domestic violence essay upsc

Call us @ 08069405205

domestic violence essay upsc

Search Here

domestic violence essay upsc

  • An Introduction to the CSE Exam
  • Personality Test
  • Annual Calendar by UPSC-2024
  • Common Myths about the Exam
  • About Insights IAS
  • Our Mission, Vision & Values
  • Director's Desk
  • Meet Our Team
  • Our Branches
  • Careers at Insights IAS
  • Daily Current Affairs+PIB Summary
  • Insights into Editorials
  • Insta Revision Modules for Prelims
  • Current Affairs Quiz
  • Static Quiz
  • Current Affairs RTM
  • Insta-DART(CSAT)
  • Insta 75 Days Revision Tests for Prelims 2023
  • Secure (Mains Answer writing)
  • Secure Synopsis
  • Ethics Case Studies
  • Insta Ethics
  • Weekly Essay Challenge
  • Insta Revision Modules-Mains
  • Insta 75 Days Revision Tests for Mains
  • Secure (Archive)
  • Anthropology
  • Law Optional
  • Kannada Literature
  • Public Administration
  • English Literature
  • Medical Science
  • Mathematics
  • Commerce & Accountancy
  • Monthly Magazine: CURRENT AFFAIRS 30
  • Content for Mains Enrichment (CME)
  • InstaMaps: Important Places in News
  • Weekly CA Magazine
  • The PRIME Magazine
  • Insta Revision Modules-Prelims
  • Insta-DART(CSAT) Quiz
  • Insta 75 days Revision Tests for Prelims 2022
  • Insights SECURE(Mains Answer Writing)
  • Interview Transcripts
  • Previous Years' Question Papers-Prelims
  • Answer Keys for Prelims PYQs
  • Solve Prelims PYQs
  • Previous Years' Question Papers-Mains
  • UPSC CSE Syllabus
  • Toppers from Insights IAS
  • Testimonials
  • Felicitation
  • UPSC Results
  • Indian Heritage & Culture
  • Ancient Indian History
  • Medieval Indian History
  • Modern Indian History
  • World History
  • World Geography
  • Indian Geography
  • Indian Society
  • Social Justice
  • International Relations
  • Agriculture
  • Environment & Ecology
  • Disaster Management
  • Science & Technology
  • Security Issues
  • Ethics, Integrity and Aptitude

InstaCourses

  • Indian Heritage & Culture
  • Enivornment & Ecology

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

SANSAD TV: 75 YEARS: LAWS THAT SHAPED INDIA- THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN FROM DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ACT, 2005

sansad_tv

A major breakthrough in women’s rights in India, The Protection of Women from Domestic Violence, 2005 was enacted by the Parliament to provide protection to women against violence from family.

Domestic violence:

  • Causing hurt, injury or danger to life, limb, health, safety or well-being, whether mental or physical.
  • Causing harm, injury, or danger to the woman with an intention to coerce her or any other person related to her to meet any demand for dowry.
  • “Physical abuse” includes hurt of any kind. Assault, criminal intimidation and criminal force.
  • “Sexual abuse” such as conduct of a sexual nature such as forced sexual intercourse, forcing the aggrieved person to watch pornography or other obscene material. Forcibly using woman to entertain others, any other act of sexual nature, abusing, humiliating, degrading or otherwise violative of one’s dignity.
  • “Verbal and emotional abuse” such as Accusation/aspersion on character or conduct. Insult for not brining dowry, Insult for not having a male child. etc. Forcing to not attend school, college or any other educational institution preventing one from taking up a job repeated threats to cause pain to any person in whom the woman is interested. Preventing from marrying a person of your choice.
  • “Economic abuse” such as not providing money for maintaining woman or her children Not providing food, clothes, medicine. etc, Forcing woman out of the house. Preventing from accessing or using any part of the house, preventing or obstructing one from carrying on employment Non-payment of rent in case of a rented accommodation, selling or pawing stridhan or any other valuables without informing and without consent. Forcibly taking away salary, income or wages etc. Non-payment of other bills such as electricity, etc.

Who is covered under the Act?

  • The Act covers all women who may be mother, sister, wife, widow or partners living in a shared household. The relationship may be in nature of marriage or adoption. In addition relationships with family members living together as a joint family are also included. However, no female relative of the husband or the male partner can file a complaint against the wife or the female partner, for e.g. the mother-in-law cannot file an application against a daughter-in-law, but she can file an application against her daughter-in-law for abetting her son to commit violence against her.

Important observations made by the Court:

  • Alongside, the Court termed the 2005 law on protection of women from domestic violence as a “milestone”
  • Despite the 2005 law, offences against women is “rampant” in this country and they face “violence in some form or the other on almost every day”.
  • A woman resigns her fate to the never ending cycle of enduring violence and discrimination as a daughter, a sister, a wife, a mother, a partner or a single woman in her lifetime.
  • Non-retaliation by women against violence, coupled with the absence of laws addressing women’s issues, ignorance of the existing laws enacted for them and societal attitude makes them vulnerable.

Who can file a complaint?

  • Any woman who alleges to have been subjected to any act of domestic violence by the offender or any person may file a complaint on her behalf
  • A child is also entitled to relief under the Domestic Violence Act. The mother of such a child can make an application on behalf of her minor child (whether male or female). In cases where the mother makes an application to the court for herself, the children can also be added as co-applicants.

Against whom can a complaint be filed?

  • Any adult male member who has been in a domestic relationship with the woman
  • Relatives of the husband or the male partner
  • Includes both male and female relatives of the male partner

To whom can information be given or complaint be made?

  • Information may be given arid complaint can be made to a police officer/Protection Officer/Service provider (an NGO) or Magistrate.

What is a domestic relationship?

  • Relationship between two persons who live or have at any point of time lived together in a shared household
  • Includes relationship of consanguinity, marriage, relationship in the nature of marriage.
  • Shared household is a household where the woman lives or has lived with the man in a domestic relationship. She may not be living in the shared household at the time of the application for relief but such women are entitled to relief under the Domestic Violence Act as long as the domestic relationship subsists.
  • Every woman in a domestic relationship has the right to reside in the shared household, even if she does not have any right, title or interest in it.

Provision for shelter home and Medical Aid

An aggrieved person or on her behalf a Protection Officer or service provider can request to a person in charge of a shelter home or a medical facility to provide shelter or medical aid to her.

Who may file an application to the magistrate?

  • An aggrieved person or
  • A Protection Officer or
  • Any other person on behalf of the aggrieved person may present an application to the magistrate
  • It is the duty of the protection officer and the service provider to provide all assistance to the woman who is a victim of domestic violence.

Left Menu Icon

  • Our Mission, Vision & Values
  • Director’s Desk
  • Commerce & Accountancy
  • Previous Years’ Question Papers-Prelims
  • Previous Years’ Question Papers-Mains
  • Environment & Ecology
  • Science & Technology

TriumphIAS

Violence Against Women in India UPSC: Causes, Forms, and Solutions | Sociology Optional for UPSC Civil Services Examination | Triumph IAS

Violence against women in india, (relevant for sociology optional for civil services examination).

Paper 2: Unit-13: Soical Changes in India; Challenges of Soical Transformation 

Table of Contents Toggle Violence Against Women in India (Relevant for Sociology Optional for Civil Services Examination) Violence Against Women in India Various Forms of Violence Against Women in India Life cycle of women and associated violence:         Factors associated with Violence Against Women in India CONSEQUENCES OF VIOELNCE AGAINST WOMEN Brahmanical Patriarchy  Suggestions to control Violence Against Women in India Frequently Asked Questions: Related Blogs … Why Vikash Ranjan’s Classes for Sociology? Choose The Best Sociology Optional Teacher for IAS Preparation? Find More Blogs…

  • Violence Against Women in India is a form of gender-based violence that inflicts physical, sexual, psychological, social, cultural, and economic harm on women within society . This includes acts of violence, threats of such acts, as well as coercive or arbitrary denial of women’s freedom and liberty. Such violence occurs in both the public sphere and the private sphere of the family, and it is a deeply entrenched concept encompassing a wide range of abuses.
  • It is associated with ‘force’ whether overt or covert used to wrest from a woman something that she does not want to give of her own free will, which causes her either physical injury or emotional trauma or both.
  • According to Schuler , gender violence is defined as “ any act involving use of force or coercion with intent of perpetuating and promoting hierarchical gender relations.”
  • Liz Kelly has defined Violence Against Women in India as “any physical, visual, verbal or sexual act that is experienced by the woman or girl at the time or later as a threat, invasion or assault, that has the effect of hurting or disregarding or removing the ability to control one’s own behaviour or an interaction, whether this be within the workplace, the home, on the streets or in any other area of the community”.
  • Violence affects the lives of millions of women worldwide, in all socio-economic and educational classes. It cuts across cultural and religious barriers, impeding the right of women to participate fully in society. Violence Against Women in India varies from domestic abuse, female feticide, dowry death and rape to child marriages and female circumcision. All are violations of the most fundamental human rights.

Various Forms of Violence Against Women in India

Violence Against Women in India is multifaceted, encompassing various levels of harm, including:

  • Psychological Violence : This form of violence targets a woman’s mental and emotional well-being. It involves tactics such as yelling, insults, mockery, threats, abusive language, humiliation, harassment, contempt, and deliberate emotional neglect or isolation.
  • Physical Violence : The most visible and direct form of violence ranges from physical acts like pushing, shoving, hitting, beating, using weapons, torture, mutilation, and even murder.
  • Sexual Violence : Sexual violence includes any non-consensual sexual activity forced upon a person. It covers a spectrum from harassment and unwanted sexual touching to rape, and may also encompass incest.
  • Financial Violence : This form of violence involves various tactics aimed at gaining control over a woman’s finances, inheritance, or employment income. It can include preventing a partner from working outside the home or engaging in activities that promote financial independence.
  • Spiritual Abuse : Spiritual abuse seeks to destroy an individual’s cultural or religious beliefs through ridicule or punishment. It can involve forbidding the practice of one’s personal religion or forcing women and children to adhere to religious practices that are not their own.
  • Intimidation : Intimidation as a form of violence includes making women fearful through looks, actions, gestures, property destruction, or displaying weapons.
  • Isolation : Isolation is used as a means of control, limiting a woman’s social interactions, restricting where she goes, and whom she sees.
  • Using Privilege : This form of violence involves using one’s privilege to exert control. Abusers may treat women or children as servants and insist on having the final say in all matters, rigidly adhering to traditional gender roles.

It’s important to note that Violence Against Women in India can manifest in subtle ways, not just through overt acts of physical harm. Contemptuous gestures, lewd remarks, obscene gestures, whistling, or leering can also leave lasting emotional scars. These forms of violence often overlap and are not mutually exclusive. Furthermore, Violence Against Women in India can take the form of deprivation, neglect, or discrimination, not solely relying on physical aggression. For example, intimate partner violence may involve sexual abuse, isolation, neglect, and psychological manipulation in addition to physical harm.

Life cycle of women and associated violence:        

Factors associated with violence against women in india.

  • Patriarchal structures: The Violence Against Women in India is usually a manifestation of unequal power relations between men and women due to patriarchal structures present in society.
  • Socialization : the socialization of male and female kids based on norms conforming to patriarchy.  Patriarchal norms perpetuate an environment where Violence Against Women in India is tolerated and normalized. Societal expectations of women’s submissiveness contribute to their vulnerability . Nishi Mitra has studied domestic violence in India. She has found that socialization that leads to the powerlessness of women can ultimately result in violence against them.
  • Cultural Beliefs and Practices: VEENA DAS says that the cultural enslavement of women is responsible for Violence Against Women in India. Deep-rooted cultural beliefs that reinforce women’s inferiority contribute to violence. Practices such as child marriage, dowry, and honour killings uphold oppressive gender roles.
  • Caste and gender intersectionality :
  • Kalpana Kannaviran believes that the single most important arena for the gendering of caste occurs in the arena of sexuality. The desire to regulate female sexuality has led to a considerable ritual preoccupation with female purity in the caste societies of Sri Lanka and India. Predictably, male sexuality is not ritualised in the same way.
  • The commodification of women in the marriage market in patriarchal, patrilined caste society goes hand in hand with prescriptions for women’s behaviour and restrictions on their mobility, the dispossession of women in property and inheritance matters, and their absence in local level political and decision making bodies. The entire complex constituting the construction of gender in caste society is a construction that radically devalues the status of women in these societies.
  • Economic Inequality: Socioeconomic disparities limit women’s access to resources and opportunities, making them more susceptible to various forms of violence, including economic exploitation and domestic abuse. Lack of excess to entitlements make women underclass and marginalised devoid of social, economic, cultural capital.
  • Socio Political Factors: women have very low representation in different spheres of politics. Even if they are represented in local self-government, women are not effective decision makers. Structures like Panch Pati arise to reinforce patriarchy. Similarly discriminatory orientation at the level of political parties is also clearly visible.
  • Weak Legal and Judicial Mechanisms: Inadequate enforcement of laws and limited access to justice fail to provide adequate protection and redress for victims of violence, emboldening perpetrators. Uma Chakarvoty says despite liberal legislations conditions of women remains unimproved because culture and patriarchal norms dominates statutory norms in day to day life. Madhu Kishwar and Ruth Vanita pose the women’s question by highlighting the incompatibility of Indian constitution law, violence, aggression and crimes against women .
  • Lack of Awareness and Education: Insufficient education and information hinder women’s ability to challenge oppressive norms. Women mostly end up in informal sector for employment, making them vulnerable to violence.
  • Absence of social justice: Ambedkar says absence of social justice highlights how caste-based discrimination and unequal power structures intersect with gender-based violence, exacerbating the vulnerability of Dalit women .
  • Environmental degradation: Vandana Shiva connects Violence Against Women in India to environmental degradation, emphasizing the link between patriarchy, resource exploitation, and gender-based violence.
  • Development induced displacement: Utsa Patnaik highlights how development induced displacement and rehabilitation plans have put tribal women in condition of sexual violence by contractors, hampering their cultural socialization.
  • Media and Popular Culture: Media often perpetuates harmful stereotypes and objectification of women, normalizing violence and contributing to a culture of victim-blaming. Kilbourne says media presents mannequin image of women. Therefore media creates anxiety among women about their bodies. It causes emotional abuse of women.

CONSEQUENCES OF VIOELNCE AGAINST WOMEN

  • Public Health Impact : Violence Against Women in India takes a toll on both physical and mental health, affecting their overall well-being. This includes a range of health issues, from physical injuries to mental health conditions like depression, suicidal ideation, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Additionally, it can lead to sexual dysfunctions . Access to healthcare and reproductive services may also become challenging for survivors.
  • Economic Ramifications : The economic consequences of Violence Against Women in India are significant. It leads to decreased productivity and efficiency as women may be unable to work due to physical injuries or emotional distress. Consequently, this hampers their participation in the workforce and financial independence.
  • Development Hindrance : Violence Against Women in India acts as a barrier to development and poverty alleviation. It impedes the equitable distribution of resources and opportunities, hindering women’s full participation in education and employment. Furthermore, it places a strain on law enforcement and judicial systems, resulting in substantial direct costs.
  • Social Implications : Violence Against Women in India restricts women’s involvement in the public sphere, which is crucial for personal and societal growth. It curtails their ability to make decisions related to family planning and childbearing . Discrimination and violence against marginalized groups, such as Dalit women, compound existing social inequalities.

  Suggestions to control Violence Against Women in India

  • Gender neutral socialization should be focus of society. Gender-neutral socialization is an approach that challenges traditional gender norms and roles and promotes gender equality. By avoiding gender stereotypes, creating a more inclusive society, challenging gender norms, and promoting gender equality, gender-neutral socialization can help prevent gender-based violence and discrimination.
  • Judith Butler’s work on gender performativity underscores the socially constructed nature of gender. By challenging and deconstructing traditional gender roles, societies can work towards creating a more inclusive and equal environment , reducing violence rooted in gender norms.
  • Equal entitlement to men and women in family and society . Patriarchal entitlement creates discriminatory structures which not only perpetuates the hegemonic masculinity and violence but also prevent consciousness in women against exploitation and it becomes acceptable too. Implement policies that ensure equal pay for equal work and support work-life balance.
  • Capacity building of women and economic empowerment by creating equal opportunities for women.
  • Ranjana Kumari emphasizes the need for legal and policy reforms to combat Violence Against Women in India. She advocates for stronger legislation, improved enforcement, and better access to justice for survivors of gender-based violence.
  • Equal representation of women in various spheres of politics, effective participation in decision making process be that in bureaucracy, legislature or corporate.
  • Proper rehabilitation of women has been victims of violence. Along with it sensitization of concerned authorities is needed.
  • Establishment of cheaper and less formal courts–courts to handle only female cases. The scope of existing family courts should be enlarged to include all types of domestic and non-domestic problems of women. Judges, magistrates and lawyers with knowledge and interests in female matters should be appointed.
  • Strengthening and increasing voluntary organisation which could take up individual women’s problems with their in-laws, police, or the courts or the concerned individuals. Voice of an individual woman has less effect. Voices of women organised for a cause are more effective.
  • Collect data on the prevalence of gender-based violence and its intersections with other forms of discrimination. Use research findings to inform policy and program development’
  • Bell Hooks stresses the importance of challenging traditional notions of masculinity and femininity through education and media. She advocates for critical engagement with media representations to counter harmful stereotypes and promote healthy relationship.
  • Recognize and address the unique challenges faced by marginalized groups, such as Dalit women, in the context of gender-based violence. Ensure their representation in decision-making processes.

From challenging patriarchal structures to promoting gender-neutral socialization, enforcing laws, and ensuring equal representation, the path forward is illuminated. By embracing these insights and working collectively, we can create a society where women are empowered, protected, and free from violence. It’s a journey toward a more equitable and just world that demands our unwavering commitment and action.

Frequently Asked Questions:

  • Question: Define Violence Against Women in India and explain how it manifests in different forms.

Answer: Violence Against Women in India encompasses physical, psychological, and economic harm inflicted on women, including acts of force, coercion, and threats.

2. Question: Discuss the concept of Brahmanical patriarchy and its role in perpetuating gender-based violence in Indian society.

Answer: Brahmanical patriarchy is a social structure rooted in caste and gender hierarchies, idealizing female purity and enforcing economic dependence.

3. Question: What are the consequences of Violence Against Women in India on public health and economic development?

Answer: Violence Against Women in India leads to physical and mental health issues, decreased economic productivity, and hinders overall development.

4. Question: How can gender-neutral socialization contribute to preventing gender-based violence?

Answer: Gender-neutral socialization challenges traditional gender norms, promoting equality and reducing violence rooted in gender norms.

5. Question: Discuss the importance of equal representation of women in politics and decision-making processes in addressing gender-based violence.

Answer: Equal representation ensures women’s voices are heard and policies are enacted to combat violence.

6. Question: Explain the significance of collecting data on the prevalence of gender-based violence and its intersections with other forms of discrimination.

Answer: Data informs policy development and program implementation to address gender-based violence effectively.

7. Question: How can media and education play a role in challenging harmful gender stereotypes and promoting healthy relationships?

Answer: Media and education can counter stereotypes and encourage critical engagement with representations.

8. Question: Describe the role of voluntary organizations in addressing Violence Against Women in India and advocating for individual women’s rights.

Answer: Voluntary organizations provide support and amplify women’s voices for a collective impact.

9. Question: What steps can be taken to ensure proper rehabilitation and sensitization of authorities for victims of gender-based violence?

Answer: Rehabilitation programs and training for authorities are essential for effective support.

10. Question: How does Violence Against Women in India intersect with caste-based discrimination, and what measures can address this issue?

Answer: Caste-based discrimination exacerbates the vulnerability of Dalit women, requiring targeted interventions and representation.

Reference: Static Part 

Related Blogs …

Symbolic Interactionism Sociology, Symbolic interaction, meaningful symbols, social interaction, human behavior, language, dramaturgical analysis, labeling approach, sociological theories, critical analysis.

To master these intricacies and fare well in the Sociology Optional Syllabus, aspiring sociologists might benefit from guidance by the Best Sociology Optional Teacher and participation in the Best Sociology Optional Coaching. These avenues provide comprehensive assistance, ensuring a solid understanding of sociology’s diverse methodologies and techniques.

Violence Against Women in India, Violence Against Women UPSC, Violence Against Women in society, Violence Against Women, gender-based violence, Brahmanical patriarchy, psychological violence, physical violence, economic violence, cultural beliefs, socialization, societal impact, solutions, gender equality, empowerment, Violence Against Women in Indian society, Violence Against Women

Why Vikash Ranjan’s Classes for Sociology?

Proper guidance and assistance are required to learn the skill of interlinking current happenings with the conventional topics. VIKASH RANJAN SIR at TRIUMPH IAS guides students according to the Recent Trends of UPSC, making him the Best Sociology Teacher for Sociology Optional UPSC.

At Triumph IAS, the Best Sociology Optional Coaching platform, we not only provide the best study material and applied classes for Sociology for IAS but also conduct regular assignments and class tests to assess candidates’ writing skills and understanding of the subject.

Choose T he Best Sociology Optional Teacher for IAS Preparation?

At the beginning of the journey for Civil Services Examination preparation, many students face a pivotal decision – selecting their optional subject. Questions such as “ which optional subject is the best? ” and “ which optional subject is the most scoring? ” frequently come to mind. Choosing the right optional subject, like choosing the best sociology optional teacher , is a subjective yet vital step that requires a thoughtful decision based on facts. A misstep in this crucial decision can indeed prove disastrous.

Ever since the exam pattern was revamped in 2013, the UPSC has eliminated the need for a second optional subject. Now, candidates have to choose only one optional subject for the UPSC Mains , which has two papers of 250 marks each. One of the compelling choices for many has been the sociology optional. However, it’s strongly advised to decide on your optional subject for mains well ahead of time to get sufficient time to complete the syllabus. After all, most students score similarly in General Studies Papers; it’s the score in the optional subject & essay that contributes significantly to the final selection.

“ A sound strategy does not rely solely on the popular Opinion of toppers or famous YouTubers cum teachers. ”

It requires understanding one’s ability, interest, and the relevance of the subject, not just for the exam but also for life in general. Hence, when selecting the best sociology teacher, one must consider the usefulness of sociology optional coaching in General Studies, Essay, and Personality Test.

The choice of the optional subject should be based on objective criteria, such as the nature, scope, and size of the syllabus, uniformity and stability in the question pattern, relevance of the syllabic content in daily life in society, and the availability of study material and guidance. For example, choosing the best sociology optional coaching can ensure access to top-quality study materials and experienced teachers. Always remember, the approach of the UPSC optional subject differs from your academic studies of subjects. Therefore, before settling for sociology optional , you need to analyze the syllabus, previous years’ pattern, subject requirements (be it ideal, visionary, numerical, conceptual theoretical), and your comfort level with the subject.

This decision marks a critical point in your UPSC – CSE journey , potentially determining your success in a career in IAS/Civil Services. Therefore, it’s crucial to choose wisely, whether it’s the optional subject or the best sociology optional teacher . Always base your decision on accurate facts, and never let your emotional biases guide your choices. After all, the search for the best sociology optional coaching is about finding the perfect fit for your unique academic needs and aspirations.

Follow us :

🔎 https://www.instagram.com/triumphias

🔎 www.triumphias.com

🔎https://www.youtube.com/c/TriumphIAS

https://t.me/VikashRanjanSociology

Find More Blogs…

Leave a reply cancel reply.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

upsc-online-classes

Domestic violence, how can we control it?

Essay Contest for UPSC Exam for IAS

Introduction:

Bride beheaded for dowry", "School going child dies due to injuries after being beaten up by father", "A seventy-year-old man was killed in a property dispute", "Men in Chandigarh Harassment of… ”.All this and nothing, randomly turn to any newspaper and you will get news of such violence all over the country. All these are what we come to know through various forms of media. There are more such cases which go on without a license every day. In fact, include cases that we do ourselves or that we see in the neighborhood, but hesitate to take a single step to reduce their incidence.

Effect of domestic violence in society:

Domestic violence is present in almost every society in the world. The term can be classified on various grounds. Violence against spouse, children or the elderly is just a few of the most commonly encountered cases. There are different types of tactics adopted by the attacker against the victim. Physical abuse, emotional abuse, psychological abuse or deprivation, economic deprivation / exploitation etc., are the most common types of abuses faced by victims.

Domestic violence is not only a problem of developing or developed countries. It is also very prevalent in developed countries. Domestic violence is a reflection of our pseudo-civilized society. Violence has no place in a civilized world. But the number of cases that occur each year raise a high alarm. And this is not the whole picture, as; Most cases go unregistered or unnoticed in everyday life. This is a very dangerous trend in our society and it has to be dealt with by iron hands.

Violence is breaking out in our society. It is present almost everywhere and somewhere this explosion is just behind the doors of our houses. Behind closed doors of homes across our country, people are being tortured, beaten and killed. It is also happening in rural areas, towns, cities and metros. It is crossing all social classes, gender, racial lines and age groups. It is becoming a legacy from one generation to another.

Major causes of domestic violence:

Patriarchy is more important in upbringing, so girl is considered weak and boy is courageous. Girl freedom is crushed in the early stages of life. Major causes of domestic violence are considered as

1. Lack of egalitarian education system.

2. To doubt the character of a woman.

3. Alcohol Addiction.

4. Impact of electronic media.

5. Preventing women from becoming self-supporting.

Domestic violence has physical, mental and emotional effects on women and children. This has an impact on women's work and decision making ability. The direct impact of this violence can also be seen in the family on mutual relations and on neighbors and children. Domestic violence, death, and suicide have increased due to domestic violence. The trend of prostitution has also increased for the same reason. Public participation of women is hindered. The work capacity of women decreases, and at the same time it is also scared. As a result, the harassed woman becomes a mental patient who sometimes reaches the point of insanity. Second class status is established in the victim's home.

Steps to control domestic violence:

Physical, financial, mental abuse and sexual violence with women in the family comes under the purview of domestic violence. Doing so is a punishable offense under the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, 2005. Any wife, daughter, mother or female friend living without marriage can pray to the court to get an order of protection as per this law.

Main provisions of the Act If a woman is a victim of domestic violence - Get information from the Protection Officer about the assistance and relief under the Act; One can apply to the Magistrate for the following assistance -

A. Order for Protection (Section-18)

B. Order to reside in common house (Section-19)

C. Financial Assistance (Section-20)

D. Order of custody (Section-21)

E. Compensation / compensation order (Section-22)

Domestic violence complaints will be known as "domestic violence incident reports"; Assistance may be sought from the police or conservation officer to guard against any danger; The court may prevent the accused / accused from selling the house where the woman also resides; Accusers can also be prevented from going to or near the house where the woman is staying; Protection can be given to the victim's children; The victim woman has the right to take female money, jewelery, clothing and daily use items.

Conclusion:

One in ten American women will be raped by an intimate partner in their lifetime, and intimate partners, usually men, are responsible for one-third of all murders of women. Most research on domestic violence focuses on victims, but what about the abusers? New studies have exposed why abusers behave as they do and revealed ways to identify them. Identification of perpetrators, heightened awareness of abuse, and giving women lifelines to get out of dangerous situations are all key to ending domestic violence.

Related Essays

  • Is the caste barrier breaking due to increased love marriages in India?
  • Religion Vs Nation - Write an essay on the harmony and the conflict?
  • Poverty and the Indian story of the numbers below the poverty line. What are the solutions?
  • Role of Social Media in Indian Politics

Top Civil Service Coaching Centers

  • IAS Coaching in Delhi
  • IAS Coaching in Mumbai
  • IAS Coaching in Chennai
  • IAS Coaching in Bangalore
  • IAS Coaching in Hyderabad

Top Pages for UPSC Coaching

  • UPSC Syllabus
  • IAS Full Form
  • UPSC Post List
  • UPSC Subject List
  • UPSC Age Limit
  • UPSC Prelims Syllabus Pdf
  • UPSC Notes Pdf in English
  • IAS Exam Preparation
  • Union Budget 2022 - 2023
  • UPSC Final Results 2019 New
  • UPSC Mains Results 2022 [ New ]
  • Free CSAT Practice Test
  • Practice Prelims Test Series 2024 [ New ]
  • UPSC Videos
  • Daily UPSC Current Affairs Quiz [ Free ]
  • UPSC Results
  • Prelims Question Papers
  • Prelims Marks Distribution
  • General Studies Notes [ Free ]
  • Current Affairs
  • UPSC Prelims Syllabus
  • UPSC Mains Syllabus
  • UPSC Jobs List
  • UPSC Subjects
  • IAS Full form
  • Free UPSC Material
  • IAS Exam Book
  • How to prepare for prelims 2023
  • How to prepare for CSAT
  • UPSC Study Material
  • UPSC Interview Questions
  • UPSC IAS Exam Questions
  • Economic Survey 2020-21 Download
  • Union Budget 2020-21 Download
  • National Education Policy 2020 Download
  • Daily UPSC Current Affairs Quiz
  • Union Budget 2022-23  

Civil Service Essay Contest Jan - Feb 2024

  • What is the profile of the first time voters in 2014 and what are their priorities and what should be their priorities in choosing a new government.
  • Relevance of Valentine's day in India. Discuss.

Civil Service Essay Contest (December 2023)

  • Is the caste barrier breaking due to increased love marriages in India? Views : 770
  • Is the caste barrier breaking due to increased love marriages in India? Views : 1362

domestic violence essay upsc

Current Affairs Analysis

Upsc civil service examination 2024 notification to be out on february 14, check details.

Views : 460

Tsunamis are here to stay as it hits Japan

Views : 2591

Floods and the Monsoon in India

Views : 2539

Use of AI in the field of meteorological research

Views : 838

Update on National TB Elimination Programme

Views : 3728

Goa Liberation Day

Views : 3502

domestic violence essay upsc

About Civil Service India

Civil Service India is a website dedicated to the Civil Services Exam conducted by UPSC. It guides you through the entire gambit of the IAS exam starting with notification, eligibility, syllabus, tips, quiz, notes and current affairs. A team of dedicated professionals are at work to help you!

Stay updated with Us

Phone : +91 96000 32187 / +91 94456 88445

Email : [email protected]

Apps for Civil Services Preparation

domestic violence essay upsc

  • TRP for UPSC Personality Test
  • Interview Mentorship Programme – 2023
  • Daily News & Analysis
  • Daily Current Affairs Quiz
  • Baba’s Explainer
  • Dedicated TLP Portal
  • 60 Day – Rapid Revision (RaRe) Series – 2023
  • English Magazines
  • Hindi Magazines
  • Yojana & Kurukshetra Gist
  • PT20 – Prelims Test Series
  • Gurukul Foundation
  • Gurukul Advanced – Launching Soon
  • Prelims Exclusive Programme (PEP)
  • Prelims Test Series (AIPTS)
  • S-ILP – English
  • S-ILP – हिंदी
  • Connect to Conquer(C2C) 2024
  • TLP Plus – 2024
  • TLP Connect – 2024
  • Public Administration FC – 2024
  • Anthropology Foundation Course
  • Anthropology Optional Test Series
  • Sociology Foundation Course – 2024
  • Sociology Test Series – 2023
  • Geography Optional Foundation Course
  • Geography Optional Test Series – Coming Soon!
  • PSIR Foundation Course
  • PSIR Test Series – Coming Soon
  • KPSC Foundation Course
  • CTI (COMMERCIAL TAX INSPECTOR) Test Series & Video Classes
  • Monthly Magazine

Domestic Violence

  • December 2, 2022

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Context: On the International Day for Elimination of All Forms of Violence against Women (November 25), the brutal murder and mutilation of a young woman by her partner has drawn attention to intimate partner violence, also recognized under the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005 (PWDVA) as a kind of domestic violence.

About Domestic Violence:

  • Abuse is physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person.
  • This includes any behaviors that frighten, intimidate, terrorize, manipulate, hurt, humiliate, blame, injure, or wound someone.
  • Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels.
  • Domestic violence is a punishable offence under Indian law. It is a violation of human rights.

Domestic violence in India:

National Family Health Survey-5 (2019-21):

  • 32% of ever-married women aged 18-49 years have ever experienced emotional, physical, or sexual violence committed by their husbands, with more rural than urban women reporting experiences of domestic violence. This does not even capture the prevalence of violence by other family members too.
  • The NFHS- 5 reports that only 14% of women who have experienced domestic violence have ever sought help, and this number is much lower in rural areas.
  • So ingrained are social norms about gender inequality that NFHS-5 data reports that women are more likely than men to justify a scenario in which it is acceptable for a husband to beat or hit his wife.

Issues associated with domestic violence:

domestic violence essay upsc

  • Despite the laws existing on paper, women are still largely unable to access the law in practice. Its promise and provisions are unevenly implemented, unavailable and out of reach for most Indian women.
  • the latest round of the National Family Health Survey-5 (2019-21) reveals that 32% of ever-married women aged 18-49 years have ever experienced emotional, physical, or sexual violence committed by their husbands, with more rural than urban women reporting experiences of domestic violence.
  • Despite almost a third of women being subject to domestic violence, the National Family Health Survey-5 (2019-21) reports that only 14% of women who have experienced domestic violence have ever sought help, and this number is much lower in rural areas.
  • Across many States, it is observed that the police were more likely to send women back to violent households to reconcile with the perpetrator or use violence against perpetrators as a deterrent instead of filing an official complaint or connecting women to protection officers and other service providers, as the PWDVA outlines they should.
  • Several States are yet to implement Protection officers. And where they are in post, they are under-resourced, under-skilled and overworked, making their remit impossible.
  • women did not want to be a ‘ burden’ on others, in particular their families . ‘
  • women believed that they would become a problem or a source of ‘tension’ for their families, bringing them shame and dishonour, irrespective of the survivor’s level of education, caste, or class.
  • The economic distress faced by millions due to the pandemic exacerbated the problem.

Role of the police :

  • Women who reported experiences of violence to the police were cynical about the outcome.
  • Though a small minority had positive experiences , for the majority of women, the police were part of the problem rather than a solution to violence.
  • Across the States, it is heard that the police were more likely to send women back to violent households to reconcile with the perpetrator or use violence against perpetrators as a deterrent instead of filing an official complaint or connecting women to protection officers and other service providers, as the PWDVA outlines they should.
  • Several States are yet to implement Protection officers and where they are in post, they are under-resourced, under-skilled, and overworked, making their remit impossible.

Governments Efforts:

  • It is a gender-specific law enacted to protect women against domestic violence
  • Further, the Criminal Law (Amendment) Act, of 2018 was enacted to prescribe even more stringent penal provisions including the death penalty for the rape of a girl below the age of 12 years.
  • The Government has set up the Nirbhaya Fund for projects for the safety and security of women , for which the Ministry of Women and Child Development is the nodal authority for appraising/ recommending the proposals/schemes to be funded under the Nirbhaya Fund.
  • In order to coordinate various initiatives for women’s safety, MHA has set up a Women Safety Division.
  • The government of India conducts awareness generation programmes and publicity campaigns on various laws relating to women and their rights through workshops, cultural programmes, seminars, training programmes, advertisements in print and electronic media etc.

Way Forward:

  • The intervention should begin by focusing on gender equality in education since the quality of education received by women has not equipped them to question the patriarchy.
  • the government should understand and recognise domestic violence of any form as a crime and not just a ‘family issue’ .
  • Trauma-informed institutional response , revamping of the support systems based on impact assessments and increasing the number of one-stop centres with adequate professionals are some of the other measures needed.
  • There is a need for sustained and intensified campaigns and the strengthening of institutions with wider representation.
  • Creating and publicising a directory of services which can be accessed by survivors and their relatives or friends with information and mobile numbers during a crisis.
  • Data and Information systems must be strengthened for better evidence-informed policy to address the issue of domestic violence in India.

Source: The Hindu

For a dedicated peer group, Motivation & Quick updates, Join our official telegram channel – https://t.me/IASbabaOfficialAccount

Subscribe to our YouTube Channel HERE to watch Explainer Videos, Strategy Sessions, Toppers Talks & many more…

domestic violence essay upsc

Related Posts :

Integrating tribal knowledge systems, indo-pacific relations.

domestic violence essay upsc

  • DAILY CURRENT AFFAIRS IAS | UPSC Prelims and Mains Exam – 9th February 2024
  • UPSC Quiz – 2024 : IASbaba’s Daily Current Affairs Quiz 16th February 2024
  • [INTERVIEW INITIATIVE] Think, Rethink and Perform (TRP) [DAY 24] 2023 for UPSC/IAS Personality Test!
  • UPSC Quiz – 2024 : IASbaba’s Daily Current Affairs Quiz 15th February 2024
  • DAILY CURRENT AFFAIRS IAS | UPSC Prelims and Mains Exam – 14th February 2024
  • [OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT] UPSC Civil Services (Preliminary) Examination Notification, 2024 Released – 1056 Vacancies
  • UPSC Quiz – 2024 : IASbaba’s Daily Current Affairs Quiz 14th February 2024
  • [INTERVIEW INITIATIVE] Think, Rethink and Perform (TRP) [DAY 23] 2023 for UPSC/IAS Personality Test!
  • DAILY CURRENT AFFAIRS IAS | UPSC Prelims and Mains Exam – 13th February 2024
  • UPSC Quiz – 2024 : IASbaba’s Daily Current Affairs Quiz 13th February 2024

Don’t lose out on any important Post and Update. Learn everyday with Experts!!

Email Address

Search now.....

Sign up to receive regular updates.

Sign Up Now !

domestic violence essay upsc

  • Skip to primary navigation
  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to primary sidebar

UPSC: Latest News, IAS, IPS, UPSC Preparation

Enroll in ClearIAS UPSC Coaching Join Now Log In

Call us: +91-9605741000

Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005

Last updated on February 20, 2023 by Alex Andrews George

Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005

Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005 is a major bill passed by the Indian Parliament during the UPA1 government regime (2005).

The law is crucial, as it helps in the protection of women from the violence, she faces in the place she lives in.

Table of Contents

Salient features of Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005

  • Includes physical and mental ill-treatment.
  • Primarily meant for the protection of wife or female live-in partners.
  • Law also extends to sisters, widows, or mothers.
  • Harassment in the form of dowry demands also included in this law.
  • Gives women the right to secure housing .
  • The court can also issue protection orders that prevent the abuser to harass the women by acts at her workplace.
  • The act proposes the appointment of protection officers and NGOs.
  • A breach of a protection order is a non-bailable offense.

Criticisms of Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005

  • Abused men not covered; this law is specifically for women.
  • Violence against women is often perpetrated by women herself – Eg: Mother-in-law/ Daughter-in-law.
  • Verbal abuse and mental harassment are subjective terms.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Follow ClearIAS!

Subscribe ClearIAS YouTube Channel

# Trending Now on ClearIAS

Csat course.

Join CSAT Course

Current Affairs Course

Join Current Affairs Course

  • UPSC Prelims Test Series

Join Prelims Test Series

UPSC Prelims Marks Booster

Join Prelims Marks Booster

Join ClearIAS Courses!

What makes ClearIAS special: Explore ClearIAS Courses

About Alex Andrews George

Alex Andrews George is a mentor, author, and social entrepreneur. Alex is the founder of ClearIAS and one of the expert Civil Service Exam Trainers in India.

He is the author of many best-seller books like 'Important Judgments that transformed India' and 'Important Acts that transformed India'.

A trusted mentor and pioneer in online training , Alex's guidance, strategies, study-materials, and mock-exams have helped many aspirants to become IAS, IPS, and IFS officers.

Reader Interactions

domestic violence essay upsc

May 20, 2020 at 3:23 pm

Only this much information!!!

May 20, 2020 at 3:24 pm

You should give more information

domestic violence essay upsc

February 8, 2021 at 1:27 pm

Not up-to mark

domestic violence essay upsc

February 14, 2022 at 6:59 pm

Come on man increase the content , as with us the competition between coaching institutes is also high.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Don’t lose out without playing the right game!

Follow the ClearIAS Prelims cum Mains (PCM) Integrated Approach.

Join ClearIAS PCM Course Now

UPSC Online Preparation

  • Union Public Service Commission (UPSC)
  • Indian Administrative Service (IAS)
  • Indian Police Service (IPS)
  • IAS Exam Eligibility
  • UPSC Free Study Materials
  • UPSC Exam Guidance
  • UPSC Syllabus
  • UPSC Online
  • UPSC Prelims
  • UPSC Interview
  • UPSC Toppers
  • UPSC Previous Year Qns
  • UPSC Age Calculator
  • UPSC Calendar 2024
  • About ClearIAS
  • ClearIAS Programs
  • ClearIAS Fee Structure
  • IAS Coaching
  • UPSC Coaching
  • UPSC Online Coaching
  • ClearIAS Blog
  • Important Updates
  • Announcements
  • Book Review
  • ClearIAS App
  • Work with us
  • Advertise with us
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms and Conditions
  • Talk to Your Mentor

Featured on

ClearIAS Featured in The Hindu

and many more...

Admissions Open: UPSC PCM 2025

Thank You 🙌

domestic violence essay upsc

  • IAS Preparation
  • UPSC Preparation Strategy
  • Gist Of Rajya Sabha TV
  • Violence Against Women Rstv Big Picture

Violence Against Women: RSTV – Big Picture

domestic violence essay upsc

Violence Against Women:- Download PDF Here

Anchor – Vishal Dahiya

Guests – Rekha Agarwal, Advocate, Supreme Court;

               Yogita Bayana, Women’s Rights Activist;

               Lalitha Kumaramangalam, Former Chairman, National Commission for Women;

              Jyoti Singhal, Deputy Secretary, National Commission for Women.

  • Every year, 25th November is observed as International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and this year the theme is “Generation Equality Stands Against Rape”. 
  • Despite the safety and security of women having been accorded utmost priority by the Government in India and several steps taken over the years to tackle the issue, violence against women continues being an obstacle in achieving equality, development, peace, and fulfillment of women’s and girls’ human rights. 

How are Women Affected?

  • Apart from physical abuse, women suffer from emotional and mental abuse too. 
  • When it comes to the perpetrator of abuse, a segment of society that goes unnoticed is the family members. It demands a lot of courage for the woman to stand up against her own family.
  • Equality amongst both sexes in the present situation seems like a utopian idea.
  • The conditioning at homes and the inter-generational effect, of violence against women, is through the family. 
  • Social media influence, such as movies also paint a wrong picture of women,  and push young minds into confusing reality with the “life on screen”. 
  • For example, constant callings might be portrayed as the correct way to approach women in movies, but in reality, it is called stalking and is an offense according to the Criminal Amendment Act of 2013.
  • We all, as a society, as individuals and activists have to work towards curbing and finding solutions for this issue. 
  • Crime and violence against women are on the rise as indicated by the increase in the cases being reported. 
  • The sex ratio is indicative of the violence against the female foetus. 
  • According to a World Health Organization (WHO) report, one in every three women and girls experience physical or sexual violence in their lifetime, most frequently by an intimate partner. 
  • Rape is one of the social problems and the victims suffer from physical, mental, and emotional consequences and various other traumas which affect their life negatively.
  • The number of crimes committed against women increased by 6 percent according to the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) report of 2017. 94 percent of the rapes were registered under ‘Cruelty by Husband or Relatives.’ However, marital rape is not identified in India.
  • The Sexual Harassment of Women at Workplace (Prevention, Prohibition and Redressal) Act , 2013 protects women from sexual harassment at their place of work.
  • For every rape reported, there are many which go unrecorded as patriarchal mindsets remain unchanged despite the constitutional safeguards and positive affirmations.

Delay in the Justice System

  • Justice delayed is justice denied . Most of the crimes against women take a lot of time to be given justice and a resolution as there is a shortage of judges. The justice system often fails women, and they don’t report the complaint mostly.

Women get Tired of Waiting for Justice and Give up.

  • Delay in providing justice is another reason why men have a sense of impunity. 
  • In the NIRBHAYA case, a fast-track trial court sentenced four to death in September 2013, while the only juvenile accused was freed after a stint at a remand home. The Supreme Court dismissed their appeals against conviction in 2017; two years on, the convicts have filed curative petitions in the court and one has already written to the President of India for clemency.
  • The fundamental presumption is “Innocent until proven guilty.” Every citizen is liable to get their chance to prove their innocence.
  • The goal is to establish equality, which means both sides have to be analyzed in detail before pronouncing judgment to ensure the system is foolproof. 

Measures Taken and Spread of Awareness

  • The statistics show that even in Haryana, the sex ratio has gone up substantially in the last 6-7 years due to the campaign.
  • The police need to be sensitized as most women complain of police apathy. 
  • A program has been initiated for the gender sensitization and legal awareness of school students to help them understand such grave issues at a young age.
  • Legal awareness programs with stakeholders are also being conducted by the NCW, wherein they are taught about the legal rights of women.

Legal Rights and Laws

India has specially made laws for violence against women.

  • For example, the Domestic Violence Act , the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences ( POCSO Act ), and the POSH Act (for the protection of women from sexual offenses at the workplace) are some of the few laws for curbing violence against women.
  • It is known as “zero FIR” as seen in the Asaram case. 
  • The zero FIR can be filed irrespective of the jurisdiction.
  • Fast Track Courts to deal Rape Cases – Fast Track Courts have been set up for speeding up the trial process through so that the victims get speedy justice without undue delay.
  • Nirbhaya Fund: Nirbhaya Fund is a Rs.10 billion corpus announced by the Government of India in its 2013 Union Budget. This fund is expected to support initiatives by the government and NGOs working towards protecting the dignity and ensuring the safety of women in India.
  • Counsellors should be present in the police stations, especially in the violence against women’s cells as in the case of Delhi Police Stations.
  • However, those counsellors need to be warned against the pitfalls of their work, as they can also be subject to harassment, threats, and violence.
  • People in public services themselves have a skewed view of equity.
  • Unless there is mutual respect and equity amongst sexes, the number of cases reported might increase but the violence against women will not decrease.

Way Forward

  • The change will not come with just written laws but from the change in the way people think. 
  • While providing justice to women, the justice system must not be unjust to a man. Hence the decision should be made only after a detailed analysis of the case.
  • The issue also has to be discussed more often and not kept hidden in shadows as prevention is the best cure.
  • The education of children should be extended to society regardless of the income, city or even the suburb, to have some effect on the continuing violence against women.
  • Educating girls about good touch and bad touch as early as possible so that they are equipped to understand this sensitive issue. Self-defense classes should be introduced in school to enable the students to be aware of the dangers they may encounter.
  • Society has to realize and understand, the responsibility of a woman isn’t confined or limited to just being a good wife.
  • The pressure on law enforcement agencies to show records of falling crimes pushes them to not file FIRs. So, the police shouldn’t be kept under pressure.
  • Spread Awareness: People need to be educated about zero FIR, as most of the women and men are ignorant of the legal rights of women.
  • The law enforcement agencies need to be more empathetic. Most women report the police to be apathetic when they go to report issues of violence.
  • No one person can be held accountable. 
  • It requires the combined efforts of every citizen, every family and then the government to prevent such crimes from happening in the future. 
  • The government and laws cannot change society. Society has to change by itself. The efforts are very much in line with the Gandhian philosophy to being the change one wants.

Read previous RSTV articles here .

The above details would help candidates prepare for UPSC 2020 .

Related Links

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Your Mobile number and Email id will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Request OTP on Voice Call

Post My Comment

domestic violence essay upsc

IAS 2024 - Your dream can come true!

Download the ultimate guide to upsc cse preparation.

  • Share Share

Register with BYJU'S & Download Free PDFs

Register with byju's & watch live videos.

Next IAS

  • भाषा : हिंदी
  • Classroom Courses
  • Our Selections
  • Student Login
  • About NEXT IAS
  • Director’s Desk
  • Advisory Panel
  • Faculty Panel
  • General Studies Courses
  • Optional Courses
  • Interview Guidance Program
  • Postal Courses
  • Test Series
  • Current Affairs
  • Student Portal

Logo

The brutal murder and mutilation of a young woman by her partner have drawn attention to intimate partner violence, also recognized under the P rotection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005 (PWDVA) as a kind of domestic violence.  

About Domestic Violence

  • Abuse is physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person. This includes any behaviors that frighten, intimidate, terrorize, manipulate, hurt, humiliate, blame, injure, or wound someone. 
  • Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels. 
  • Domestic violence is a punishable offence under Indian law. It is a violation of human rights. 

Issues /Challenges 

  • Its promise and provisions are unevenly implemented, unavailable and out of reach for most Indian women.
  • the latest round of the National Family Health Survey-5 (2019-21) reveals that 32% of ever-married women aged 18-49 years have ever experienced emotional, physical, or sexual violence committed by their husbands, with more rural than urban women reporting experiences of domestic violence. 
  • Despite almost a third of women being subject to domestic violence , the National Family Health Survey-5 (2019-21 ) reports that only 14% of women who have experienced domestic violence have ever sought help, and this number is much lower in rural areas.  
  • Across the States, it is observed that the police were more likely to send women back to violent households to reconcile with the perpetrator or use violence against perpetrators as a deterrent instead of filing an official complaint or connecting women to protection officers and other service providers, as the PWDVA outlines they should. 
  • Several States are yet to implement Protection officers . And where they are in post, t hey are under-resourced, under-skilled and overworked, making their remit impossible.
  • women did not want to be a ‘burden’ on others, in particular their families. ‘
  • women believed that they would become a problem or a source of ‘tension’ for their families, bringing them shame and dishonour, irrespective of the survivor’s level of education, caste, or class.
  •  The economic distress faced by millions due to the pandemic exacerbated the problem.

Governments Efforts 

  • Over 17 years ago the PWDVA, a progressive legislation, was passed, promising a joined-up approach — involving civil and criminal protections — to support and protect women from violence within the household
  • It is a gender-specific law enacted to protect women against domestic violence 
  • Further, the Criminal Law (Amendment) Act, of 2018 was enacted to prescribe even more stringent penal provisions including the death penalty for the rape of a girl below the age of 12 years. 
  • The Government has set up the Nirbhaya Fund for projects for the safety and security of women, for which the Ministry of Women and Child Development is the nodal authority for appraising/ recommending the proposals/schemes to be funded under the Nirbhaya Fund.
  •  In order to coordinate various initiatives for women’s safety, MHA has set up a Women Safety Division.
  • The government of India conducts awareness generation programmes and publicity campaigns on various laws relating to women and their rights through workshops, cultural programmes, seminars, training programmes, advertisements in print and electronic media etc.

Suggestions and Way Forward 

  • The intervention should begin by focusing on gender equality in education since the quality of education received by women has not equipped them to question the patriarchy.
  • the government should understand and recognise domestic violence of any form as a crime and not just a ‘family issue’. 
  • Trauma-informed institutional response, r evamping of the support systems based on impact assessments and increasing the number of one-stop centres with adequate professionals are some of the other measures needed 
  • There is a need for sustained and intensified campaigns and the strengthening of institutions with wider representation.
  • Creating and publicising a directory of services which can be accessed by survivors and their relatives or friends with information and mobile numbers during a crisis.
  • Data and Information systems must be strengthened for better evidence-informed policy to address the issue of domestic violence in India. 

RELATED ARTICLES MORE FROM AUTHOR

Sc strikes down electoral bonds scheme, menstrual leave and gender gap, india joins the race for lithium reserves, daily current affairs 17-02-2024.

Logo

Updated 6:15 p.m.

Two Burnsville police officers and a paramedic were shot and killed early Sunday morning while responding to a call for help about a man armed and barricaded in a home with seven children inside.

The men killed were identified by the city as officers Paul Elmstrand and Matthew Ruge, both age 27, and 40-year-old firefighter-paramedic Adam Finseth. Another officer, Sgt. Adam Medlicott, was injured and taken to a hospital with what are believed to be non-life-threatening injuries.

Burnsville officers and firefighters

Officials said the shooter is dead and there is no ongoing threat. They didn’t say how he died. The man’s name is expected to be disclosed following an autopsy planned for Monday. The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension is investigating.

The children, ages 2 to 15, were able to leave the house safely after the incident ended, authorities said. But the death of three public servants shot and killed in the line of duty gripped Burnsville and the entire community of fire and law enforcement on Sunday.

Grow the Future of Public Media

MPR News is supported by Members. Gifts from individuals power everything you find here. Make a gift of any amount today to become a Member!

At an emotional late-afternoon press conference, Burnsville officials spoke of the men as heroes dedicated to their communities and to keeping people safe.

“Today, three members of our team made the ultimate sacrifice for this community,” Tanya Schwartz, Burnsville’s police chief, told reporters. In the world of public safety, people sign up understanding they may someday have to give up their lives, she added, “and they do it anyways.”

“There are no words to describe what these public safety families are going through right now,” added Fire Chief BJ Jungmann. Finseth, he said, was a paramedic trained for crisis situations — badge No. 83. Those in public safety work understand the worst might happen, but “no one expects it to happen.”

Burnsville Shooting Incident

Report of a man armed, barricaded

Burnsville police were called at 1:50 a.m. to the 12600 block of 33rd Avenue South on a report of a “domestic situation where a man reported to be armed was barricaded with family members. After arriving, the situation escalated into gunfire with responders,” the city said in a statement.

Bureau of Criminal Apprehension Superintendent Drew Evans told reporters the shooter had multiple guns, a lot of ammunition and shot at first responders from several locations in the house. One of the officers, he said, was in the house when he was shot.

Having young children inside the home made the situation even more harrowing, he added.

The initial call for help, he said, came from someone inside the house. The suspect was already barricaded in the home when officers arrived and they spent “a lot of time” negotiating with him.

Burnsville Shooting Incident

Several officers did return fire but the exact exchange of gunfire that occurred still hasn’t been pieced together, Evans said as he asked for patience while the BCA pursued its investigation.

Burnsville officials said Elmstrand joined the department in August 2017 as a community service officer and was promoted to officer in July 2019. He was part of the department’s mobile command staff and served on its honor guard.

Ruge joined the department in April 2020 and was part of its crisis negotiations team.

Finseth had been a Burnsville firefighter and paramedic since February 2019.

‘Heard 40 or 50 gunshots’

Neighbors on Sunday described awakening to the sounds of early morning gunshots.

Alex Martinez and Carmen Schaffer said their house, which sits across from where the shooting happened, was hit by gunfire several times. They said they saw children later being brought out of the house and they seemed to be OK.

Neighbor Chuck Kriss said at around 5 a.m. he and his family heard sounds they first thought were knocking sounds before realizing later they were gunshots.

“We went to our back window and we saw ... a flash, which we learned later on it seems like it was flash bangs and we probably heard 40 or 50 gunshots up and back.”

Burnsville Shooting Incident

Anna Edmunds said she heard popping sounds before 5 a.m. but couldn’t see anything right away.

“Even like a couple of minutes later it was like there were a couple more popping sounds and then everything just kind of stopped,” Edmunds said. “And all of a sudden there’s police everywhere and there’s like literally every corner, there’s like a fire truck or there’s like a police [or] ATV.”

Edmunds said she got a shelter in place message from the Burnsville Police Department about an hour after first hearing shots.

Burnsville officials asked people to stay away from the scene as investigators do their work.

Burnsville Shooting Incident

‘Heartbroken’

At Hennepin Healthcare hospital in Minneapolis, the region’s major trauma care facility, streets were blocked off in the late morning by law enforcement, with Burnsville fire trucks outside along with more than 100 law enforcement vehicles from around the metro area.

A procession of law enforcement and first responders later accompanied the bodies of the officers and paramedic as they were driven to the office of the Hennepin County Medical Examiner.

Gov. Tim Walz has ordered flags to be flown at half staff in the state beginning Monday at sunrise.

News of the killings on Sunday prompted an outpouring of messages of grief and condolences from across Minnesota’s political spectrum and its law enforcement community.

  • Killed or wounded by gunfire Recent incidents against law enforcement officers in Minnesota, neighboring states

Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association Executive Director Brian Peters said, “We are heartbroken. Our law enforcement community is heartbroken. We’re just devastated at the horrific loss. These heroes leave behind loved ones and a community who will forever remember their bravery and dedication to keeping Minnesotans safe.”

Gregg Lindberg, Burnsville’s city manager, called it a “difficult and emotional day here for our community and our team. Words can’t express how hard today has been.”

Watch: Burnsville officials, BCA brief reporters

  • Recent incidents of law enforcement officers killed or wounded by gunfire in Minnesota, neighboring states
  • Feds charge Minnesota man who they say trained with ISIS and threatened violence against New York
  • FBI informant charged with lying about Joe and Hunter Biden's ties to Ukrainian energy company

IMAGES

  1. ≫ Domestic Violence Against Women Free Essay Sample on Samploon.com

    domestic violence essay upsc

  2. Domestic Violence Essay

    domestic violence essay upsc

  3. Domestic Violence Essay

    domestic violence essay upsc

  4. Essay: Effects of Domestic Violence

    domestic violence essay upsc

  5. Domestic Violence Free Essay Example

    domestic violence essay upsc

  6. Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, 2005 UPSC

    domestic violence essay upsc

VIDEO

  1. What would you do against Domestic violence 😱😱

  2. Domestic violence? 😢

  3. Legal Framework for Dealing with Victims in India

  4. Emotions and Violence [Final video essay] EPCOT

  5. TNPSC GROUP II/IIA Mains2023 |Socio|Part5 |Social Injustice to Women| Domestic Violonce|Mr.Saravanan

  6. अब पति पत्नी पर section 12a domestic violence act 2005 यानी घरेलू हिंसा का केस कर सकता है खुशखबरी

COMMENTS

  1. Violence Against Women

    Men are more likely to perpetrate violence if they have low education, a history of child maltreatment, exposure to domestic violence against their mothers, harmful use of alcohol, unequal gender norms including attitudes accepting of violence, and a sense of entitlement over women.

  2. PDF Domestic Violence against Women

    Introduction Women have always been ill-treated and deprived of their right to life and personal liberty as provided under the constitution of India. Women are considered as a physically and emotionally weaker than the males, whereas at present women have proved themselves in almost every field of life affirming that they are no less than men

  3. Violence Against Women

    UN General Assembly in 1993, defines violence against women as "any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life."

  4. Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, 2005

    The Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, 2005 was enacted by the Parliament of India to provide for more effective protection of the rights of women guaranteed under the Constitution who are victims of violence of any kind occurring within the family and other related incidents. This article will discuss one of the important acts ...

  5. SANSAD TV: 75 YEARS: LAWS THAT SHAPED INDIA- THE ...

    Introduction: A major breakthrough in women's rights in India, The Protection of Women from Domestic Violence, 2005 was enacted by the Parliament to provide protection to women against violence from family. Domestic violence: Causing hurt, injury or danger to life, limb, health, safety or well-being, whether mental or physical.

  6. Domestic Violence During Lockdown

    9 min read Tags: GS Paper - 1 GS Paper - 2 Issues Related to Women Salient Features of Indian Society This article is based on "Addressing domestic violence: A forgotten agenda while locking India down" which was published in Observer Research Foundation on 08/04/2020.

  7. Violence Against Women in India UPSC: Causes, Forms, and Solutions

    Liz Kelly has defined Violence Against Women in India as "any physical, visual, verbal or sexual act that is experienced by the woman or girl at the time or later as a threat, invasion or assault, that has the effect of hurting or disregarding or removing the ability to control one's own behaviour or an interaction, whether this be within the wo...

  8. Domestic violence, how can we control it?

    Domestic violence is a reflection of our pseudo-civilized society. Violence has no place in a civilized world. But the number of cases that occur each year raise a high alarm. And this is not the whole picture, as; Most cases go unregistered or unnoticed in everyday life.

  9. SC on Crimes and Violence Against Women

    Why in News. Recently, the Supreme Court has said that crimes against women continued in a "never-ending cycle" in India. Key Points. Judgement: The judgement dealt with the statutory scheme of the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, 2005. It has allowed women fighting domestic violence cases the right to reside in the 'shared household' even if her husband had no legal ...

  10. Domestic Violence

    Domestic violence can be defined as a pattern of behavior in any relationship that is used to gain or maintain power and control over an intimate partner. Abuse is physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person.

  11. Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, 2005

    This article will delve into the nuances of the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, 2005, which is a crucial component of the IAS Exam . This subject is beneficial for both GS Paper I (to comprehend Indian society) and GS Paper-II of the UPSC Syllabus . Candidates can explore additional important acts related to women's rights and ...

  12. Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005

    Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005 is a major bill passed by the Indian Parliament during the UPA1 government regime (2005). The law is crucial, as it helps in the protection of women from the violence, she faces in the place she lives in. Table of Contents Salient features of Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005

  13. Violence Against Women: RSTV

    Violence against women starts at home. The conditioning at homes and the inter-generational effect, of violence against women, is through the family. Women are brought up with the mentality of dedicating themselves to the family. This causes them to go through mental abuse and depression.

  14. Domestic Violence Against the Women

    Domestic violence can be described as the power misused by one adult in a relationship to control another. It is the establishment of control and fear in a relationship through violence and other forms of abuse. This violence can take the form of physical assault, psychological abuse, social abuse, financial abuse, or sexual assault.

  15. Nightmare for Domestic Violence survivors

    Despite almost a third of women being subject to domestic violence, the National Family Health Survey-5 (2019-21) reports that only 14% of women who have experienced domestic violence have ever sought help, and this number is much lower in rural areas. Women who reported experiences of violence to the police were cynical about the outcome.

  16. Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005

    The Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005 plays a critical role in the Indian legal system vis-a-vis protecting the rights of women.Domestic Violence Act 2005 was enacted to provide more effective protection of the rights of women guaranteed under the Constitution who are victims of violence of any kind occurring within the family and for matters connected therewith or incidental ...

  17. PDF Dating Violence Among College Students

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is defined as "physical, sexual, or psychological harm to a person by a current or former partner or spouse" (Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2005). Dating violence involves abusive behaviors that occur within the context of a dating relationship in which two individuals share an emotional,

  18. Domestic Violence

    The Family Violence Center. 1671 The Alameda, Ste 100. San Jose, CA 95126. 408-277-3700. The goal of the Family Violence Center is to address family violence issues by serving as the core for a multi-agency effort. The Family Violence Unit is staffed by representatives of the Police Department, Department of Family and Children's Services ...

  19. Two officers, one medic killed responding to domestic abuse call in

    Updated 2:07 p.m. Two Burnsville police officers and a paramedic were shot and killed early Sunday morning while responding to a domestic abuse call for assistance in the south Twin Cities suburb.

  20. Rising Complaints of Crimes Against Women: NCW

    Violence against women is a social, economic, developmental, legal, educational, human right, and health (physical and mental) issue. Since the outbreak of Covid-19, emerging data and reports from those on the front lines, have shown that all types of violence against women and girls, particularly domestic violence, has intensified. Reasons:

  21. Domestic Violence Restraining Orders

    If you need emergency shelter, help with your restraining order, or support in court, call one of the phone numbers below to get help from domestic violence resources in your community: For North County, call YWCA Domestic Violence Department 24-hour crisis hotline (800) 572-2782. For Central County, call Next Door Solutions to Domestic ...

  22. 𝐉.𝐞𝐱𝐚 𝐊𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐚 on Instagram: "In 2021, I applied for college and wrote

    111 likes, 4 comments - its.jexa on February 17, 2024: "In 2021, I applied for college and wrote about the domestic violence I experienced. I was 16 year..." ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 𝐉.𝐞𝐱𝐚 𝐊𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐚 on Instagram: "In 2021, I applied for college and wrote about the domestic violence I experienced.

  23. Domestic Violence Unit of The Family Violence Division

    The Domestic Violence Unit of the Family Violence Division prosecutes domestic violence crimes. This includes misdemeanors and felonies. The Domestic Violence Unit of the Family Violence Division reviews all such cases and determines what charges will be filed. It is our philosophy that domestic violence is a crime against society (not a ...

  24. Change in the Provision of the Domestic Violence Act

    Background. A Bench of Justices D.Y. Chandrachud and Hemant Gupta interpreted the provisions of the Domestic Violence Act of 2005 to confirm an order of a Panipat Sessions Judge that respondent should pay maintenance to the widow and minor child of his dead brother. Both brothers lived in the ancestral family home on different floors.