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Dissertation Defense Announcements

Dissertation Defense Calendar

ELMOHANAD ELSAYAD. Does Virtuality Matter? A Moderated Model of Project Risks and Performance by Degree of Virtual Communication

(Under the direction of DR. FRANZ KELLERMANNS)

As remote work gains popularity due to the rise of virtual communication tools post the COVID 19 pandemic, understanding its impact on project management is crucial. This dissertation investigates the moderating effect of virtual communication on the relationship between project risks and performance. The study presents robust evidence that virtuality significantly and negatively moderates the influence of organizational risks on performance. These findings offer valuable insights into the complexities of virtual project environments, underscoring the need for strategic virtual engagement in managing project risks to avoid performance detriments. The research contributes to project management literature by delineating when and how virtual tools should be employed to optimize project outcomes

Silicon carbide (SiC) has excellent thermomechanical properties, and it is one of the most promising candidates for many demanding high temperature applications in military, aerospace, space mirrors, nuclear energy stations, filtering, and furnace. Manufacturing of SiC product is difficult due to its thermochemical and mechanical stabilities. The additive manufacturing (AM) of SiC has drawn a lot of attention in recent years due to these excellent materials properties and diverse applications. Previous studies from our lab have shown that the creation of a silica gel layer on the surface of SiC using NaOH solution activated the surface and allowed 3D printing of SiC using water based binder in a powder bed binder jet printer. The dried silica gel layer binds adjacent SiC particles upon hydration during 3D printing at room temperature. The 3D printed green parts require a secondary surface activation by impregnating in NaOH solution and thermal treatment to enhance density and strength. The secondary surface activation technique creates an additional silica layer on the surface of SiC at room temperature which can lead to the growth of silica nanowire inside the pore of 3D printed SiC parts upon heat treatment. The hypotheses underlying this approach are twofold: (i) maximum growth of the silica nanowires will facilitate densification and mechanical properties, and (ii) The silica gel layer can mediate a strong bond between SiC and silicate minerals such as mullite. This thesis has three main objectives. First to understand the effect of processing parameters including concentration of NaOH, thermal treatment temperature and dwelling time on silica nanowires growth and subsequent density and mechanical properties, second, to develop and validate a mathematical model for silica nanowires’ growth and ceramic strengthening, and the third objective is to examine the role of the silica gel layer and thermal treatment parameters on in situ mineralization of mullite bonding agent for SiC composite. This thesis is structured into two parts: (i) experimentally optimizing the processing parameters for silica (SiO2) nanowire growth inside the pore of 3D printed SiC discs based on quantitative SEM analysis and development of a mathematical growth model for silica nanowire growth, and (ii) creating in situ synthesized liquid mullite as a secondary binder phase for the densification and strengthening of 3D SiC manufactured using powder metallurgy technique.

We found that the silica nanowire growth rate and number density depend on the processing parameters such as NaOH concentration, sintering temperature, and time. Therefore, the goal of the first part of this dissertation is to investigate the effect of the processing parameters on nanowire growth and number density. Utilizing quantitative SEM image analysis and a silica nanowire growth model, the focus is on optimizing processing parameters to achieve maximum nanowire growth and density, ultimately enhancing the densification and mechanical properties of 3D printed SiC components. The silica nanowire was grown inside the pore of 3D printed SiC disc through the vapor solid (VS) noncatalytic mechanism. In this process silica (SiO2) vapor condensed directly onto the SiC particle surface, leading to the nucleation and growth of one-dimensional silica nanostructures. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis were performed on SiC disc prepared via the powder metallurgy technique using NaOH solutions at varying concentrations (5%, 10%, and 20%). The thermal analysis helped us determine the nucleation temperature of silica droplets at 525 °C and crystallization temperature at 800 °C. The effect of NaOH concentrations analysis showed that the nanowire number density (mm-2) as well as the width and length of the nanowires increased according to the concentration of the NaOH used to pretreat 3D printed SiC in the order 20% > 10% > 5%. The optimal combination of NaOH concentration and heat treatment parameters identified for the highest nanowire number density and nanowire growth involved impregnating with 10% NaOH and heat treating at 550 °C for 6 hours and 1100 °C for 4 hours. The resulting sample exhibited a nanowire number density of 55431 ± 9232 mm-2, majority of the nanowires were in the width range of 0.3 µm – 0.6 µm, and length of 25.6 ± 3.3 µm as determined through quantitative SEM image analysis. The compressive strength, density and porosity were found to be 9.86 ± 1.4 MPa, 2.27 gcm-3, and 38.32%, respectively. Subsequently, a mathematical nanowire growth model was developed in order to investigate the growth mechanism and understand the effect of reaction kinetics on the nanowire growth. The model accounted for the reaction kinetics controlling the formation of silica molecule and its subsequent deposition on nanowire top surface contributing to the growth of the nanowire. The change in nanowire length relation with respect to different processing parameters obtained from the model showed a good agreement with the experimental data.

The silica gel layer on the surface activated SiC particles transforms into cristobalite (SiO2) upon heat treatment which serves as a binding agent that holds the SiC particles together. However, cristobalite has relatively poor mechanical strength and thermal properties compared to SiC. Therefore, in the second part of this dissertation, an in-situ mullite binding agent was formed which has superior thermomechanical properties compared to SiO2. Additionally, it has thermomechanical and chemical properties comparable to those of SiC. We have reported on using coal fly ash as a source of alumina (Al2O3) that reacts in situ with the silica (SiO2), oxidation product of SiC. The instantaneous mullite formation on the surface of SiC facilitated due to presence of minor concentrations of metal oxides in coal fly ash, resulted in a strong bonding zone between the two phases at relatively low temperature. In this work, SiC was mixed with coal fly ash at weight ratios of 90SiC/10ash, 85SiC/15ash, 80SiC/20ash, and 75SiC/25ash and sintered at 1400 °C. Measurements of mechanical properties showed that the 85SiC/15ash composition had the highest mechanical strength among samples. XRD analysis showed the phase composition of thermally treated 85SiC/15ash to be 81.8 wt% SiC, 11.4 wt% mullite, and 6.8 wt% cristobalite. SEM-EDX revealed a concentration gradient of Al in the cristobalite which enhanced formation of functionally graded bonding zones between phases and resulted in SiC-mullite composite with high thermomechanical properties. The compressive strength, nanoindentation elastic modulus, and Vickers hardness were 434 ± 20 MPa, 370.9 ± 22.6 GPa, and 11.5 ± 1.2 GPa respectively. The thermal shock resistance test showed high dimensional and mechanical stabilities after quenching in liquid nitrogen (−196 °C) from 1400 °C. The SiC-mullite composite showed low thermal expansion co-efficient from 3.17 x 10-7 /K to 5.615 x 10-6 /K when the sample was heated from 182 K to 354 K. The specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity were 7.83 ± 0.0014 J/g.K, 1.04 ± 0.013 mm2/s, and 17 W/m.K at 100 °C, respectively. The SiC-mullite composite exhibited moderate electrical conductivity of 3.48 x 10-2 S/m at 1000 °C. The resulting SiC-mullite composite is suitable for high temperature applications such as diesel motor parts, gas turbines, industrial heat exchangers, fusion reactor parts, high-temperature energy exchanger systems, and hot gas filters due to its high mechanical strength and thermal shock-resistance. This work demonstrated the potential of utilizing an in-situ mullite bonding agent instead of silica layer in additive manufacturing of SiC in the powder bed binder jet process for achieving a dense SiC parts with high thermomechanical properties.

The overall aims of this dissertation were to identify factors that impacted 30-day COPD readmissions, inpatient mortality, and overall cost of care. Differences in area of residence were also assessed for all three outcomes. Finally, comorbidities were analyzed to determine their effects on 30-day readmission rates, inpatient mortality, and total cost of care. This dissertation employed quantitative research and used data from the 2016 Nationwide Readmission Database dataset (NRD) and the 2016 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample Database dataset from the Health Care Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). Descriptive statistics were used to report mean (standard deviation, SD) for continuous variables. Binary logistic regression and multiple logistic regression were used for categorical variables. Chi-square testing was used to determine significance of the association between independent and dependent variables related to mortality. A generalized linear model (GLM) with family gamma, long link and margins command was used in the cost analysis. Findings from these studies outlined several variables that led to increased readmission, increased odds of mortality, and increased overall cost of care. When looking at differences depending on residence; insurance type, hospital location, age, median household income, and certain comorbidities had effects on readmission rates, odds of mortality, and overall costs.

An in-depth analysis of a distinctive electric machine topology characterized by a doubly salient structure and integrated permanent magnets within the stator is presented in this dissertation. The machine demonstrates high power density (up to 50 kW/L) with capabilities such as a rated torque of 95 Nm at 12,500 rpm and a maximum speed of 37,500 rpm. An analytical model using lumped parameter magnetic equivalent circuits (LPMEC) is developed, examining spatial harmonics and validating results through finite element analysis. A high-fidelity model-based motor drive system employs a field-oriented control approach and introduces a complex vector current (CVC) regulation strategy, enhancing stability compared to classical methods. Comparative analyses highlight the robustness of CVC regulation. Experimental tests have been conducted to validate the analytical outcomes and proposed control methodologies employing an open frame laboratory prototype (OFLP) of the proposed machine and SiC based traction inverter.

In higher education institutions, the Senior International Officer (SIO), described as an administrator who manages overall internationalization activities, has been identified as the most important catalyst for campus internationalization. Institutional context, including structural, cultural, and environmental aspects, can be highly influential in determining the extent to which internationalization, led and facilitated by the SIO, is realized. This basic qualitative study examines the intersection of leadership and institutional context as mediators of the internationalization process, a perspective which is lacking in the current literature on the SIO role. To better understand the perspectives of SIOs on how organizational context and culture shape their roles as implementers of comprehensive internationalization, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 participants currently working in an SIO role at a university receiving a national award for internationalization. Strategic planning documents serve as a secondary data source. A qualitative thematic analysis of the interview and documentary data was performed using an inductive coding process. Findings suggest that the roles of strategist, networker, and advocate are key to the SIO’s successful navigation of institutional context. Furthermore, the specifics of each institution’s distinctive context may be more influential for the SIO’s role than any commonalities between institutions of the same type, as defined by size, funding model, or Carnegie classification. Implications for professional practice include a renewed focus for SIOs on the strategic alignment of internationalization with the institutional mission, the development of sustainable cross-campus networks to raise visibility and manage perceptions, and a willingness to experiment as a way of demonstrating value to the wider campus community.

Novice programmers are known for holding incomplete and inconsistent mental models. A mental model stores knowledge that reflects a person's belief system, helps determine actions, and facilitates learning. Mental model correctness and consistency are two criteria that make a mental model useful. Though the literature on mental models is rich with more than two decades of research, novice programmers' mental model is understudied in the CS education research community. Guided by the mental model theories from psychology and cognitive science, I investigated novice programmers' mental models of arrays before and after CS1 course instruction. Furthermore, I explored the gap that might exist between students with varying levels of prior programming experience. To that end, by following the theories of mental models, I defined the mental models for Java arrays, including assertions of the array's parts and state changes. I further decomposed the array's parts and state changes into four sub-components each (parts: name, index, type, elements}; state changes: declaration, instantiation, assigning literals, assignment). To elicit the mental model assertions of novice programmers from large CS1 classrooms, I adopted a multiple choice-based questionnaire approach (the Mental Model Test) covering each array's component. I collected responses from novice programmers as they entered a CS1 course and transitioned into a CS2 course. I analyzed participants' mental model assertions based on their correctness and consistency.

The results show that participants' mental model correctness and consistency improved after formal classroom instruction. Moreover, even though improved, I found evidence that the mental model components of the array's state changes were less accurate and consistent than the parts. In addition, participants with prior programming experience had significantly lower mental model correctness and consistency than those with prior programming experience before classroom instruction on arrays. The mental model test highlighted several novice programmers' misconceptions. Over half of our participants held at least one misconception before and after learning arrays in classrooms. Novice programmers mostly held misconceptions about the arrays’ declarations (state change) as incoming CS1 students and when transitioning into CS2. After classroom instruction, the number of students holding misconceptions about the parts components decreased. However, for the state changes components, in most cases, the number of students holding misconceptions remained almost the same even after classroom instruction. I close my dissertation by summarizing the overall findings while investigating novice programmers' mental models in their different learning trajectories. Lastly, I discuss the implications of my research in designing instructional materials for CS educators on possible solutions to mitigate the mental model gap of novice programmers.

Echinoderms are highly regenerative animals that share a common ancestor with chordates, including humans. While the two phyla share a common ancestor, echinoderms defeat humans when it comes to regeneration. Regeneration is the replacement of damaged cells or regrowth of damaged tissues or organs naturally. Despite the significant differences in the body plan of echinoderms and humans, the similarities in their genome structure, the genes these two groups share, the phylogenetic relationship they have, and the simplicity of experimentation make echinoderms a valuable group to study regeneration. We expect that understanding tissue regeneration in echinoderms can set a stage for improved treatments and provide insights for developing therapeutic approaches to treat human injuries in the future.

Even within such a highly regenerative phylum as echinoderms, some species regenerate more readily than others. Holothurians, commonly known as sea cucumbers, occupy a special place in this regard, as they can fully and rapidly regenerate their body parts and major organs, including: the viscera, central nervous system, body wall, and muscles. However, the available genomic resources are very limited to implement holothuroids as animal models to study regeneration. Moreover, the available genomic resources do not represent diversity within the phylum. Hence, to fill this gap, I have updated an easy-to-use web-based application, EchinoDB, a database resource that includes the genomic and transcriptomic data on 42 unique echinoderm species, spanning the deepest divergences within the five extant classes of the phylum in addition to the 2 new major datasets: the RNA-Seq data of the brittle star Ophioderma brevispinum and the high-quality genomic assembly data of the green sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus.

Among sea cucumbers, the vast majority of molecular studies have been done on a single species, Holothuria glaberrima which do not represent the diversity of various regenerative events, including: regeneration of the gut luminal epithelium (mesodermal to endodermal) and regeneration of the pharyngeal bulb. However, other sea cucumber species, especially, those of the order Dendrochirotida are capable of such exceptional regeneration events. Therefore, I sequenced and annotated the draft genome of a dendrochirotid Sclerodactyla briareus to gain a deeper understanding of the regulatory molecular mechanisms controlling regeneration and genomic aspects behind the diversity of regeneration, seen in echinoderms.

To illustrate the practical utility of the dendrochirotid genome for regeneration studies, key components of the Notch and Wnt signaling pathways were selected and identified in the genome of hairy sea cucumber S. briareus. This is a biologically relevant example as these pathways are crucial for tissue regeneration in echinoderms. They are highly conserved across all multi-cellular animals and are known to coordinate many cellular events, including: cell proliferation, de-differentiation, cell division, and apoptosis. Therefore, I aimed to retrieve 29 selected genes of the Notch pathway and 25 selected genes of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Except for Mesp2 (a Notch pathway gene), all other genes were identified in the newly assembled draft genome of S. briareus.

I also studied S. briareus for primordial host-viral interactions and to learn about the evolution of their immune system by looking at the recombination activating genes (RAG) in relation to Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and other echinoderms. The objective was to discover and characterize novel viral sequences within S. briareus alongside the evolution of immune genes (RAG-Like) in marine environment. However, because of the gaps in the assembly, I was unable to find any evidence of viral markers in the genome of S. briareus. The paucity of full-length contigs in the genome assembly also resulted into only 3 protein sequences that may potentially share a sequence homology with RAG1-Like gene, but further investigation is needed. The lack of results require improvements in the genome assembly and the availability of increased data for RAG-Like genes on echinoderms. Nevertheless, this work is still useful for regeneration studies on echinoderms.

With the recent increase in the number of available options for families to consider when selecting a school, diverse publicly funded public schools are now competing for both students and funding. This study intended to contribute to the available research on the changes at inner-city schools during increased school choice options. The purpose of this single case study was to gain additional insights into changes in student demographics, academic achievement, and perceptions of an inner-city high school during an era of increased school choice from 2011-2023. This single case study included both qualitative and quantitative data sources. The researcher’s data for this study involved semi-structured, one-on-one interviews with five participants and publicly available data from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction and the North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions survey. The researcher also reviewed school yearbooks for the 2011-2023 school years to further develop an understanding of the school changes during the study period. Findings indicate that there has been a decline in enrollment over the past 13 school years, with an increase in the percentage of students of color attending the school. Findings also indicate a decline in the school's academic profile, with only a small improvement over the last two years. Implications included the need for the local school district to review the number of district-supported school choice options, the potential impact of choice programs on non-choice schools, the need to recruit and retain capable leadership, and evaluating the out-of-district application process.

This dissertation explores the perception of social skills in structured virtual interviews, with a focus on how verbal, nonverbal, and vocal signals influence Social Skills Perception (SSP). The study explores the impact of specific behaviors on observers' perceptions of social skills and why particular behaviors are associated with low social skills perception scores. A central finding is the "just right" effect, which reveals that both excessive and insufficient displays of certain behaviors can negatively affect SSP, emphasizing the importance of balanced social skills demonstration in structured interviews. The findings contribute to social skills literature by building on the Heggestad et al. (2023) Social Skills Framework and highlight the complex dynamics of SSP in professional settings, particularly in structured interviews. This study suggests that such interviews might not fully capture exceptional social skills, offering insights into interview practices and evaluating social competencies in the workplace. Future research is encouraged to explore SSP across various contexts and cultures to deepen our understanding of these phenomena.

Superintendent turnover in the state of North Carolina is a concern. Through a qualitative multiple case study, the researcher’s goal in conducting this study was to explore the lived experiences of eight first-year superintendents in North Carolina. Using Hambrick and Fukutomi’s (1991) concept of the seasons of a chief executive officer’s tenure, this study explored participants’ pathways to the superintendency and professional and personal challenges while in the role. Additionally, this study sought further understanding of participants’ priorities, successes, and mistakes, along with advice they had for aspiring superintendents. Eight semi-structured interviews were used to gather data for this study. To identify themes from the eight interviews, data were analyzed using a constant comparison analysis (Marshall & Rossman, 2006). The findings of the study align with existing literature about the experiences of superintendents. Common themes from the eight participants illuminated the importance of a productive partnership with the board of education, professional relationships with stakeholders, and the need for professional networking. Additionally, participants commonly felt a sense of professional isolation and struggled to maintain work-life balance. Implications and recommendations included the need to ensure aspiring superintendents closely consider the alignment between their goals and dispositions and those of the board for which they may work. Additionally, networking and long-range planning were emphasized along with proactive measures to address the social and emotional needs of those serving in highly demanding superintendent positions.

The Graduate School and the Graduate Admissions office in the Reese Building, Fifth Floor, is temporarily closed to allow contractors to complete some needed work in the space safely.

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Thesis and Dissertation Defenses

Submitting a defense announcement.

To submit a graduate thesis or dissertation defense, please

The dissertation/thesis defense must be open to the public and announced two weeks prior to the date of the defense.

College Policy on Dissertation/Thesis Defenses

Upcoming Defenses

2024 –  2023 – 2022 – 2021 – 2020 – 2019 – 2018 – 2017 – 2016 – 2015 – 2014 – 2013 – 2012

Feb 22 2024

  • CS Defense - Mohammed Al Kinoon

Feb 23 2024

  • CS Defense - Mohammed Alqadhi

Feb 27 2024

  • CS Defense - Mnassar Alyami
  • ECE Defense - Srinivas Varma Pericherla
  • ECE Defense - Sahin Gullu
  • ECE Defense - Reza Rezaii

Mar 15 2024

  • CS Defense - Ardhi Wiratama Baskara Yudha

Mar 27 2024

  • MAE Defense - Jacklyn Higgs

dissertation defense announcement

  • One official transcript (in a sealed envelope) from each college/university attended.
  • A Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering or another closely related engineering degree.
  • Résumé.
  • Statement of educational, research, and professional career objectives.
  • Three letters of recommendation.
  • Applicants applying to this program who have attended a college/university outside the United States must provide a course-by-course credential evaluation with GPA calculation. Credential evaluations are accepted from World Education Services (WES) or Josef Silny and Associates, Inc. only.

For international students interested in  UCF Global Pathway Program  (immersive English-language learning), please contact  Dr. Ali P. Gordon  for guidance.

  • Bachelor’s Degree in Industrial Engineering or a closely related field with GPA of 3.0 or greater
  • Mathematics through Calculus II (MAC 2312 or equivalent)
  • An undergraduate course in engineering probability and statistics
  • Familiarity with at least one programming language (such as Python, C, C++, Visual BASIC, Java, etc.)
  • Official transcripts
  • Two letters of recommendations
  • Goal Statement

Admission is open to those with a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution recognized by UCF. An application to the graduate certificate program and official transcripts must be submitted. Applicants must apply online. All requested materials must be submitted by the established deadline. Admission to the program is competitive on a space-available basis. Final admission is based on evaluation of the applicant's abilities, past performance and the applicant's potential for completing the certificate. For international students interested in  UCF Global Pathway Program  (immersive English-language learning), please contact  Dr. Ali P. Gordon  for guidance.

  • Applications are accepted for the fall and spring terms only.
  • In addition, applicants to this certificate must provide: Applicants applying to this program who have attended a college/university outside the United States must provide a course-by-course credential evaluation with GPA calculation. Credential evaluations are accepted from World Education Services (WES) or Josef Silny and Associates, Inc only.
  • Applicants applying to this program who have attended a college/university outside the United States must provide a course-by-course credential evaluation with GPA calculation.
  • Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering or closely related discipline with a minimum GPA 3.0
  • The GRE/GMAT is not required
  • A goal statement. This is your opportunity to outline in 500 words why you wish to join the program, what you think you will contribute to the program, and how you feel the program will enhance you both personally and professionally in the future.
  • Updated résumé.
  • Applicants applying to this program who have attended a college/university outside the United States must provide a course-by-course credential evaluation with GPA calculation. Credential evaluations are accepted from World Education Services (WES) or Josef Silny and Associates, Inc. only.
  • A computer-based TOEFL score of 220 or 80 on the internet-based TOEFL is required if an applicant is from a country where English is not the official language, or if an applicant’s degree is not from an accredited U.S. institution, or if an applicant did not earn a degree in a country where English is the official language or a university where English is the official language of instruction. Although we prefer the TOEFL, we will accept IELTS scores of 6.5.
  • The GRE is not required for admission to this program.
  • Resume or Curriculum Vita
  • The goal statement should discuss all relevant professional background and any previous research and/or teaching experience. The statement should explain the motivation behind the pursuit of an MSSE. Future educational and career goals after the completion of the applicant’s master study should be discussed.
  • If the applicant is interested in completing a Master thesis, then the applicant must clearly describe the particular area of research interest. The applicant should identify at least one UCF faculty member who shares a similar research focus and is believed to be best suited to serve as a potential thesis advisor. 
  • The goal statement should between 500 and 1,000 words.
  • The letters of recommendation should be from faculty members, university administrators, and employers with a supervisory role of the applicant. The letters, which must be current to the application and must not be for another degree program, should address the educational and career goals of the applicant. The letter writers should also know the applicant well enough to discuss the applicant’s capacity to perform, excel and succeed in a graduate program. Letters for Master’s thesis students must discuss the applicant’s ability to perform graduate-level research.
  • Applicants applying to this program who have attended a college/university outside the United States must provide a course-by-course credential evaluation with GPA calculation. Credential evaluations are accepted from World Education Services (WES) or Josef Silny and Associates, Inc. only.
  • 2 Letters of recommendation

An undergraduate degree in Computer Science, Statistics, Information Technology, or Computer Engineering is desirable but not required. Applicants without a strong undergraduate background in Computer Science and Statistics must demonstrate an understanding of the material covered in upper-division undergraduate courses listed under the Articulation Section of the Curriculum Information. Applicants may choose to demonstrate their knowledge of these courses by taking these courses as non-degree seeking and scoring “B” or better in all of them.

  • A bachelor’s degree in Biomedical, Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering, or a closely related discipline. 
  • Applicants applying to this program who have attended a college/university outside the United States must provide a course-by-course credential evaluation with GPA calculation. Credential evaluations are accepted from World Education Services (WES) or Josef Silny and Associates, Inc. only.
  • Bachelor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering or closely related discipline.
  • Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering or closely related discipline.
  • Applicants applying to this program who have attended a college/university outside the United States must provide a course-by-course credential evaluation with GPA calculation. Credential evaluations are accepted from World Education Services (WES) or Josef Silny and Associates, Inc. only
  • Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in Biomedical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering or closely related discipline.
  • Official, competitive GRE score taken within the last five years.
  • A written statement of experience and research, areas of current and future potential research interests, and future career goals.

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The Graduate College » Current Students » Graduation » Dissertation Defenses

Upcoming Dissertation Defenses

UC doctoral students participate in a public defense of their dissertations. Students announce their dissertation by entering information through the Graduation Checklist application.

Defense Announcements

''Falling Behind: The Influence of Criminal Justice Contact on Financial Well-Being''

''Development of innate and adaptive immune responses to pneumonia in the newborn lung is uniquely programmed by gut microbiota''

''The Potential for Victimization of Underage Female Instagram Influencers: An Examination Using Routine Activities Theory''

'' From Healthy to Epileptic Brain: Molecular Contributors to Epileptogenesis''

'' Validation of Convective Wave-Based Reduced Order Model of Combustion Instabilities in a Lean Premixed Bluff Body Combustor''

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MS Thesis and PhD Dissertation Final Defense Announcements

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Part of the submission must include your Abstract in PDF form. Submissions will be reviewed by Graduate Studies and you will receive a notification once approved. If changes are needed, you will be notified to do so via email.

IF YOUR THESIS OR DISSERTATION IS TO BE SEQUESTERED/EMBARGOED , DO NOT SUBMIT AN ABSTRACT BUT JUST INCLUDE "SEQUESTERED/EMBARGOED" INSTEAD OF AN ABSTRACT. ANYONE WHO WILL THEN ATTEND YOUR DEFENSE MUST SIGN THE NON-DISCLOSURE AGREEMENT FORM AVAILABLE AT THIS LINK . DOWNLOAD THE FORM AND GIVE IT TO YOUR MAIN ADVISOR BEFORE THE DEFENSE.

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Upcoming Announcements

This list of scheduled Ph.D. dissertation defenses is posted so that faculty and others may attend the defense. If you wish to attend, please contact the committee chair in advance as a courtesy. 

Tuesday, February 20, 2024, 2:00 p.m. IU School of Medicine Medical Neuroscience Jonathan Patrick Alessi Brain responses to sugar: Implications for alcohol use disorder and obesity NB 101 & Virtual Chair: Karmen Yoder, Ph.D., 317-963-7507

Wednesday, February 28, 2024, 1:00 p.m. IU School of Medicine Pharmacology Tinslee Yale Dilday Characterization of a novel hunk inhibitor in HER2+ breast cancer R3 C203 Chair: Elizabeth Yeh, Ph.D., 317-274-7828

Wednesday, February 28, 2024, 3:00 p.m. IU School of Nursing Nursing Science Mandy Lynn Dees Nurse to family communication in intensive care units NU-400-B Chair: Janet Carpenter, Ph.D., 317-278-6093

Tuesday, March 5, 2024, 2:30 p.m. IU School of Public Health Health Policy & Management Gary Maurice Brumitt Home health agencies & home health care: An examination of financial performance, quality, and micro-costing RG 6040 Chair: Joshua Vest, Ph.D., 317-278-4618

Wednesday, March 6, 2024, 1:00 p.m. IU School of Medicine Pharmacology Nicole Ramos Solis Hunk as an immune regulator of triple negative breast cancer R3 C203 Chair: Elizabeth Yeh, Ph.D., 317-274-7828

Thursday, March 7, 2024, 2:00 p.m. IU School of Medicine Medical & Molecular Genetics Sarah Sterling Burns The role of inflammatory signaling pathways in TET2-deficient hematological malignancies R3 C203 Chair: Reuben Kapur, Ph.D., 317-274-4658

Monday March 11, 2024, 3:30 p.m. IU School of Medicine Medical & Molecular Genetics John Robert Wells Identifying novel causes of X-linked heterotaxy R3 C303/305 Chair: Stephanie M. Ware, Ph.D., 317-274-8938

Monday, March 18, 2024, 12:30 p.m. IU School of Medicine Medical Neuroscience Henika Sanjaybhai Patel Contributions of the presynaptic protein bassoon to tau pathogenesis and neurodegeneration NB 101 Chair: Adrian Oblak, Ph.D., 317-274-0107

Monday March 25, 2024, 9:00 a.m. IU School of Medicine Microbiology & Immunology Jorge Jose Canas Kouaifati Innate immune roles of a-Defensin 1-3 in neutralizing uropathogenic Escherichia coli R3 203 Chair: David S. Hains, Ph.D., 317-944-2563

Monday, March 25, 2024, 12:00 p.m. IU School of Liberal Arts American Studies Nicole Christina Carey Solidarities: Intersectional: A design approach to building collective power in racialized organizations CA 316 Chair: Carly Schall, Ph.D., 615-983-0378

Monday March 25, 2024, 1:00 p.m. IU School of Liberal Arts American Studies Brigitte Rene Swartwood Bringing clinical organizational ethics into practice CA 438 Chair: Emily Beckman, Ph.D., 317-274-4755

Monday, March 25, 2024, 2:30 p.m. IU School of Medicine Medical & Molecular Genetics Srimmitha Balachandar Deciphering the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension R3 303/305 Chair: Micheala A Aldred, Ph.D., 317-278-7716

Wednesday, March 27, 2024, 1:00 p.m. IU School of Public Health Epidemiology Benjamin Michael Helm Investigating cardiac class, extracardiac anomalies, and dysmorphology patterns predictive of mendelian genetic disorders in pediatric congenital heart disease RG 6040 Chair: Jennifer Wessel, Ph.D., 317-278-3070

Wednesday, April 3, 2024, 2:00 p.m. IU School of Philanthropy Philanthropic Studies Anita Jean Anglade Decolonizing benevolence: Can faith leaders move the mark toward equity to create an alternative to the white savior complex? 3011 University Hall Co-Chairs: Katherine Badertscher, Ph.D., 317-278-8950; Sara Konrath, Ph.D., 317-278-8971

Wednesday, May 8, 2024, 3:30 p.m. IU School of Medicine Medical & Molecular Genetics Jeffrey Peter Solzak Harnessing compensatory pathways and acquired resistance in treating triple negative breast cancer EH 304 Chair: Xiongbin Lu, Ph.D., 317-274-4398

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dissertation defense announcement

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  • Academic Requirements

Schedule your defense

One of the last steps to obtaining your doctoral degree is to defend your dissertation. Once you have finalized your dissertation, you must schedule and announce your defense.

First, arrange a mutually agreeable time with your committee. Set up the oral exam at least 30 days prior to when you wish to defend. Provide all members of your committee with a complete copy of your dissertation at least 30 days before the defense so they will have sufficient time to read and criticize your work.

Learn more about deadlines

Announce your defense

Once the date of your defense has been established, you should complete the Ph.D. Defense Announcement Submission through OneStart. The announcement edoc must reach the Indiana University Graduate School Bloomington (UGSB) at least 30 days before the date of your defense. The UGSB begins counting the 30 days from the date your edoc is received by our office. We recommend that you submit the edoc at least 40 days before your defense date to allow time for the edoc to route for approval through your academic department.

The summary should be informative and contain a brief statement of the principal results and conclusions. Unlike the abstract, which is intended for specialists in the field, an attempt should be made in the summary to communicate the findings in language and style that can be understood by the University community at large. The summary should be no less than 150 and no more than 300 words in length.

Submit your announcement on One.IU

Once announced, the defense date cannot be changed without the approval of the dean of the UGSB.

In-person defenses are the standard exam format at IUB. However, candidates and research committees may elect to conduct defenses online using tools such as Zoom and Skype without prior UGSB approval

After submitting your Ph.D. Defense Announcement Submission edoc, track your document to ensure timely approval. Retain the email confirmation containing your document ID.

Upcoming defenses

This list of scheduled Ph.D. dissertation defenses is distributed so that members of the university community and the public may attend the defense. If you wish to attend the defense, please contact the committee chair in advance as a courtesy. If you are a faculty member and wish to see the full defense announcement, please call the UGSB at 812-855-8853.

KELLEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, GRADUATE DIVISION

Monday, April 22, 2024, 1:00 pm Business Kim, Kyu Ree To Profit or To Assist? How the Interplay Between Product Recommendations and Relative Prices Impact Consumers' Inferences and Choice Hodge Hall Marketing Department Conference Room Chair: Prof. Rom Schrift, (812-856-1081)

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, GRADUATE DIVISION

Tuesday, February 20, 2024, 1:00 pm Biochemistry Dudek, David THE CRITICAL BINDING PARTNER, CDC50A, CONTRIBUTES TO THE PHOSPHOLIPID SPECIFICITY AND FLIPPASE ACTIVITY OF THE MURINE P4-TYPE ATPASE, ATP8A1 Simon Hall 001 Chair: Prof. David Daleke, (812-855-6902)

Friday, February 23, 2024, 12:30 pm Biochemistry Chuang, Ying-Chih Adenine cross-feeding in a synthetic bacterial community Simon Hall 001 Chair: Prof. James McKinlay, (812-855-0359)

Wednesday, February 28, 2024, 12:00 pm Spanish Escalante Vergara, Maria Where did the Liquids go? Acoustic Analysis of Compensatory Lengthening through Liquid Loss in Cartagena, Colombia. Remote Defense: Contact Chair for Details Chair: Prof. Manuel Díaz-Campos, (812-856-5462)

Thursday, February 29, 2024, 9:00 am Chinese Cherici, Alessia ALTERNATIVE REALITIES: Investigating Comprehension and Production of Counterfactuals by L1-English Learners of Chinese Remote Defense: Contact Chair for Details Chair: Prof. Chien-Jer Lin / Prof. David Stringer, (812-606-9501 / 812-269-1085)

Friday, March 01, 2024, 2:00 pm History Raber, Richard 'IN THE EYES OF THE NEW GOVERNMENT, WE ARE COVERED IN MUD': CULTURAL MEMORY, GENERATIONAL CONFLICT, AND THE IMPRINT OF MILITARIZATION ON TWO FORMER MILITARY COMMUNITIES Remote Defense: Contact Chair for Details Chair: Prof. Alex Lichtenstein, (812-855-7504)

Monday, March 04, 2024, 3:00 pm Anthropology Peterson, Ryan Lake Superior’s Native Copper Industry: Archaic Copper Production Systems and Values in the Northern Lake Superior Basin Student Building 159 Chair: Prof. April Sievert, (812-320-0154)

Wednesday, March 20, 2024, 12:00 pm Linguistics Jagiella, Francis Brazilian Portuguese Rhotic Variation and Deletion in Salvador and São Paulo Indiana Memorial Union Distinguished Alumni Room Chair: Prof. Kenneth de Jong, (812-855-6456)

Wednesday, March 27, 2024, 2:00 pm Evolution, Ecology, & Behavior Talbott, Katherine Impacts of the avian malaria parasite Plasmodium on songbird reproductive physiology and behavior Simon Hall 001 Chair: Prof. Ellen Ketterson, (812-855-6837)

Friday, March 29, 2024, 2:00 pm History Andrei, George Our Struggle for Existence: Forestry, Rural Citizenship, and Statebuilding in Modern Romania Ballantine Hall Conference Room, BH901 Chair: Prof. Maria Bucur, (812-855-1993)

Friday, March 29, 2024, 2:00 pm Neuroscience / Human Performance Zuidema, Taylor Tackling the Neurological Implications: Exploring Repetitive Head Impacts in Young Football Athletes Through Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy School of Public Health IU Bloomington – room PH C100 Chair: Prof. Keisuke Kawata / Prof. David Koceja, (812-855-5244 / 812-855-7302)

Monday, April 01, 2024, 11:30 am Economics Knies, Austin Information Frictions in Health Care and Transportation Wylie Hall Room 225 Chair: Prof. Emerson Melo, (812-855-9051)

Friday, April 05, 2024, 12:00 pm Sociology Finlay, Brandon Hustle in Higher Ed., or the Hustle of Higher Ed.? The Formerly Incarcerated In Higher Education Remote Defense: Contact Chair for Details Chair: Prof. Jessica Calarco / Prof. Ethan Michelson, (608-262-2921 / 812-856-1521)

Thursday, April 18, 2024, 1:30 pm Gender Studies Kizer, James "Doing It" Differently? Narrating and Navigating Autistic Sexual Desire Lindley Hall 201H Chair: Prof. Cynthia Wu, (812-855-0101)

Friday, April 19, 2024, 1:00 pm Gender Studies Hoard-Jackson, Teresa Fallopian Feminism: A Black Queer Feminist Methodological Intervention on Reproductive Technoscience Lindley Hall 201H Chair: Prof. Laura Foster, (812-855-0101)

Wednesday, April 24, 2024, 2:00 pm Biochemistry Bower, James INVESTIGATION OF NEUROTENSIN RECEPTOR 1 BIOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES IN MICELLE MEMBRANE MIMETICS Remote Defense: Contact Chair for Details Chair: Prof. Marc Morais / Prof. Joshua Ziarek, (812-855-2706 / 617-416-1448)

Friday, May 10, 2024, 10:00 am Microbiology Doucette, Kaitlin RNA SECONDARY STRUCTURES IN THE ROTAVIRUS GENOME PROMOTE EFFICIENT VIRAL REPLICATION Simon Hall #001 Chair: Prof. John Patton, (812-855-5211)

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, GRADUATE DIVISION

Monday, February 26, 2024, 1:00 pm Higher Education Broderick, Cynthia The Origination and Utilization of Titled Professorships at Indiana University, 1890s-1970s: A Historical Study Bryan Hall, 106 Chair: Prof. Andrea Walton, (812-856-8358)

Tuesday, March 05, 2024, 12:30 pm Instructional Systems Technology Abramenka, Uladzimir TEACHING PRESENCE AND SOCIAL PRESENCE IN AN ONLINE COURSE: A CASE STUDY ON THE DEAF STUDENT PERSPECTIVE Remote Defense: Contact Chair for Details Chair: Prof. Thomas Brush, (812-856-8458)

Wednesday, March 06, 2024, 12:00 pm Literacy, Culture, & Language Education Bamanger, Ebrahim HIGH-LEVERAGE TEACHING PRACTICES FOR ORAL COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE AS VIEWED BY FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNERS AND INSTRUCTORS Wright Education Bldg 4204 Chair: Prof. Serafin Coronel-Molina, (812-822-1087)

Wednesday, March 20, 2024, 1:15 pm Counseling Psychology Purnell, DeJon THE REFEREE PERSPECTIVE: AN EXPLORATION OF THE REFEREE EXPERIENCE AT THE ELITE LEVEL OF COMPETITION Remote Defense: Contact Chair for Details Chair: Prof. Jesse Steinfeldt, (812-856-8331)

SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS, COMPUTING, AND ENGINEERING, GRADUATE DIVISION

Tuesday, March 19, 2024, 9:30 am Intelligent Systems Engineering Zhang, Chengming Hardware-Software Co-design of Efficient and Scalable Machine Learning Remote Defense: Contact Chair for Details Chair: Prof. Dingwen Tao, (951-236-2342)

Friday, March 22, 2024, 10:00 am Intelligent Systems Engineering Sivaraman, Aswin Resource-Efficient Model Adaptation Methods for Personalized Speech Enhancement Systems Remote Defense: Contact Chair for Details Chair: Prof. Minje Kim, (812-856-3675)

Friday, March 29, 2024, 11:00 pm Intelligent Systems Engineering Tian, Jiannan GPU-Accelerated Data Reduction for Scientific Data Toward Exascale Computing Remote Defense: Contact Chair for Details Chair: Prof. Dingwen Tao, (812-855-2822)

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Friday, March 29, 2024, 2:00 pm Human Performance / Neuroscience Zuidema, Taylor Tackling the Neurological Implications: Exploring Repetitive Head Impacts in Young Football Athletes Through Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy School of Public Health IU Bloomington – room PH C100 Chair: Prof. Keisuke Kawata / Prof. David Koceja, (812-855-5244 / 812-855-7302)

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The Graduate School

Defense announcements.

The final defense of the dissertation is conducted by an examination committee recommended by the graduate faculty advisor and approved by the dean of The Graduate School. All final oral examinations are open to members of the graduate faculty. Below is the published list of upcoming or recent dissertation defenses.

To see the location and abstract of a defense candidate, please click on their named event and click ‘more details’.

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Announcements

February 29: phd candidate jon gilgoff dissertation defense 2/29 2pm.

PhD Candidate Jon Gilgoff

The PhD program is pleased to announce Jon Gilgoff will defend his Dissertation entitled " Comprehensive U.S. Federal Boys’ and Men’s Health Policy: Examining Barriers and Strategies Through a Mixed Methods Policy Delphi".  Jon's study is chaired by Dr. Fernando Wagner.

If you wish to attend the presentation portion of the defense on Thursday, February 29th at 2pm, please contact Jen Canapp at [email protected]

To read more about the study, please visit Announcement of Doctoral Dissertation Defense

Recent Announcements

University of South Florida

College of Education

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Graduate support office, dissertation announcements, after the doctoral dissertation committee has determined that the final draft of the dissertation is suitable for presentation; the committee will request the scheduling and announcement of the dissertation defense (also called final oral examination or oral defense). .

A copy of the announcement should be sent to the USF Office of Graduate Studies, preferably two weeks in advance of the defense date. The announcement must also be posted in a public forum for a minimum of twenty-four hours to comply with statute requirements for a public meeting. Below is a list of announcements for the current semester's Dissertation Proposals and Final Defense Sessions in the College of Education. 

NOTE:  All Defenses are being held virtually at this time.  Links to the virtual defenses are included in the individual defense announcments. 

Announcements are sorted by the date of the defense.

Spring 2024 Doctoral Dissertation Proposals and Final Defense Sessions

January 2024

01-19-2024 K Geren - Proposal

01-24-2024 L Alnomei - Proposal

February 2024

02-06-2024 M Lewis - Proposal

02-08-2024 M MItchell - Proposal

02-15-2024 H Van Dyke - Final

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Information For

Theses & Dissertations

The graduate thesis or dissertation is a key component of a research based graduate degree. This page summarizes some important steps in the process, however the Office of Graduate Studies Guidelines for Preparing Theses and Dissertations (PDF) is the official authority on all aspects of the undertaking. 

Timeline of Thesis/Dissertation Completion*

*Students are encouraged to submit their work earlier, as these dates reflect final deadlines for submission. Program or department guidelines supersede these dates if they require earlier deadlines than those published in the Office of Graduate Studies Guidelines for Preparing Theses and Dissertations (PDF).

Formation of Committee 

Your thesis or dissertation chairperson will be responsible for guiding you through the process. Once you have identified this individual, then in consultation with them you should identify two or more (depending on program requirements) additional faculty members who will add value to the development of the research and be part of the group evaluating it when you are ready to defend your research.  

Forms for the establishment of your thesis/dissertation committee need to be completed in DocuSign . 

Forms for the establishment of your thesis/dissertation committee.

Proposal and initiation of scholarship .

The student is to maintain ongoing contact with the thesis/dissertation chairperson and the committee members during the development of the proposal and to abide by the academic program or department guidelines for its content and scope. Some programs and departments require a formal oral defense of a thesis proposal, though this is not a requirement of the Office of Graduate Studies . Doctoral dissertation proposals require a formal oral defense. Approval of the thesis or dissertation proposal by the chairperson and committee members is necessary for the student to proceed with the thesis or dissertation research. The student is to confer with and receive approval from the chairperson and the committee members for a proposed timeframe for completing the thesis or dissertation. The Dean of Graduate Studies does not need to approve the thesis or dissertation proposal. 

The student must seek and obtain written approval from the Towson University Institutional Review Board (IRB) for the Protection of Human Subjects prior to conducting research that involves the use of human subjects. Students must seek and obtain approval from the Towson University Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) prior to conducting research that involves the use of animals. Students can contact the Office of Sponsored Programs and Research for assistance at 410-704‐2236 or at ospr AT_TOWSON .

Defense and Graduation 

Students are to abide by all deadlines established by the Office of Graduate Studies for review and submission of the final thesis/dissertation and by the Registrar’s Office for formal submission of an intention to graduate. Students are to abide by department and program deadlines for review and submission of the thesis/dissertation, if these deadlines are earlier than those stated by the Office of Graduate Studies.  

Once it is approved by the committee chairperson, the student is to distribute the final draft of the thesis or dissertation to the committee members for review. At the time of distribution, the student is to meet with the committee chairperson to establish a date and time for the oral defense of the thesis/dissertation. The oral defense should occur at least four weeks before the end of the academic term. The student may announce the date and time of the defense to the university community at least one week prior to the event. The administrative assistant to the student’s program or college can assist in posting defense announcements. Thesis and dissertation defenses are open to all members of the Towson University academic community, and to guests invited by the student. Upon successful completion of your thesis/dissertation defense and making all corrections required by your committee you should submit your thesis to the Office of Graduate Studies and circulate the appropriate final thesis approval form to your committee members for signature. 

Doctoral students should complete the doctoral student info form to ensure correct bio information is included in the commencement program. 

Forms for final approval of your thesis/dissertation.

Submission to graduate studies .

The student is to submit the final approved thesis/dissertation, signed approval form, and the Internet release page in electronic form to the Office of Graduate Studies at gradformat AT_TOWSON at least 10 working days prior to the official end of the term in which the student intends to graduate.

The electronic copy of the thesis/dissertation is to be in a version compatible with Microsoft Word; the electronic copy should not be a PDF at this time. The Office of Graduate Studies evaluates an electronic copy of thesis/dissertation, after it has been approved by the committee, to ensure compliance with the procedural and formatting requirements stipulated in this manual. Theses or dissertations that do not follow the guidelines will need to be corrected by the student before receiving final approval from the Office of Graduate Studies.

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Watch this ed.d. dissertation defense via zoom.

February 19, 2024

Azman Sabet, candidate for the degree of Doctor of Education: Administrative Leadership, will defend their dissertation, “Lived Experience of At-Risk Accelerated Second-Degree (ASD) Nursing Students,” at 3 p.m. Tuesday, March 5, via Zoom. The committee is composed of John R. Goss, III, Ph.D. (chair); Andra Hanlon, Ph.D., ARNP, CPNP; Sharron E. Guillett, Ph.D.; and Anne Schempp, Ed.D., PA-C. Members of the community are invited to attend this defense via Zoom . Questions? Contact Dr. Goss at [email protected] .

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Dissertation defense announcement, Junli Zhao, Finance

Participate.

HEC PhD Candidate Junli  Zhao, Finance

We are happy to announce PhD Candidate Junli Zhao's dissertation defense on August 12, 4.00pm.

Specialization:  Finance

Subject:  Title : Essays on intermediation in financial markets 

Advisor:  Jean-Edouard Colliard, Associate Professor, HEC Paris

Abstract:  The thesis contains three essays. In the first essay, I investigate whether financial experts benefit from more machine-readable data in information production in asset management. Exploiting an exogenous regulatory shock that makes corporate filings more machine-readable, I find that institutions with more financial experts have larger performance improvement than institutions with fewer financial experts, suggesting financial experts benefiting from more machine-readable data. This result helps evaluate the likelihood of algorithms replacing high-skilled financial practitioners. In the second essay, I study the rationale and implications of the recent MiFID II regulation in Europe that made delegated asset managers’ spending on sell-side analyst research more transparent to their clients. We show that transparency decreases the use of sell-side research but stimulates more buy-side research activities, which is consistent with empirical findings. Our model has additional predictions on managers’ performance, liquidity, and social welfare. In the third essay, I study brokers in private placement markets, who intermediate about 20% of capital raised by non-financial firms in this market. I find that projects intermediated by brokers with better reputations are more likely to be fully funded. Contrary to existing theories on underwriters, projects sold through brokers are less likely to be fully funded on average and most issuers prefer direct selling. A model that features both search frictions and asymmetric information suggests that these non-regularities may be due to the fact that the certification role of brokers is limited by competition between intermediated selling and direct selling. The model also explains some non-intuitive patterns of commission fees in the data. These results contribute to a better understanding of private placement markets and intermediaries in other financial markets.

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Thesis Defense Announcement for Walker Thames – 3/7/2024 at 10:30 AM

February 15, 2024

Thesis Title:  A Modular Compact kW-Class IPOS DC-DC Converter for Pulsed Power Applications

When:  3/7/2024 10:30 AM

Where:  Online via Webex

Candidate: Walker Thames

Degree:  Master of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering

Committee Members: Dr. Ryan B. Green, Dr. Masoud Karimi, Dr. Seungdeog Choi

Pulsed power systems are concerned with the delivery of significant amounts of power in a greatly condensed time frame. To achieve this, energy is often stored in a capacitor, where it can be rapidly discharged. Certain applications require repeated charging and discharging of the load capacitor in a specifically modulated manner; special power electronics systems must be developed for these situations. Existing systems on the market sacrifice a small form factor for greater pulsed power output. The proposed design outlines the development of a compact pulsed power capacitor charger capable of charging a load capacitor to high voltages at a pulse repetition frequency of 30 kHz. Due to the compact form factor, the charger features a unique design of four full-bridge converters modularly connected in Input-Parallel Output-Series configuration. Experimental verification shows that the system exceeds expectations and can be utilized and adapted to fit many pulsed power applications.

Category: Dissertations and Theses

Graduate Studies

Dissertation & Thesis Announcements

February 23, 2024.

  • Student: Ince, Fatih Location: CHTM 103 Time: 2:30 pm Department: Physics Astronomy Thesis/Dissertation Title: MBE Growth of Sb based alloys using interfacial misfit arrays for MWIR devices Committee Chair: Balakrishnan, Ganesh Committee Members: Addamane, Sadhvikas Han, Sang Rotter, Thomas

February 27, 2024

  • Student: Moes, Emily Location: PAIS 1010 Time: 2:30 pm Department: AS Anthropology Thesis/Dissertation Title: Sensitive developmental windows in craniofacial and dental fluctuating asymmetry Committee Chair: Edgar, Heather Committee Members: Kuzawa, Christopher Paul, Kathleen Thompson, Melissa

February 29, 2024

  • Student: Gunnare, Christopher Location: University of New Mexico Time: 10:00 am Department: Dept Teacher Ed, Ed Lead & Pol Thesis/Dissertation Title: A Phenomenological Study of Cognitive Dissonance in College Classroom Settings. Committee Chair: Borden, Allison Committee Members: Goodrich, Kristopher Walker, Trenia Wine, Douglas
  • Student: Sanchez, Alma Location: Zoom Meeting Time: 1:00 pm Department: Dept Teacher Ed, Ed Lead & Pol Thesis/Dissertation Title: You Did What with Technology? Exploring Student Narratives of Technology at a Research-Based University in the Southwest Committee Chair: Walker, Trenia Committee Members: Lopez, Patrick Nuci, Krenare O'Neill, Catherine

March 4, 2024

  • Student: Bohsali, Kalila Location: UNM Humanities Building Time: 10:00 am Department: English Thesis/Dissertation Title: The Reading Rooms: Harnessing Reading for Pleasure for the Literature Classroom Committee Chair: Haynie, Aeron Committee Members: Bourelle, Tiffany Chick, Nancy Townsend, Sarah
  • Student: Grann, Caitlin Location: Humanities 419 Time: 11:00 am Department: AS American Studies Thesis/Dissertation Title: The Lying Woman: Avant-Garde Collaboration in Jo Harvey Allen's Alt-Country Committee Chair: Holscher, Kathleen Committee Members: Correia, David Fox, Aaron Jacobsen, Kristina

March 5, 2024

  • Student: Seaburn, Brittney Location: Centennial 3004 Time: 9:00 am Department: Civil Engineering Civil Engr Thesis/Dissertation Title: Microcapsule Transport and Blockage in Rough-Walled Fractures Committee Chair: Stormont, John Committee Members: Carroll, Nichlaus Taha, Mahmoud Reda
  • Student: Dominguez, Sara Location: Zoom meeting Time: 1:30 pm Department: Organization Info Learning Sci Thesis/Dissertation Title: Teacher-Implemented Scaffolding Committee Chair: Svihla, Vanessa Committee Members: Emmons, Mark Hushman, Carolyn Law, Victor

March 6, 2024

  • Student: Olson, Laura Location: Hokona Hall Rm 352 Time: 12:00 pm Department: Music Thesis/Dissertation Title: Building Community Through Learning Traditional Irish Music Committee Chair: Jacobsen, Kristina Committee Members: Davies-Wilson, Dennis Richardson, Caleb Townsend, Sarah

March 19, 2024

  • Student: Berton Reilly, Elizabeth Location: Zoom Time: 10:30 am Department: Lang Literacy Sociocultural LL Thesis/Dissertation Title: The Wyandot Of Anderdon Nation Meaning-Making, Constructing, And Affirming Their Tribal Identities Through Archiving Historical Documents Committee Chair: Sims, Christine Committee Members: Cun, Aijuan Dallacqua, Ashley Lee, Lloyd
  • Student: You Mak, Kayley Location: Castetter 107 Time: 1:00 pm Department: AS Biology Thesis/Dissertation Title: Increasing bacterial tolerance and metabolism of the biofuel, n-butanol using community-level evolution and functional genomics Committee Chair: Hanson, David Committee Members: Hanschen, Erik Hovde, Blake Natvig, Donald

March 20, 2024

  • Student: Halley, Sleight Location: CMEM/AML Conference Room Time: 11:00 am Department: *Interdisciplinary:Engineering Thesis/Dissertation Title: Multi-element mixed potential sensors for natural gas leak detection: Design, Manufacturing, and Simulation Committee Chair: Garzon, Fernando Committee Members: Brosha, Eric Tsui, Lok-kun Wei, Shuya

March 27, 2024

  • Student: McCoy-Hayes, Shannon Location: Zoom Time: 1:30 pm Department: Dept Teacher Ed, Ed Lead & Pol Thesis/Dissertation Title: Women in Computer Science: Nevertheless They Persist Committee Chair: Borden, Allison Committee Members: Marsh, Tyson Smith-Hawkins, Paula Walker, Trenia

March 28, 2024

  • Student: Yepa-Gunderson, Danielle Location: Zoom Time: 1:00 pm Department: Dept Teacher Ed, Ed Lead & Pol Thesis/Dissertation Title: Indigenous Land Acknowledgement, Learning Spaces, and Sacred Places as Factors for Native American First-Year Students in Higher Education Committee Chair: Borden, Allison Committee Members: Cortez, Gabriel--ExternalCommitteeService Montoya, Catherine Secatero, Shawn

April 2, 2024

  • Student: Tuchman, Felicia Location: Zoom (https://unm.zoom.us/j/95052112111) Time: 10:00 am Department: Psychology Thesis/Dissertation Title: Predictors of Success in Controlled Drinking Outcomes Committee Chair: Witkiewitz, Katie A Committee Members: Hallgren, Kevin Moyers, Theresa

April 5, 2024

  • Student: Sanchez Rodriguez, Ossiris Location: Large Conference Room, Room #3031 Time: 3:00 pm Department: Civil Engineering Civil Engr Thesis/Dissertation Title: Longitudinal Spatial Trends in U.S. Bicyclist Fatalities, 2001-2020 Committee Chair: Ferenchak, Nicholas Committee Members: Losada Rojas, Lisa Lorena Mulchandani, Anjali

April 9, 2024

  • Student: Gorman, Zonnie Location: 1104 MVH Time: 1:30 pm Department: History Thesis/Dissertation Title: The First Twenty-Nine: A Microhistory of the Original Pilot Group of Navajo Code Talkers Committee Chair: Truett, Samuel Committee Members: Connell-Szasz, Margaret Florvil, Tiffany Guise, Holly Lee, Lloyd

April 12, 2024

  • Student: Farmin, Katherine Location: 200A Hartung Time: 12:00 pm Department: Theatre & Dance Thesis/Dissertation Title: Dissertation Committee Chair: Moss, Gregory Committee Members: Hart-Mann, Jeanette Jewell, Donna Rodriguez, Alejandro
  • Student: Mettler, Danielle Location: UNM Theatre and Dance Time: 2:00 pm Department: Theatre & Dance Thesis/Dissertation Title: TBA Committee Chair: Moss, Gregory Committee Members: Chavez, Lisa Ehn, Erik Jewell, Donna

April 17, 2024

  • Student: Zhang, Mingyang Location: PAIS; Zoom Time: 9:00 am Department: Physics Astronomy Thesis/Dissertation Title: Hybrid Membrane External-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (H-MECSEL) for Laser Guide Star Application Committee Chair: Albrecht, Alexander Committee Members: Acosta, Victor Cole, Garrett Feezell, Daniel

April 26, 2024

  • Student: Mani Varnoosfaderani, Amir Location: PAIS 2120 Co-op Room Time: 8:30 am Department: AS Biology Thesis/Dissertation Title: Brain microbiomes in salmonids: neuroimmunomodulatory functions in the central nervous system in homeostatic and dysbiotic states Committee Chair: Salinas, Irene Committee Members: Martinson, Vincent Meisel, Marlies Milligan, Erin
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Involving undergrads in chemistry research

A group of two dozen people stand in front of a fountain.

A Q&A with Prof. Ashleigh Theberge

Undergraduate researchers are an important part of Ashleigh Theberge’s chemistry laboratory at the University of Washington. Theberge, UW associate professor of chemistry, is co-principal investigator of the Theberge Group lab, which invents bioanalytical chemistry tools to improve healthcare and advance knowledge of chemical mechanisms in the body.

Theberge shares her thoughts about involving undergraduate students in the lab’s many research projects in the Q&A featured in the College of Arts & Sciences News .

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IMAGES

  1. Harrison Reeder Dissertation Defense flyer

    dissertation defense announcement

  2. Sample of Dissertation Defense Announcement

    dissertation defense announcement

  3. Sample of Master's Thesis Defense Announcement

    dissertation defense announcement

  4. (PDF) Doctoral Dissertation Defense Announcement

    dissertation defense announcement

  5. Final defense preparation

    dissertation defense announcement

  6. Dissertation Defense Announcement

    dissertation defense announcement

VIDEO

  1. Doctoral Dissertation Defense III

  2. Problem of Practice Dissertation Defense Presentation

  3. 5 Tips To Pass Your Thesis Defense

  4. Dissertation defense _ Ahmad Elnashar

  5. Leiter Dissertation Proposal Defense

  6. Soviet civil defense announcement: radiation hazard (Lithuanian)

COMMENTS

  1. Dissertation Defense Announcements

    March 12, 2024 11:00 AM Location: Zoom. Please email [email protected] for link Abstract: The overall aims of this dissertation were to identify factors that impacted 30-day COPD readmissions, inpatient mortality, and overall cost of care. Differences in area of residence were also assessed for all three outcomes.

  2. Thesis and Dissertation Defenses

    Feb 14 2024 CS Defense - Abduljaleel Al Rubaye Feb 22 2024 CS Defense - Mohammed Al Kinoon Feb 23 2024 CS Defense - Mohammed Alqadhi Mar 7 2024 ECE Defense - Sahin Gullu ECE Defense - Reza Rezaii

  3. Dissertation Defenses

    Joseph Stevens, MED Wed, 21 Feb 2024 ''Development of innate and adaptive immune responses to pneumonia in the newborn lung is uniquely programmed by gut microbiota'' View more dissertation defense announcements.

  4. Thesis & Dissertation

    Thesis/Dissertation Proposal Guidelines (PDF) Sample Proposals Biology - Sample 1 (PDF) | Sample 2 (PDF) | Sample 3 (PDF) Chemistry - Sample 1 (PDF) | Sample 2 (PDF) Earth Science - Sample (PDF) Education - Sample 1 (PDF) | Sample 2 (PDF) | Sample 3 (PDF) Electrical Engineering - Sample (PDF) Environmental Studies - Sample (PDF) LACC - Sample (PDF)

  5. MS Thesis and PhD Dissertation Final Defense Announcements

    Please submit thesis or dissertation final defense announcement at least 3 weeks prior to the defense date (requires 2nd review of thesis/dissertation document to have been processed by GSO)

  6. Defense

    The announcement must include: The time and date of the defense. The location of the defense. Your educational career data (e.g., B.S., IU, 1986, etc.-the major area is not needed). A description, in layman's terms, of your thesis (300 words or less) The eDoc will route to your department and the chairperson of your research committee for ...

  7. IU Dissertation Defense Announcements

    IU Dissertation Defense Announcements Upcoming Announcements This list of scheduled Ph.D. dissertation defenses is posted so that faculty and others may attend the defense. If you wish to attend, please contact the committee chair in advance as a courtesy. Friday, January 26, 2024, 10:00 a.m. IU School of Liberal Arts Health Communication

  8. Dissertation Defense Announcements

    Thesis and Dissertation Defense Announcements. The Graduate College is pleased to provide notice of the following scheduled thesis and dissertation defenses. Graduate faculty, students, and staff are welcome to attend dissertation defenses. Kindly contact the committee chair prior to the event if you plan on attending.

  9. Thesis & Dissertation Announcements

    Please use the following templates for Thesis and Dissertation Defense Announcements. You may wish to bookmark this page, as these will be updated when needed, and we want to ensure the information is up-to-date and accurate. Thesis Defense Announcement (.docx) Dissertation Defense Announcement - Non-Departmental Faculty Chair (.docx)

  10. Upcoming Defense Announcements

    Once the date of your defense has been established, you should complete the Ph.D. Defense Announcement Submission through OneStart. The announcement edoc must reach the Indiana University Graduate School Bloomington (UGSB) at least 30 days before the date of your defense.

  11. Defense Announcements

    Below is the published list of upcoming or recent dissertation defenses. To see the location and abstract of a defense candidate, please click on their named event and click 'more details'.

  12. PhD candidate Jon Gilgoff Dissertation Defense 2/29 2PM

    The PhD program is pleased to announce Jon Gilgoff will defend his Dissertation entitled "Comprehensive U.S. Federal Boys' and Men's Health Policy: Examining Barriers and Strategies Through a Mixed Methods Policy Delphi".Jon's study is chaired by Dr. Fernando Wagner. If you wish to attend the presentation portion of the defense on Thursday, February 29th at 2pm, please contact Jen Canapp ...

  13. PDF Sample Dissertation Announcement

    Email your dissertation defense announcement to [email protected] with "Defense Announcement of [your name]"as the subject. A sample dissertation announcement follows: Announcing the Final Examination of [your name] for the degree of [Doctor of Education/Doctor of Philosophy] Date of defense: ___________ Time and room: ___________

  14. PDF Announcing Your Thesis or Dissertation Defense

    Announcing Your Thesis or Dissertation Defense The tradition of the UNLV Graduate College is to announce all thesis and dissertation defenses. Thesis and dissertation defenses are open to the campus at large as well as the general public. Defense announcement should be publicized a minimum of two weeks prior to your defense date.

  15. Defense Announcements

    Chair: Henry Potter | Direct Link: https://grad.tamu.edu/aggie-life/Defense-Announcements#da3535 02/9/2024 | Madison Elizabeth Hetlage, PHD, Aerospace Engineering 2:00PM, 209 ALLEMO Tentative Title of Thesis / Dissertation / Record of Study: Development of an Active Barium Vapor Notch Filter for Ultraviolet Scattering Based Diagnostics Engineering

  16. Dissertation Announcements

    Dissertation Announcements After the Doctoral Dissertation Committee has determined that the final draft of the dissertation is suitable for presentation; the Committee will request the scheduling and announcement of the Dissertation Defense (also called Final Oral Examination or Oral Defense).

  17. Dissertation defense announcement, Xucheng Shi

    We are happy to announce PhD Candidate Xucheng Shi's dissertation defense on June 22, 2.00pm. Subject: Three Essays on Information Intermediaries in Capital Markets. This dissertation consists of three chapters that empirically investigate the economics of information intermediaries. The first chapter investigates whether a proxy advisory firm ...

  18. Theses & Dissertations

    The student is to submit the final approved thesis/dissertation, signed approval form, and the Internet release page in electronic form to the Office of Graduate Studies at [email protected] at least 10 working days prior to the official end of the term in which the student intends to graduate.

  19. Dissertation Defense Announcements

    Dissertation Defense Announcements Find a detailed listing below of dissertation defenses listed by date. 2024 2023 2022 2021 2020 2019 2018 2017 2016 Join Us We believe that knowledge is a public good Apply Request Info Attend an Event

  20. Watch This Ed.D. Dissertation Defense Via Zoom

    Watch This Ed.D. Dissertation Defense Via Zoom. February 19, 2024. Azman Sabet, candidate for the degree of Doctor of Education: Administrative Leadership, will defend their dissertation, "Lived Experience of At-Risk Accelerated Second-Degree (ASD) Nursing Students," at 3 p.m. Tuesday, March 5, via Zoom. ... Announcements. Close. Recent ...

  21. Dissertation Defense Announcement

    U of A Graduate School and International Education Graduate School Current Students Dissertation Defense Announcement To add a Dissertation Defense Announcement: Go to the UARK calendar and log in with your UARK username and password. Click on "Submit an Event" in the top right of the menu bar.

  22. Dissertation defense announcement, Junli Zhao, Finance

    We are happy to announce PhD Candidate Junli Zhao's dissertation defense on August 12, 4.00pm. Specialization: Finance Subject: Title : Essays on intermediation in financial markets Advisor: Jean-Edouard Colliard, Associate Professor, HEC Paris Abstract: The thesis contains three essays.In the first essay, I investigate whether financial experts benefit from more machine-readable data in ...

  23. Dissertation Defense Announcements

    Dissertation Title: Addressing the Importance of Recruitment and Retention of Black and Latinx Teachers: Strategies Designed to Diversify the Teacher Pipeline. Dissertation Abstract. Date: February 16, 2024. Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM. Video Conference: Click here to view the video conference (Zoom) Chair: Dr. Harrington Gibson.

  24. Thesis Defense Announcement for Walker Thames

    Thesis Defense Announcement for Walker Thames - 3/7/2024 at 10:30 AM. February 15, 2024. Thesis Title: A Modular Compact kW-Class IPOS DC-DC Converter for Pulsed Power Applications When: 3/7/2024 10:30 AM Where: Online via Webex Candidate: Walker Thames Degree: Master of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering Committee Members: Dr. Ryan B. Green, Dr. Masoud Karimi, Dr. Seungdeog Choi

  25. UNM Dissertation Announcements

    Dissertation & Thesis Announcements. Thesis-Dissertations Home. February 23, 2024. Student: Ince, Fatih Location: CHTM 103 Time: 2:30 pm Department: ... Thesis/Dissertation Title: Hybrid Membrane External-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (H-MECSEL) for Laser Guide Star Application

  26. Involving undergrads in chemistry research

    A Q&A with Prof. Ashleigh Theberge Undergraduate researchers are an important part of Ashleigh Theberge's chemistry laboratory at the University of Washington. Theberge, UW associate professor of chemistry, is co-principal investigator of the Theberge Group lab, which invents bioanalytical chemistry tools to improve healthcare and advance knowledge of chemical mechanisms in the body.