the year, so it is important to ensure you submit your dissertation before the deadline – and also ensure you don’t miss out on your graduation ceremony ! 

To set your target date, work backwards from the final completion and submission date, and aim to have your final draft completed at least three months before that final date.

Don’t leave your submission until the last minute – submit your work in good time before the final deadline. Consider what else you’ll have going on around that time. Are you moving back home? Do you have a holiday? Do you have other plans?

If you need to have finished by the end of June to be able to go to a graduation ceremony in July, then you should leave a suitable amount of time for this. You can build this into your dissertation project planning at the start of your research.

It is important to remember that handing in your thesis or dissertation is not the end of your masters program . There will be a period of time of one to three months between the time you submit and your final day. Some courses may even require a viva to discuss your research project, though this is more common at PhD level . 

If you have passed, you will need to make arrangements for the thesis to be properly bound and resubmitted, which will take a week or two. You may also have minor corrections to make to the work, which could take up to a month or so. This means that you need to allow a period of at least three months between submitting your thesis and the time when your program will be completely finished. Of course, it is also possible you may be asked after the viva to do more work on your thesis and resubmit it before the examiners will agree to award the degree – so there may be an even longer time period before you have finished.

How do I submit the MA or MSc dissertation?

Most universities will have a clear procedure for submitting a masters dissertation. Some universities require your ‘intention to submit’. This notifies them that you are ready to submit and allows the university to appoint an external examiner.

This normally has to be completed at least three months before the date on which you think you will be ready to submit.

When your MA or MSc dissertation is ready, you will have to print several copies and have them bound. The number of copies varies between universities, but the university usually requires three – one for each of the examiners and one for your supervisor.

However, you will need one more copy – for yourself! These copies must be softbound, not hardbound. The theses you see on the library shelves will be bound in an impressive hardback cover, but you can only get your work bound like this once you have passed. 

You should submit your dissertation or thesis for examination in soft paper or card covers, and your university will give you detailed guidance on how it should be bound. They will also recommend places where you can get the work done.

The next stage is to hand in your work, in the way and to the place that is indicated in your university’s regulations. All you can do then is sit and wait for the examination – but submitting your thesis is often a time of great relief and celebration!

Some universities only require a digital submission, where you upload your dissertation as a file through their online submission system.

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thesis for msc

  • To get a degree - topic should be difficult enough, but manageable too.
  • To enjoy the work - topic that you are truly interested in, something that you will not grow bored of after a short period of time.
  • To get a job afterward - if you know what specifically you want to do after your studies and/or for which company, it might be useful to choose a topic, that will help with this goal.
  • To be useful - thesis might actually be useful to help to make the world a little better place.
  • Try thinking about your favorite subject of study - it may be a particular author, theory, time period, etc. Imagine how you might further the study of that subject.
  • You might consider skimming through papers you wrote for your graduate courses and see if there is any apparent topic that you tend to gravitate towards.
  • Consult with faculty members, favorite professors. They might have some good suggestions to write about. Generally, you'll be required to meet with your thesis advisor at least once before you start working.
  • Consider consulting with industry partners. Your favorite company might have some work to do which might be done as a master's thesis. This might also help you get a job within the company afterward and maybe even some money for the thesis.
  • If you want to help the world to be a better place, you might want to consult with your local non-profits and charities or check the Internet for possible thesis topics to write about.
  • 3 Choose the right topic. From the possible topics generated in the previous step, find the one which best fits the objectives from the first step, especially the objectives most important to you. Make sure that you have a clear, specific, and organized plan on how to write a master's thesis which you will be able to then defend.

Step 4 Choose your thesis question.

  • Make sure that your question and the answers provided will provide original content to the body of research in existence. A judicious question will also keep research focused, organized, and interesting.
  • Once you've formulated your topic and direction of inquiry, try formulating 5-10 different questions around your intended research. This forces you to think flexibly about your topic and visualize how small changes in wording can change the trajectory of your research.

Step 5 Conduct your research.

  • Usually, your committee chair will be in place before you formally start your thesis. They can help guide you and provide input into your project, so the earlier you can get their commitment, the better.
  • Nothing is more frustrating than your thesis progress being held up by a professor who has too many obligations to make time to meet with you.

Selecting Your Texts

Step 1 Complete a literature review.

  • For example, a novel written by Ernest Hemingway or a scientific journal article in which new results are documented for the first time would both be considered primary sources.

Step 3 Choose your secondary sources.

  • For example, a book written about Ernest Hemingway's novel or a scientific journal article examining the findings of someone else's experiment would both be considered secondary sources.

Step 4 Manage your citations.

  • Use the in-text citation format appropriate to your discipline. [3] X Research source The most common formats are MLA, APA, and Chicago.
  • Create a coordinating works cited or reference entry for each source you cite in the text of your document or in a footnote.
  • Consider using a citation management software such as EndNote, Mendeley, or Zotero. These will enable you to insert and move citations within your word processor program and will automatically populate a works cited or reference page for you.

Planning an Outline

Step 1 Know the requirements for your field/department.

  • Qualitative. This type of thesis involves completing a project that is exploratory, analytical, or creative in some way. Usually, students in the humanities will complete this kind of thesis.
  • Quantitative. This type of thesis involves conducting experiments, measuring data, and recording results. Students in the sciences usually complete this kind of thesis.

Step 2 Nail down your thesis idea.

  • Signature page (with the completed signatures of your advising committee - usually attained at the defense, or after the project is deemed complete )
  • Abstract - this is a short (one paragraph or so) description/summary of the work completed in your thesis
  • Table of Contents (with page numbers)
  • Introduction
  • Body of paper
  • Works Cited or Bibliography
  • Any necessary appendices or endnotes

Moving through the Writing Process

Step 1 Make a schedule.

  • If you do not already have a review of literature written, it’s time to do your research! The review of literature is essentially a summary of all of the existing scholarship about your topic with plenty of direct quotations from the primary and secondary sources that you’re referencing.

Step 8 Contextualize your work.

Finalizing Your Thesis

Step 1 Compare your draft with your university's requirements.

  • Many departments or programs provide a document template for theses and dissertations. If you have one of these, it may be easiest to use such a template from the beginning of your work (rather than copying and pasting your writing into it).

Step 2 Re-read the entire thesis for correctness.

  • Alternatively, ask a trusted colleague or friend to read over your thesis to help you catch any minor grammar/spelling/punctuation errors and typos.

Step 3 Follow all printing guidelines according to your department's policies.

  • Some institutions require you to submit your thesis for a formatting check prior to uploading the document to ProQuest. Be sure to check with your department’s Director of Graduate Studies for specific instructions.
  • Be aware of thesis submission deadlines, which are often well in advance of your graduation date. Late submission of your thesis may force you to push back your graduation date, which may affect your employment or continuing graduate studies.

Masters Thesis Outline

thesis for msc

Expert Q&A

Christopher Taylor, PhD

  • Remember why you are writing a Master's thesis and who will want to read and use the material. You write a Master's thesis for members of your community, so keep in mind that they will have extensive knowledge and experience before reading your work. Don't bore them with unnecessary material. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0
  • Choosing the perfect question before starting research will prevent frustration and save time. Rigorous effort on finding the perfect question is probably the most important task when learning how to write a Master's thesis. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0
  • Consult other people who have completed a Master's thesis and obtained a Master's degree. It can be a long, grueling process, and having the support and advice of someone who has already done it can be very valuable. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0

thesis for msc

You Might Also Like

Restate a Thesis

  • ↑ https://umb.libguides.com/PrimarySources/secondary
  • ↑ https://www.scribbr.com/citing-sources/in-text-citation-styles/
  • ↑ https://www.unk.edu/academics/gradstudies/admissions/grad-files/Grad%20Files/ThesisGdlnsFinal08.pdf
  • ↑ https://u.osu.edu/hackingthethesis/managing-stuff/your-content/outline/
  • ↑ http://www.imm.dtu.dk/~janba/MastersThesisAdvice.pdf

About This Article

Christopher Taylor, PhD

To write a master's thesis, make it a goal to write 500 words every day, which will help you meet your deadline without having to rush at the last minute. It's also helpful if you work in 25-minute increments and take a 5-minute break in between, which will make your work sessions less overwhelming. Also, figure out a writing time that works best for you, whether it's in the morning or at night, and stick with it so you're more productive. For more help writing your master's thesis, like how to make an outline, keep reading! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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Thesis Examples

Latex Example (shortened M.Sc. with urthesis.sty)  (ZIP)

Latex Example (complete M.Sc. with no .sty)  (ZIP)

How to Write a M.Sc. Thesis

The following guide to writing an M.Sc. thesis was prepared by Howard Hamilton and Brien Maguire, based on previous guides by Alan Mackworth (University of British Columbia) and Nick Cercone (Simon Fraser University), with their permission.

Quick Guide to the M.Sc. Thesis

An acceptable M.Sc. thesis in Computer Science should attempt to satisfy one or more of the following criteria:

  • Original research results are explained clearly and concisely.
  • The thesis explains a novel exploratory implementation or a novel empirical study whose results will be of interest to the Computer Science community in general and to a portion of the Computer Science community in particular, e.g., Artificial Intelligence, Computational Complexity, etc.
  • Novel implementation techniques are outlined, generalized, and explained.
  • Theoretical results are obtained, explained, proven, and (worst, best, average) case analysis is performed where applicable.
  • The implementation of a practical piece of nontrivial software whose availability could have some impact on the Computer Science community. Examples are a distributed file system for a mobile computing environment and a program featuring the application of artificial intelligence knowledge representation and planning techniques to intelligent computer assisted learning software.

Writing an acceptable thesis can be a painful and arduous task, especially if you have not written much before. A good methodology to follow, immediately upon completion of the required courses, is to keep a paper or electronic research notebook and commit to writing research oriented notes in it every day. From time to time, organize or reorganize your notes under headings that capture important categories of your thoughts. This journal of your research activities can serve as a very rough draft of your thesis by the time you complete your research. From these notes to a first M.Sc. thesis draft is a much less painful experience than to start a draft from scratch many months after your initial investigations. To help structure an M.Sc. thesis, the following guide may help.

One Formula for an M.Sc. Thesis for Computer Science

Chapter 1 Introduction: This chapter contains a discussion of the general area of research which you plan to explore in the thesis. It should contain a summary of the work you propose to carry out and the motivations you can cite for performing this work. Describe the general problem that you are working towards solving and the specific problem that you attempt to solve in the thesis. For example, the general problem may be finding an algorithm to help an artificial agent discover a path in a novel environment, and the specific problem may be evaluating the relative effectiveness and efficiency of five particular named approaches to finding the shortest path in a graph where each node is connected to at most four neighbours, with no knowledge of the graph except that obtained by exploration. This chapter should also explain the motivations for solving each of the general problem and your specific problem. The chapter should end with a guide to the reader on the composition and contents of the rest of the thesis, chapter by chapter. If there are various paths through the thesis, these should also be explained in Chapter 1.

Chapter 2 Limited Overview of the Field: This chapter contains a specialized overview of that part of a particular field in which you are doing M.Sc. thesis research, for example, paramodulation techniques for automated theorem proving or bubble figure modelling strategies for animation systems. The survey should not be an exhaustive survey but rather should impose some structure on your field of research endeavour and carve out your niche within the structure you impose. You should make generous use of illustrative examples and citations to current research.

Chapter 3 My Theory/Solution/Algorithm/Program: This chapter outlines your proposed solution to the specific problem described in Chapter 1. The solution may be an extension to, an improvement of, or even a disproof of someone else's theory / solution / method / ...).

Chapter 4 Description of Implementation or Formalism: This chapter describes your implementation or formalism. Depending on its length, it may be combined with Chapter 3. Not every thesis requires an implementation. Prototypical implementations are common and quite often acceptable although the guiding criterion is that the research problem must be clearer when you've completed your task than it was when you started!

Chapter 5 Results and Evaluation: This chapter should present the results of your thesis. You should choose criteria by which to judge your results, for example, the adequacy, coverage, efficiency, productiveness, effectiveness, elegance, user friendliness, etc., and then clearly, honestly and fairly adjudicate your results according to fair measures and report those results. You should repeat, whenever possible, these tests against competing or previous approaches (if you are clever you will win hands down in such comparisons or such comparisons will be obviated by system differences). The competing or previous approaches you compare against must have been introduced in Chapter 2 (in fact that may be the only reason they actively appear in Chapter 2) and you should include pointers back to Chapter 2. Be honest in your evaluations. If you give other approaches the benefit of the doubt every time, and develop a superior technique, your results will be all the more impressive.

Chapter 6 Conclusions: This chapter should summarize the achievements of your thesis and discuss their impact on the research questions you raised in Chapter 1. Use the distinctive phrasing "An original contribution of this thesis is" to identify your original contributions to research. If you solved the specific problem described in Chapter 1, you should explicitly say so here. If you did not, you should also make this clear. You should indicate open issues and directions for further or future work in this area with your estimates of relevance to the field, importance and amount of work required.

References Complete references for all cited works. This should not be a bibliography of everything you have read in your area.

Appendices include technical material (program listings, output, graphical plots of data, detailed tables of experimental results, detailed proofs, etc.) which would disrupt the flow of the thesis but should be made available to help explain or provide details to the curious reader.

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Graduate Studies

Completing your masters degree – thesis.

Your first step regarding any questions with respect to writing your thesis is to  consult the  School of Graduate Studies’ Guide for the Preparation of Master’s and Doctoral Theses . All graduate theses must conform to the style and form requirements as detailed in the Guide.

Step 1. Write

Need help? If you have any questions or need assistance, please email [email protected].

1. Sample formats

Please consult the Guide for the Preparation of Theses for samples on how to format your thesis.

2. Referencing

Per the Guide for the Preparation of Theses: The text of the standard graduate thesis consists of the Introduction section or chapter, followed by several well-defined sections or chapters, which contain the research results, finishing with a Conclusion and Discussion section or chapter, or a summary statement of the results of the investigation. The List of References section (or bibliography) follows the text, and any appendices follow this.

Please consult the Guide for the Preparation of Theses for more detailed information on references and further resources that you can consult for referencing help.

3. Sandwich theses

If some of the research undertaken expressly for the degree has previously been published or prepared by the student as one or more journal articles, or parts of books, those items may be included within the thesis subject to the School of Graduate Studies’ regulations and to obtaining permission from the supervisory committee.

Please consult the Guide for the Preparation Theses – download via Quick Links to the right – for more detailed information on Sandwich Theses.

4. E-Thesis file name conventions

For your e-thesis to be published via MacSphere, the final version of your thesis should be named using the following file naming convention:

familyname_firstname_middleinitial_finalsubmissionyearmonth_degree

5. iThenticate - Plagiarism Checking Software

Effective December 1, 2023, all graduate students who initiate their defence on or after this date, are required to have their thesis run through McMaster’s plagiarism checking software, iThenticate.

iThenticate is a similarity detection tool meant to be used by researchers to check any original works that will be publicly released and who are concerned about potential plagiarism.

According to McMaster’s Research Plagiarism Checking Policy , it is expected that all graduate theses, shall be checked for plagiarism in compliance with this policy. Plagiarism checking is expected to occur prior to the coordination of the defence. Supervisors of Master’s students will need to sign a separate attestation sheet indicating that this has occurred and the document is satisfactory for public disclosure.

Your pre-defence thesis must be uploaded to iThenticate by your primary supervisor before you can initiate your Masters defence.

To protect graduate students’ privacy, only academic supervisors will have access to this software and will be responsible for uploading their student’s theses. It should not be used to check documents submitted to instructors as course assignments.

Step 2. Defend

Before initiating your defence, you should confirm with your supervisor and committee members if applicable, that you are ready to initiate. Your supervisor must also sign a separate attestation sheet prior to initiation, indicating that they have run your thesis through iThenticate and it is satisfactory for public disclosure. Once this is done, contact your department to confirm the program’s defence process. After a successful defence, the chair of the examination committee will inform you of thesis changes required by examiners. After all changes have been made, you must submit this completed form to the School of Graduate Studies for your final submission to be published to MacSphere.

Thesis Defence Submission

You can now check supervisor(s) and academic plan(s)

If any of this information is incorrect, you should contact to your program office before proceeding.

image of mosaic screen

Date and time

For dates and deadlines for defence and upcoming convocation ceremonies please refer to the Dates and Deadlines .

This step allows you to propose a date, time and location. This information will be confirmed by your program office, as they will receive notification after you have completed this process.

Please note your thesis title is required, but you can also add an abstract at this stage.

Please be aware after submission, your program office will assist you with the rest of the process and you should contact them to ensure that all arrangements have been put in place for your defence.

Image of Mosaic screen

Review and submit

You will be given an opportunity to review before submission. Once you have submitted you will receive a confirmation email that you have successfully initiated the process.

image of mosaic screen

Initiation of Masters defence process

Select My Academics in the Academic tab.

Screen shot of mosaic

Submission of Intent to initiate a Masters defence

Please consult with your department to see if they require that you initiate a Master’s Defence in Mosaic. All departments will need you to contact your Graduate Administrator to let them know you plan on defending your Master’s thesis. SGS does not require that you initiate a Master’s Defence in Mosaic but your department may have a different requirement. All PhD Defences MUST be initiated in Mosaic.

If your department requires that you initiate

You should select – Thesis Intent – Defend Thesis

This selection is only possible if you are enrolled a research plan type. If the student needs to switch to a research plan type, you should submit a service request for a plan change before initiating the thesis defence process.

Step 3. Submit

Please note that your degree requirements are considered complete when one electronic copy of the thesis, revised as directed by your defence examining committee, is submitted to the School of Graduate Studies through the E-Thesis Submission module in MacSphere.

Final thesis checklist

  • ONE electronic copy of the thesis, revised as recommended by the Thesis Examining Committee and approved by the Supervisor/Examining Committee
  • A standard 10-12 point font has been used
  • TOP and LEFT margins should be 3.8 cm, and RIGHT and BOTTOM margins should be 2.5 cm
  • Half-title page
  • Descriptive note
  • Abstract of 300 words or less
  • All preliminary pages are numbered in lower case Roman numerals
  • All pages must be numbered. The main body of the thesis, including text, bibliography and appendices, must be numbered continuously using Arabic numerals.

If you have not already done so, please submit the following forms to your department’s graduate administrator. They will submit them to the School of Graduate Studies on your behalf. Your final submission will not be considered complete without this documentation.

  • Final Thesis Submission Sheet
  • Copyright Permission Form
  • Library and Archives Canada Licence (PhD only)
  • McMaster University Licence

If you have completed all of the above requirements, you are ready to submit to your thesis.

E-thesis process

  • Submit your electronic thesis to MacSphere . Please follow the link and click on ‘Sign on to my MacSphere’ to deposit your thesis. Ensure your thesis is uploaded as a pdf document. Any supporting material can be uploaded in various formats.
  • E-thesis file name conventions. For your e-thesis to be published via MacSphere, the final version of your thesis should be named using the following file naming convention:

familyname_firstname_middleinitial_finalsubmissionyearmonth_degree.pdf

How to submit a thesis to MacSphere

  • Go to MacSphere.
  • On top/right corner click on Sign onto My MacSphere and log in with your MAC ID.
  • Click on Start a New Submission .
  • Select Collection: Open Access Dissertations and Theses , and click on Manual Submission to begin submitting your dissertation.
  • Complete the submission screens as prompted. Once you click on I Grant The License your dissertation will be submitted to SGS for processing.

Links to e-theses in MacSphere are available through a variety of tools. The contents of MacSphere are Google indexed, bringing McMaster scholarship to the attention of a broad range of users. Automated tools will continue to integrate e-theses with other print and electronic library resources in both the local catalogue and integrated catalogues, such as WorldCat.

Theses in physical formats have historically been low-use library materials, however digitized theses are receiving higher usage. Site statistics for theses currently available in McMaster’s MacSphere show several each month are downloaded more than 100 times and many others have multiple downloads.

Embargoed or withheld theses

Embargoed status is intended to protect rights for immediate commercial publication, to obtain a patent which may rise from the research, or as a result of any contract made with a third party. The student may request a postponement of digital publication for up to one year at the time of thesis submission to MacSphere – all such requests are automatically granted. Students who would like to extend this initial period of postponement must apply to the thesis coordinator who will forward the request to the Vice-Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies for determination of whether further publication postponement is warranted. This request must include a full description of why the additional delay is requested and what steps have been taken to address the issues that required the initial delay. No delay of publication more than two years from the initial submission will be permitted.

Please note that you and your supervisor must both sign the delay of publication area on your Final Thesis Submission Sheet. For more information, consult the School of Graduate Studies Calendar .

E-thesis binding

If you choose to have your thesis bound, binding service is available through  pageforpage.com . Via their website, you can print, bind and send your thesis where you wish. However, this is only an option; you may use any binding service that you prefer.

Optional Bound Copies – Should the supervisor and/or department require one or more bound paper copies of your thesis, it is the student’s responsibility to obtain and distribute these bound copies.

Apart from these considerations, the general guidelines for thesis production should be followed.

thesis for msc

BSc and MSc Thesis Subjects of the Bioinformatics Group

On this page you can find an overview of the BSc and MSc thesis topics that are offered by our group. The procedure to find the right thesis project for you is described below.

MSc thesis: In the Bioinformatics group, we offer a wide range of MSc thesis projects, from applied bioinformatics to computational method development. Here is a list of available MSc thesis projects . Besides the fact that these topics can be pursued for a MSc thesis, they can also be pursued as part of a Research Practice .

BSc thesis: As a BSc student you will work as an apprentice alongside one of the PhD students or postdocs in the group. You will work on your own research project, closely guided by your supervisor. You will be expected to work with several tools and/or databases, be creative and potentially overcome technical challenges. Below you will find short descriptions of the research projects of our PhDs and Postdocs. In addition you can take a look at the list of MSc thesis projects above.

Procedure for WUR students:

  • Request an intake meeting with one of our thesis coordinators by filling out the MSc intake form or BSc intake form and sending it to [email protected]
  • Contact project supervisors to discuss specific projects that fit your background and interest
  • Upon a match, take care of the required thesis administration together with your supervisor(s) and enroll in the thesis BrightSpace site to find more information on a thesis in the Bioinformatics group

Procedure for non-WUR students or students in other non-standard situations: We have limited space for interns from other institutes. If you are interested, please email our thesis coordinators at [email protected]; please attach your CV and indicate what are your main research interests.

BSc thesis topics

Integrative omics for the discovery of biosynthetic pathways in plants, molecular function prediction of natural products, from gene to networks: bridging the gap between two temperature-regulated plant reproductive traits.

Aalt-Jan van Dijk

Both ambient temperature-controlled flowering time and seed dormancy setting are temperature-regulated traits, which have been recently proposed to be interconnected. Plant reproductive success is the result of the evolution of complex gene regulatory networks. A challenge is to interconnect the variety of publicly available information, such as transcriptomic and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation data sets. We hypothesize that the plant reuses the same regulatory modules throughout development. For instance, the same transcription factor, can positively or negatively regulate a set of genes depending on its differential interaction with other proteins. In this project, you will perform a network analysis starting from a set of 306 genes known to be relevant for flowering, and from publicly accessible gene expression data of Arabidopsis fruit tissue. Initially, a search for available high quality data-sets will be performed, followed by network analyses. Prior knowledge will be used to evaluate predictions and to improve the accuracy in estimating the gene network structure. The ultimate goal is to build a highly connected network and to identify potential hubs in it. Potentially, once the network is fully built and validated, it can be further used for predicting relevant genes and their functions.

Genome-guided discovery and structure prediction of novel bio-surfactants

Linking the metabolome and genome, pangenomic applications for plants and pathogens, linking metagenomics and metatranscriptomics to study the endophytic root microbiome, exploiting variation in lettuce and its wild relatives.

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  • Knowledge Base
  • How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples

How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples

Published on January 11, 2019 by Shona McCombes . Revised on August 15, 2023 by Eoghan Ryan.

A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . It usually comes near the end of your introduction .

Your thesis will look a bit different depending on the type of essay you’re writing. But the thesis statement should always clearly state the main idea you want to get across. Everything else in your essay should relate back to this idea.

You can write your thesis statement by following four simple steps:

  • Start with a question
  • Write your initial answer
  • Develop your answer
  • Refine your thesis statement

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Table of contents

What is a thesis statement, placement of the thesis statement, step 1: start with a question, step 2: write your initial answer, step 3: develop your answer, step 4: refine your thesis statement, types of thesis statements, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about thesis statements.

A thesis statement summarizes the central points of your essay. It is a signpost telling the reader what the essay will argue and why.

The best thesis statements are:

  • Concise: A good thesis statement is short and sweet—don’t use more words than necessary. State your point clearly and directly in one or two sentences.
  • Contentious: Your thesis shouldn’t be a simple statement of fact that everyone already knows. A good thesis statement is a claim that requires further evidence or analysis to back it up.
  • Coherent: Everything mentioned in your thesis statement must be supported and explained in the rest of your paper.

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The thesis statement generally appears at the end of your essay introduction or research paper introduction .

The spread of the internet has had a world-changing effect, not least on the world of education. The use of the internet in academic contexts and among young people more generally is hotly debated. For many who did not grow up with this technology, its effects seem alarming and potentially harmful. This concern, while understandable, is misguided. The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its many benefits for education: the internet facilitates easier access to information, exposure to different perspectives, and a flexible learning environment for both students and teachers.

You should come up with an initial thesis, sometimes called a working thesis , early in the writing process . As soon as you’ve decided on your essay topic , you need to work out what you want to say about it—a clear thesis will give your essay direction and structure.

You might already have a question in your assignment, but if not, try to come up with your own. What would you like to find out or decide about your topic?

For example, you might ask:

After some initial research, you can formulate a tentative answer to this question. At this stage it can be simple, and it should guide the research process and writing process .

Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check.

Now you need to consider why this is your answer and how you will convince your reader to agree with you. As you read more about your topic and begin writing, your answer should get more detailed.

In your essay about the internet and education, the thesis states your position and sketches out the key arguments you’ll use to support it.

The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its many benefits for education because it facilitates easier access to information.

In your essay about braille, the thesis statement summarizes the key historical development that you’ll explain.

The invention of braille in the 19th century transformed the lives of blind people, allowing them to participate more actively in public life.

A strong thesis statement should tell the reader:

  • Why you hold this position
  • What they’ll learn from your essay
  • The key points of your argument or narrative

The final thesis statement doesn’t just state your position, but summarizes your overall argument or the entire topic you’re going to explain. To strengthen a weak thesis statement, it can help to consider the broader context of your topic.

These examples are more specific and show that you’ll explore your topic in depth.

Your thesis statement should match the goals of your essay, which vary depending on the type of essay you’re writing:

  • In an argumentative essay , your thesis statement should take a strong position. Your aim in the essay is to convince your reader of this thesis based on evidence and logical reasoning.
  • In an expository essay , you’ll aim to explain the facts of a topic or process. Your thesis statement doesn’t have to include a strong opinion in this case, but it should clearly state the central point you want to make, and mention the key elements you’ll explain.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . Everything else you write should relate to this key idea.

The thesis statement is essential in any academic essay or research paper for two main reasons:

  • It gives your writing direction and focus.
  • It gives the reader a concise summary of your main point.

Without a clear thesis statement, an essay can end up rambling and unfocused, leaving your reader unsure of exactly what you want to say.

Follow these four steps to come up with a thesis statement :

  • Ask a question about your topic .
  • Write your initial answer.
  • Develop your answer by including reasons.
  • Refine your answer, adding more detail and nuance.

The thesis statement should be placed at the end of your essay introduction .

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

McCombes, S. (2023, August 15). How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved February 22, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/thesis-statement/

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Master Thesis Presentation Template

A master thesis is crucial to rounding out your time and knowledge learned in your upper-level education courses. And now you can create an A-worthy thesis in half the time with Beautiful.ai’s master thesis template. 

Our customizable template has all the basics to help you sum up your comprehensive knowledge on the course and prove your skills in the field. Slides like literature review, research methodology, and a strong thesis conclusion will help you stand out to the panel or faculty members. A thoughtful master thesis presentation can help students wrap up their time in the program and apply their findings to their careers. 

Our master thesis template can also help you:

  • Customize your idea or statement for different audiences
  • Organize your argument in a thoughtful way
  • Provide a guide for the panel to read and follow along with

Use our template to create an effective master thesis presentation

A master thesis presentation is crucial to the success of your master’s program – one that requires a concise format, clear layout, and seamless flow. That’s why our template includes everything you need to create an effective presentation. Whether you need to organize your argument in a meaningful way or showcase more resources, you can quickly bring your visions to life with these slides::

Title Slide

Tips to create an impactful master thesis presentation

As you use this template to craft your master thesis presentation, keep these do’s and don’ts in mind:

Condensing hours and hours of research can be daunting. Build an outline or table of contents first, then simply stick to that structure as you create your presentation.

It can be easy to get caught up in your research and findings, but don’t forget to answer critical questions like, ‘Why is this important?’ and ‘What results have you achieved?’

Remember: You aren’t recreating your entire thesis into a visual presentation. Limit the amount of content and data you add to each slide.

Your master thesis presentation is your chance to share all of your hard work. Don’t be afraid to showcase bits of your personality throughout.

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Home > Engineering > MIE > ME_THESES

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

Mechanical Engineering Masters Theses Collection

Theses from 2023 2023.

Device Design for Inducing Aneurysm-Susceptible Flow Conditions Onto Endothelial Cells , hans f. foelsche, Mechanical Engineering

Thermal Conductivity and Mechanical Properties of Interlayer-Bonded Graphene Bilayers , Afnan Mostafa, Mechanical Engineering

Wind-Wave Misalignment Effects on Multiline Anchor Systems for Floating Offshore Wind Turbines , Doron T. Rose, Mechanical Engineering

Theses from 2022 2022

A Simplified Fluid Dynamics Model of Ultrafiltration , Christopher Cardimino, Mechanical Engineering

Local Nanomechanical Variations of Cold-sprayed Tantalum Coatings , Dhrubajyoti Chowdhury, Mechanical Engineering

Aerodynamically Augmented Air-Hockey Pucks , Madhukar Prasad, Mechanical Engineering

Analysis of Low-Induction Rotors for Increased Power Production , Jack E. Rees, Mechanical Engineering

Application of the New IEC International Design Standard for Offshore Wind Turbines to a Reference Site in the Massachusetts Offshore Wind Energy Area , Samuel C. Roach, Mechanical Engineering

Applications of Thermal Energy Storage with Electrified Heating and Cooling , Erich Ryan, Mechanical Engineering

Theses from 2021 2021

Design and Testing of a Foundation Raised Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter , Jacob R. Davis, Mechanical Engineering

Wind Turbine Power Production Estimation for Better Financial Agreements , Shanon Fan, Mechanical Engineering

Finite Element Analysis of Impact and Cohesion of Cold Sprayed Particles onto Non-Planar Surfaces , Zhongkui Liu, Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Design and Analysis: High-Precision Microcontact Printhead for Roll-to-Roll Printing of Flexible Electronics , Mehdi Riza, Mechanical Engineering

Jet Breakup Dynamics of Inkjet Printing Fluids , Kashyap Sundara Rajan, Mechanical Engineering

Ground Source Heat Pumps: Considerations for Large Facilities in Massachusetts , Eric Wagner, Mechanical Engineering

Theses from 2020 2020

Modeling of Electrical Grid Systems to Evaluate Sustainable Electricity Generation in Pakistan , Muhammad Mustafa Amjad, Mechanical Engineering

A Study on Latent Thermal Energy Storage (LTES) using Phase Change Materials (PCMs) 2020 , Ritvij Dixit, Mechanical Engineering

SunDown: Model-driven Per-Panel Solar Anomaly Detection for Residential Arrays , Menghong Feng, Mechanical Engineering

Nozzle Clogging Prevention and Analysis in Cold Spray , Alden Foelsche, Mechanical Engineering

Short Term Energy Forecasting for a Microgird Load using LSTM RNN , Akhil Soman, Mechanical Engineering

Optimization of Thermal Energy Storage Sizing Using Thermodynamic Analysis , Andrew Villanueva, Mechanical Engineering

Fabrication of Binder-Free Electrodes Based on Graphene Oxide with CNT for Decrease of Resistance , Di Zhang, Mechanical Engineering

Theses from 2019 2019

Computational Fluid Dynamics Models of Electromagnetic Levitation Experiments in Reduced Gravity , Gwendolyn Bracker, Mechanical Engineering

Forecasting the Cost of Electricity Generated by Offshore Wind Turbines , Timothy Costa, Mechanical Engineering

Optical-Fiber-Based Laser-Induced Cavitation for Dynamic Mechanical Characterization of Soft Materials , Qian Feng, Mechanical Engineering

On the Fuel Spray Applications of Multi-Phase Eulerian CFD Techniques , Gabriel Lev Jacobsohn, Mechanical Engineering

Topology Network Optimization of Facility Planning and Design Problems , Ravi Ratan Raj Monga, Mechanical Engineering

The Promise of VR Headsets: Validation of a Virtual Reality Headset-Based Driving Simulator for Measuring Drivers’ Hazard Anticipation Performance , Ganesh Pai Mangalore, Mechanical Engineering

Ammonia Production from a Non-Grid Connected Floating Offshore Wind-Farm: A System-Level Techno-Economic Review , Vismay V. Parmar, Mechanical Engineering

Calculation of Scalar Isosurface Area and Applications , Kedar Prashant Shete, Mechanical Engineering

Theses from 2018 2018

Electroplating of Copper on Tungsten Powder , Richard Berdos, Mechanical Engineering

A NUMERICAL FLUTTER PREDICTOR FOR 3D AIRFOILS USING THE ONERA DYNAMIC STALL MODEL , Pieter Boersma, Mechanical Engineering

Streamwise Flow-Induced Oscillations of Bluff Bodies - The Influence of Symmetry Breaking , Tyler Gurian, Mechanical Engineering

Thermal Radiation Measurement and Development of Tunable Plasmonic Thermal Emitter Using Strain-induced Buckling in Metallic Layers , Amir Kazemi-Moridani, Mechanical Engineering

Restructuring Controllers to Accommodate Plant Nonlinearities , Kushal Sahare, Mechanical Engineering

Application and Evaluation of Lighthouse Technology for Precision Motion Capture , Soumitra Sitole, Mechanical Engineering

High Strain Rate Dynamic Response of Aluminum 6061 Micro Particles at Elevated Temperatures and Varying Oxide Thicknesses of Substrate Surface , Carmine Taglienti, Mechanical Engineering

The Effects of Mechanical Loading and Tumor Factors on Osteocyte Dendrite Formation , Wenbo Wang, Mechanical Engineering

Microenvironment Regulates Fusion of Breast Cancer Cells , Peiran Zhu, Mechanical Engineering

Design for Sustainability through a Life Cycle Assessment Conceptual Framework Integrated within Product Lifecycle Management , Renpeng Zou, Mechanical Engineering

Theses from 2017 2017

Improving the Efficiency of Wind Farm Turbines using External Airfoils , Shujaut Bader, Mechanical Engineering

Evaluation Of Impedance Control On A Powered Hip Exoskeleton , Punith condoor, Mechanical Engineering

Experimental Study on Viscoelastic Fluid-Structure Interactions , Anita Anup Dey, Mechanical Engineering

BMI, Tumor Lesion and Probability of Femur Fracture: a Probabilistic Biomechanics Approach , Zhi Gao, Mechanical Engineering

A Magnetic Resonance Compatible Knee Extension Ergometer , Youssef Jaber, Mechanical Engineering

Non-Equispaced Fast Fourier Transforms in Turbulence Simulation , Aditya M. Kulkarni, Mechanical Engineering

INCORPORATING SEASONAL WIND RESOURCE AND ELECTRICITY PRICE DATA INTO WIND FARM MICROSITING , Timothy A. Pfeiffer, Mechanical Engineering

Effects of Malformed or Absent Valves to Lymphatic Fluid Transport and Lymphedema in Vivo in Mice , Akshay S. Pujari, Mechanical Engineering

Electroless Deposition & Electroplating of Nickel on Chromium-Nickel Carbide Powder , Jeffrey Rigali, Mechanical Engineering

Numerical Simulation of Multi-Phase Core-Shell Molten Metal Drop Oscillations , Kaushal Sumaria, Mechanical Engineering

Theses from 2016 2016

Cold Gas Dynamic Spray – Characterization of Polymeric Deposition , Trenton Bush, Mechanical Engineering

Intent Recognition Of Rotation Versus Translation Movements In Human-Robot Collaborative Manipulation Tasks , Vinh Q. Nguyen, Mechanical Engineering

A Soft Multiple-Degree of Freedom Load Cell Based on The Hall Effect , Qiandong Nie, Mechanical Engineering

A Haptic Surface Robot Interface for Large-Format Touchscreen Displays , Mark Price, Mechanical Engineering

Numerical Simulation of High Velocity Impact of a Single Polymer Particle during Cold Spray Deposition , Sagar P. Shah, Mechanical Engineering

Tunable Plasmonic Thermal Emitter Using Metal-Coated Elastomeric Structures , Robert Zando, Mechanical Engineering

Theses from 2015 2015

Thermodynamic Analysis of the Application of Thermal Energy Storage to a Combined Heat and Power Plant , Benjamin McDaniel, Mechanical Engineering

Towards a Semantic Knowledge Management Framework for Laminated Composites , Vivek Premkumar, Mechanical Engineering

A CONTINOUS ROTARY ACTUATION MECHANISM FOR A POWERED HIP EXOSKELETON , Matthew C. Ryder, Mechanical Engineering

Optimal Topological Arrangement of Queues in Closed Finite Queueing Networks , Lening Wang, Mechanical Engineering

Creating a New Model to Predict Cooling Tower Performance and Determining Energy Saving Opportunities through Economizer Operation , Pranav Yedatore Venkatesh, Mechanical Engineering

Theses from 2014 2014

New Generator Control Algorithms for Smart-Bladed Wind Turbines to Improve Power Capture in Below Rated Conditions , Bryce B. Aquino, Mechanical Engineering

UBOT-7: THE DESIGN OF A COMPLIANT DEXTEROUS MOBILE MANIPULATOR , Jonathan Cummings, Mechanical Engineering

Design and Control of a Two-Wheeled Robotic Walker , Airton R. da Silva Jr., Mechanical Engineering

Free Wake Potential Flow Vortex Wind Turbine Modeling: Advances in Parallel Processing and Integration of Ground Effects , Nathaniel B. Develder, Mechanical Engineering

Buckling of Particle-Laden Interfaces , Theo Dias Kassuga, Mechanical Engineering

Modeling Dynamic Stall for a Free Vortex Wake Model of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine , Evan M. Gaertner, Mechanical Engineering

An Experimental Study of the C-Start of a Mechanical Fish , Benjamin Kandaswamy Chinna Thambi, Mechanical Engineering

Measurement and Verification - Retro-Commissioning of a LEED Gold Rated Building Through Means of an Energy Model: Are Aggressive Energy Simulation Models Reliable? , Justin M. Marmaras, Mechanical Engineering

Development of a Support Structure for Multi-Rotor Wind Turbines , Gaurav Murlidhar Mate, Mechanical Engineering

Towards Accessible, Usable Knowledge Frameworks in Engineering , Jeffrey Mcpherson, Mechanical Engineering

A Consistent Algorithm for Implementing the Space Conservation Law , Venkata Pavan Pillalamarri Narasimha Rao, Mechanical Engineering

Kinetics of Aluminization and Homogenization in Wrought H-X750 Nickel-Base Superalloy , Sean Reilly, Mechanical Engineering

Single-Phase Turbulent Enthalpy Transport , Bradley J. Shields, Mechanical Engineering

CFD Simulation of the Flow around NREL Phase VI Wind Turbine , Yang Song, Mechanical Engineering

Selection of Outputs for Distributed Parameter Systems by Identifiability Analysis in the Time-scale Domain , Teergele, Mechanical Engineering

The Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbine Towers Using Passive Tuned Mass Dampers , Onur Can Yilmaz, Mechanical Engineering

Design of a Passive Exoskeleton Spine , Haohan Zhang, Mechanical Engineering

TURBULENT TRANSITION IN ELECTROMAGNETICALLY LEVITATED LIQUID METAL DROPLETS , Jie Zhao, Mechanical Engineering

Theses from 2013 2013

Optimization of Mixing in a Simulated Biomass Bed Reactor with a Center Feeding Tube , Michael T. Blatnik, Mechanical Engineering

Continued Development of a Chilled Water System Analysis Tool for Energy Conservation Measures Evaluation , Ghanshyam Gaudani, Mechanical Engineering

Application of Finite Element Method in Protein Normal Mode Analysis , Chiung-fang Hsu, Mechanical Engineering

Asymmetric Blade Spar for Passive Aerodynamic Load Control , Charles Mcclelland, Mechanical Engineering

Background and Available Potential Energy in Numerical Simulations of a Boussinesq Fluid , Shreyas S. Panse, Mechanical Engineering

Techno-Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Systems Used as an Electricity Storage Technology in a Wind Farm with Large Amounts of Intermittent Energy , Yash Sanghai, Mechanical Engineering

Multi Rotor Wind Turbine Design And Cost Scaling , Preeti Verma, Mechanical Engineering

Activity Intent Recognition of the Torso Based on Surface Electromyography and Inertial Measurement Units , Zhe Zhang, Mechanical Engineering

Theses from 2012 2012

Simulations of Non-Contact Creep in Regimes of Mixed Dominance , Maija Benitz, Mechanical Engineering

Techniques for Industrial Implementation of Emerging Semantic Technologies , Jay T. Breindel, Mechanical Engineering

Environmental Impacts Due to Fixed and Floating Offshore Wind Turbines , Micah K. Brewer, Mechanical Engineering

Physical Model of the Feeding Strike of the Mantis Shrimp , Suzanne M. Cox, Mechanical Engineering

Investigating the Relationship Between Material Property Axes and Strain Orientations in Cebus Apella Crania , Christine M. Dzialo, Mechanical Engineering

A Multi-Level Hierarchical Finite Element Model for Capillary Failure in Soft Tissue , Lu Huang, Mechanical Engineering

Finite Element Analysis of a Femur to Deconstruct the Design Paradox of Bone Curvature , Sameer Jade, Mechanical Engineering

Vortex-Induced Vibrations of an Inclined Cylinder in Flow , Anil B. Jain, Mechanical Engineering

Experimental Study of Stability Limits for Slender Wind Turbine Blades , Shruti Ladge, Mechanical Engineering

Semi-Active Damping for an Intelligent Adaptive Ankle Prosthesis , Andrew K. Lapre, Mechanical Engineering

A Finite Volume Approach For Cure Kinetics Simulation , Wei Ma, Mechanical Engineering

Effect of Slip on Flow Past Superhydrophobic Cylinders , Pranesh Muralidhar, Mechanical Engineering

High Speed Flow Simulation in Fuel Injector Nozzles , Sukanta Rakshit, Mechanical Engineering

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  5. Full Meaning of GSP #textile #thesis #msc

  6. Copy of MSc Thesis Defence Live streaming

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  1. How to Write a Dissertation or Masters Thesis

    1. Understand your dissertation (or thesis) topic There are slight differences between theses and dissertations, although both require a high standard of writing skill and knowledge in your topic. They are also formatted very similarly.

  2. PDF Format Guidelines for The Preparation of Master Thesis

    3 D. Thesis Sections 1. Title Page The title of the thesis as it appears on the Title Page MUST BE IDENTICAL to the title found on the Approval Page and on the Thesis of Final Oral Examination including the capitalization and punctuation. All items on the Title Page must follow the model exactly (see Example II).

  3. Prize-Winning Thesis and Dissertation Examples

    Published on September 9, 2022 by Tegan George . Revised on July 18, 2023. It can be difficult to know where to start when writing your thesis or dissertation. One way to come up with some ideas or maybe even combat writer's block is to check out previous work done by other students on a similar thesis or dissertation topic to yours.

  4. A complete guide to writing a master's thesis

    There are two ways that you can approach the editing of your master's thesis. Both have value and it depends on how you view the process of writing. These are: Individually edit sections as they are returned from the supervisor. Edit at the very end, so that the editing can be consistent across sections.

  5. PDF Guide to Writing MSc Dissertations

    The MSc project is a worth a quarter of your MSc degree, as much as two half-unit courses, and takes at least as much time. You should get started on the dissertation in Lent Term. Consult the "Instructions and Guidelines for the Dissertation in Applicable Mathematics" for the official timetable of the dissertation project.

  6. How to Write a Master's Thesis (with Pictures)

    1 Think about the objectives of writing a thesis. You will spend a lot of time working on this project, so it is imperative that you choose wisely. Typical objectives are (ordered from the most common and important to less common): To get a degree - topic should be difficult enough, but manageable too.

  7. PDF Guide for Preparation and Evaluation of Higher Degree Research Thesis

    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), thesis is a requirement for the award of masters (MPhil, MSc, MA, LLM, MBA, MPA, MPH, M.Arch, MFA, etc) and Doctoral degrees. This Guide provides the graduate research student with most of the information needed to organise the thesis to

  8. Dissertation & Thesis Outline

    A thesis or dissertation outline is one of the most critical early steps in your writing process. It helps you to lay out and organize your ideas and can provide you with a roadmap for deciding the specifics of your dissertation topic and showcasing its relevance to your field.

  9. How to Write a M.Sc. Thesis

    The thesis explains a novel exploratory implementation or a novel empirical study whose results will be of interest to the Computer Science community in general and to a portion of the Computer Science community in particular, e.g., Artificial Intelligence, Computational Complexity, etc.

  10. How to Write a Dissertation or Thesis Proposal

    Revised on July 18, 2023. When starting your thesis or dissertation process, one of the first requirements is a research proposal or a prospectus. It describes what or who you want to examine, delving into why, when, where, and how you will do so, stemming from your research question and a relevant topic.

  11. What Is A Master's Thesis?

    Your thesis is the sum of all of your learned knowledge from your master's program and gives you a chance to prove your capabilities in your chosen field. A thesis also involves a significant amount of research, and depending on the subject, may require you to conduct interviews, surveys and gather primary and secondary resources.

  12. PDF MSc Research Project/Dissertation Guidelines

    MSc Research Project/Dissertation Guidelines 1 Your dissertation should conform to the guidelines set out below. Please read through these carefully before writing your dissertation. Early in the preparation of the dissertation you should consult your supervisor, as their advice will be invaluable in ensuring the best way of presenting your data.

  13. Completing your Masters degree

    Submission of Intent to initiate a Masters defence. Step 3. Submit. Please note that your degree requirements are considered complete when one electronic copy of the thesis, revised as directed by your defence examining committee, is submitted to the School of Graduate Studies through the E-Thesis Submission module in MacSphere.

  14. PDF MSc Project & Dissertation Guidelines

    MSc Dissertation - Format and Length. As a general rule, the body of the dissertation should be between 15,000-20,000 words - this will normally correspond to about 45-60 pages if you include some diagrams. Dissertations which are significantly outside this range may be penalised for being too short or too long.

  15. Student's Guide For Final Year Project Thesis: BSc, MSc, MA, and MBA

    Student's Guide For Final Year Project Thesis: BSc, MSc, MA, and MBA Editor: Koba Lomidze Authors: Fadi Safieddine University of East London Abstract

  16. PDF A PROPOSAL FOR A MASTER'S THESIS

    A Thesis Proposal is a document that sets forth what is to be studied as a thesis project, why and in what way. It contains a number of important sections. The purpose of the proposal is to communicate the plan for the work to the faculty of the Division of Emerging Media Studies via the First Reader (principal thesis advisor) and a Second Reader.

  17. BSc and MSc Thesis Subjects of the Bioinformatics Group

    MSc thesis: In the Bioinformatics group, we offer a wide range of MSc thesis projects, from applied bioinformatics to computational method development. Here is a list of available MSc thesis projects.Besides the fact that these topics can be pursued for a MSc thesis, they can also be pursued as part of a Research Practice.. BSc thesis: As a BSc student you will work as an apprentice alongside ...

  18. PDF Guidelines to Master's Project Proposal

    for your MSc Thesis in myStudies . Outline of the Master's Project Proposal . The list below is a recommended guideline (except for time plan. 3) for your Master's Project Proposal. Title . Define a short, significant title which reflects clearly the contents of your report. The title page follows the

  19. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Placement of the thesis statement. Step 1: Start with a question. Step 2: Write your initial answer. Step 3: Develop your answer. Step 4: Refine your thesis statement. Types of thesis statements. Other interesting articles. Frequently asked questions about thesis statements.

  20. (PDF) MSc Dissertation in Electrical Power Engineering ...

    This thesis is produced under MSc Electrical Power Engineering Dissertation module covering the works for Real-Time simulation of a DC microgrid system. Conventionally, centralised generation...

  21. Master Thesis Templates

    And now you can create an A-worthy thesis in half the time with Beautiful.ai's master thesis template. Our customizable template has all the basics to help you sum up your comprehensive knowledge on the course and prove your skills in the field. Slides like literature review, research methodology, and a strong thesis conclusion will help you ...

  22. Mechanical Engineering Masters Theses Collection

    Theses from 2023 PDF. Device Design for Inducing Aneurysm-Susceptible Flow Conditions Onto Endothelial Cells, hans f. foelsche, Mechanical Engineering. PDF. Thermal Conductivity and Mechanical Properties of Interlayer-Bonded Graphene Bilayers, Afnan Mostafa, Mechanical Engineering. PDF

  23. Theses & Dissertations

    2017. Sachi Jayasuriya, "Modeling and Analysis of Information-Embedded Power Electronic Converter Systems" Ph.D. Thesis, May 2017. Edwin J. John, "Experimental Testbed for Load Control on an AC/DC Microgrid" M.S. Thesis, September 2017. 2016. Jonathan Berardino, "Modeling and Analysis of Commercial Building Electrical Loads for Demand Side Management," Ph.D. Thesis, December 2016.