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25 Thesis Statement Examples That Will Make Writing a Breeze

JBirdwellBranson

Understanding what makes a good thesis statement is one of the major keys to writing a great research paper or argumentative essay. The thesis statement is where you make a claim that will guide you through your entire paper. If you find yourself struggling to make sense of your paper or your topic, then it's likely due to a weak thesis statement.

Let's take a minute to first understand what makes a solid thesis statement, and what key components you need to write one of your own.

Perfecting Your Thesis Statement

A thesis statement always goes at the beginning of the paper. It will typically be in the first couple of paragraphs of the paper so that it can introduce the body paragraphs, which are the supporting evidence for your thesis statement.

Your thesis statement should clearly identify an argument. You need to have a statement that is not only easy to understand, but one that is debatable. What that means is that you can't just put any statement of fact and have it be your thesis. For example, everyone knows that puppies are cute . An ineffective thesis statement would be, "Puppies are adorable and everyone knows it." This isn't really something that's a debatable topic.

Something that would be more debatable would be, "A puppy's cuteness is derived from its floppy ears, small body, and playfulness." These are three things that can be debated on. Some people might think that the cutest thing about puppies is the fact that they follow you around or that they're really soft and fuzzy.

All cuteness aside, you want to make sure that your thesis statement is not only debatable, but that it also actually thoroughly answers the research question that was posed. You always want to make sure that your evidence is supporting a claim that you made (and not the other way around). This is why it's crucial to read and research about a topic first and come to a conclusion later. If you try to get your research to fit your thesis statement, then it may not work out as neatly as you think. As you learn more, you discover more (and the outcome may not be what you originally thought).

Additionally, your thesis statement shouldn't be too big or too grand. It'll be hard to cover everything in a thesis statement like, "The federal government should act now on climate change." The topic is just too large to actually say something new and meaningful. Instead, a more effective thesis statement might be, "Local governments can combat climate change by providing citizens with larger recycling bins and offering local classes about composting and conservation." This is easier to work with because it's a smaller idea, but you can also discuss the overall topic that you might be interested in, which is climate change.

So, now that we know what makes a good, solid thesis statement, you can start to write your own. If you find that you're getting stuck or you are the type of person who needs to look at examples before you start something, then check out our list of thesis statement examples below.

Thesis statement examples

A quick note that these thesis statements have not been fully researched. These are merely examples to show you what a thesis statement might look like and how you can implement your own ideas into one that you think of independently. As such, you should not use these thesis statements for your own research paper purposes. They are meant to be used as examples only.

  • Vaccinations Because many children are unable to vaccinate due to illness, we must require that all healthy and able children be vaccinated in order to have herd immunity.
  • Educational Resources for Low-Income Students Schools should provide educational resources for low-income students during the summers so that they don't forget what they've learned throughout the school year.
  • School Uniforms School uniforms may be an upfront cost for families, but they eradicate the visual differences in income between students and provide a more egalitarian atmosphere at school.
  • Populism The rise in populism on the 2016 political stage was in reaction to increasing globalization, the decline of manufacturing jobs, and the Syrian refugee crisis.
  • Public Libraries Libraries are essential resources for communities and should be funded more heavily by local municipalities.
  • Cyber Bullying With more and more teens using smartphones and social media, cyber bullying is on the rise. Cyber bullying puts a lot of stress on many teens, and can cause depression, anxiety, and even suicidal thoughts. Parents should limit the usage of smart phones, monitor their children's online activity, and report any cyber bullying to school officials in order to combat this problem.
  • Medical Marijuana for Veterans Studies have shown that the use of medicinal marijuana has been helpful to veterans who suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Medicinal marijuana prescriptions should be legal in all states and provided to these veterans. Additional medical or therapy services should also be researched and implemented in order to help them re-integrate back into civilian life.
  • Work-Life Balance Corporations should provide more work from home opportunities and six-hour workdays so that office workers have a better work-life balance and are more likely to be productive when they are in the office.
  • Teaching Youths about Consensual Sex Although sex education that includes a discussion of consensual sex would likely lead to less sexual assault, parents need to teach their children the meaning of consent from a young age with age appropriate lessons.
  • Whether or Not to Attend University A degree from a university provides invaluable lessons on life and a future career, but not every high school student should be encouraged to attend a university directly after graduation. Some students may benefit from a trade school or a "gap year" where they can think more intensely about what it is they want to do for a career and how they can accomplish this.
  • Studying Abroad Studying abroad is one of the most culturally valuable experiences you can have in college. It is the only way to get completely immersed in another language and learn how other cultures and countries are different from your own.
  • Women's Body Image Magazines have done a lot in the last five years to include a more diverse group of models, but there is still a long way to go to promote a healthy woman's body image collectively as a culture.
  • Cigarette Tax Heavily taxing and increasing the price of cigarettes is essentially a tax on the poorest Americans, and it doesn't deter them from purchasing. Instead, the state and federal governments should target those economically disenfranchised with early education about the dangers of smoking.
  • Veganism A vegan diet, while a healthy and ethical way to consume food, indicates a position of privilege. It also limits you to other cultural food experiences if you travel around the world.
  • University Athletes Should be Compensated University athletes should be compensated for their service to the university, as it is difficult for these students to procure and hold a job with busy academic and athletic schedules. Many student athletes on scholarship also come from low-income neighborhoods and it is a struggle to make ends meet when they are participating in athletics.
  • Women in the Workforce Sheryl Sandberg makes a lot of interesting points in her best-selling book, Lean In , but she only addressed the very privileged working woman and failed to speak to those in lower-skilled, lower-wage jobs.
  • Assisted Suicide Assisted suicide should be legal and doctors should have the ability to make sure their patients have the end-of-life care that they want to receive.
  • Celebrity and Political Activism Although Taylor Swift's lyrics are indicative of a feminist perspective, she should be more politically active and vocal to use her position of power for the betterment of society.
  • The Civil War The insistence from many Southerners that the South seceded from the Union for states' rights versus the fact that they seceded for the purposes of continuing slavery is a harmful myth that still affects race relations today.
  • Blue Collar Workers Coal miners and other blue-collar workers whose jobs are slowly disappearing from the workforce should be re-trained in jobs in the technology sector or in renewable energy. A program to re-train these workers would not only improve local economies where jobs have been displaced, but would also lead to lower unemployment nationally.
  • Diversity in the Workforce Having a diverse group of people in an office setting leads to richer ideas, more cooperation, and more empathy between people with different skin colors or backgrounds.
  • Re-Imagining the Nuclear Family The nuclear family was traditionally defined as one mother, one father, and 2.5 children. This outdated depiction of family life doesn't quite fit with modern society. The definition of normal family life shouldn't be limited to two-parent households.
  • Digital Literacy Skills With more information readily available than ever before, it's crucial that students are prepared to examine the material they're reading and determine whether or not it's a good source or if it has misleading information. Teaching students digital literacy and helping them to understand the difference between opinion or propaganda from legitimate, real information is integral.
  • Beauty Pageants Beauty pageants are presented with the angle that they empower women. However, putting women in a swimsuit on a stage while simultaneously judging them on how well they answer an impossible question in a short period of time is cruel and purely for the amusement of men. Therefore, we should stop televising beauty pageants.
  • Supporting More Women to Run for a Political Position In order to get more women into political positions, more women must run for office. There must be a grassroots effort to educate women on how to run for office, who among them should run, and support for a future candidate for getting started on a political career.

Still stuck? Need some help with your thesis statement?

If you are still uncertain about how to write a thesis statement or what a good thesis statement is, be sure to consult with your teacher or professor to make sure you're on the right track. It's always a good idea to check in and make sure that your thesis statement is making a solid argument and that it can be supported by your research.

After you're done writing, it's important to have someone take a second look at your paper so that you can ensure there are no mistakes or errors. It's difficult to spot your own mistakes, which is why it's always recommended to have someone help you with the revision process, whether that's a teacher, the writing center at school, or a professional editor such as one from ServiceScape .

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The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Thesis Statements

What this handout is about.

This handout describes what a thesis statement is, how thesis statements work in your writing, and how you can craft or refine one for your draft.

Introduction

Writing in college often takes the form of persuasion—convincing others that you have an interesting, logical point of view on the subject you are studying. Persuasion is a skill you practice regularly in your daily life. You persuade your roommate to clean up, your parents to let you borrow the car, your friend to vote for your favorite candidate or policy. In college, course assignments often ask you to make a persuasive case in writing. You are asked to convince your reader of your point of view. This form of persuasion, often called academic argument, follows a predictable pattern in writing. After a brief introduction of your topic, you state your point of view on the topic directly and often in one sentence. This sentence is the thesis statement, and it serves as a summary of the argument you’ll make in the rest of your paper.

What is a thesis statement?

A thesis statement:

  • tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion.
  • is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper.
  • directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself. The subject, or topic, of an essay might be World War II or Moby Dick; a thesis must then offer a way to understand the war or the novel.
  • makes a claim that others might dispute.
  • is usually a single sentence near the beginning of your paper (most often, at the end of the first paragraph) that presents your argument to the reader. The rest of the paper, the body of the essay, gathers and organizes evidence that will persuade the reader of the logic of your interpretation.

If your assignment asks you to take a position or develop a claim about a subject, you may need to convey that position or claim in a thesis statement near the beginning of your draft. The assignment may not explicitly state that you need a thesis statement because your instructor may assume you will include one. When in doubt, ask your instructor if the assignment requires a thesis statement. When an assignment asks you to analyze, to interpret, to compare and contrast, to demonstrate cause and effect, or to take a stand on an issue, it is likely that you are being asked to develop a thesis and to support it persuasively. (Check out our handout on understanding assignments for more information.)

How do I create a thesis?

A thesis is the result of a lengthy thinking process. Formulating a thesis is not the first thing you do after reading an essay assignment. Before you develop an argument on any topic, you have to collect and organize evidence, look for possible relationships between known facts (such as surprising contrasts or similarities), and think about the significance of these relationships. Once you do this thinking, you will probably have a “working thesis” that presents a basic or main idea and an argument that you think you can support with evidence. Both the argument and your thesis are likely to need adjustment along the way.

Writers use all kinds of techniques to stimulate their thinking and to help them clarify relationships or comprehend the broader significance of a topic and arrive at a thesis statement. For more ideas on how to get started, see our handout on brainstorming .

How do I know if my thesis is strong?

If there’s time, run it by your instructor or make an appointment at the Writing Center to get some feedback. Even if you do not have time to get advice elsewhere, you can do some thesis evaluation of your own. When reviewing your first draft and its working thesis, ask yourself the following :

  • Do I answer the question? Re-reading the question prompt after constructing a working thesis can help you fix an argument that misses the focus of the question. If the prompt isn’t phrased as a question, try to rephrase it. For example, “Discuss the effect of X on Y” can be rephrased as “What is the effect of X on Y?”
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? If your thesis simply states facts that no one would, or even could, disagree with, it’s possible that you are simply providing a summary, rather than making an argument.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? Thesis statements that are too vague often do not have a strong argument. If your thesis contains words like “good” or “successful,” see if you could be more specific: why is something “good”; what specifically makes something “successful”?
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? If a reader’s first response is likely to  be “So what?” then you need to clarify, to forge a relationship, or to connect to a larger issue.
  • Does my essay support my thesis specifically and without wandering? If your thesis and the body of your essay do not seem to go together, one of them has to change. It’s okay to change your working thesis to reflect things you have figured out in the course of writing your paper. Remember, always reassess and revise your writing as necessary.
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? If a reader’s first response is “how?” or “why?” your thesis may be too open-ended and lack guidance for the reader. See what you can add to give the reader a better take on your position right from the beginning.

Suppose you are taking a course on contemporary communication, and the instructor hands out the following essay assignment: “Discuss the impact of social media on public awareness.” Looking back at your notes, you might start with this working thesis:

Social media impacts public awareness in both positive and negative ways.

You can use the questions above to help you revise this general statement into a stronger thesis.

  • Do I answer the question? You can analyze this if you rephrase “discuss the impact” as “what is the impact?” This way, you can see that you’ve answered the question only very generally with the vague “positive and negative ways.”
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? Not likely. Only people who maintain that social media has a solely positive or solely negative impact could disagree.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? No. What are the positive effects? What are the negative effects?
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? No. Why are they positive? How are they positive? What are their causes? Why are they negative? How are they negative? What are their causes?
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? No. Why should anyone care about the positive and/or negative impact of social media?

After thinking about your answers to these questions, you decide to focus on the one impact you feel strongly about and have strong evidence for:

Because not every voice on social media is reliable, people have become much more critical consumers of information, and thus, more informed voters.

This version is a much stronger thesis! It answers the question, takes a specific position that others can challenge, and it gives a sense of why it matters.

Let’s try another. Suppose your literature professor hands out the following assignment in a class on the American novel: Write an analysis of some aspect of Mark Twain’s novel Huckleberry Finn. “This will be easy,” you think. “I loved Huckleberry Finn!” You grab a pad of paper and write:

Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn is a great American novel.

You begin to analyze your thesis:

  • Do I answer the question? No. The prompt asks you to analyze some aspect of the novel. Your working thesis is a statement of general appreciation for the entire novel.

Think about aspects of the novel that are important to its structure or meaning—for example, the role of storytelling, the contrasting scenes between the shore and the river, or the relationships between adults and children. Now you write:

In Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain develops a contrast between life on the river and life on the shore.
  • Do I answer the question? Yes!
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? Not really. This contrast is well-known and accepted.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? It’s getting there–you have highlighted an important aspect of the novel for investigation. However, it’s still not clear what your analysis will reveal.
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? Not yet. Compare scenes from the book and see what you discover. Free write, make lists, jot down Huck’s actions and reactions and anything else that seems interesting.
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? What’s the point of this contrast? What does it signify?”

After examining the evidence and considering your own insights, you write:

Through its contrasting river and shore scenes, Twain’s Huckleberry Finn suggests that to find the true expression of American democratic ideals, one must leave “civilized” society and go back to nature.

This final thesis statement presents an interpretation of a literary work based on an analysis of its content. Of course, for the essay itself to be successful, you must now present evidence from the novel that will convince the reader of your interpretation.

Works consulted

We consulted these works while writing this handout. This is not a comprehensive list of resources on the handout’s topic, and we encourage you to do your own research to find additional publications. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For guidance on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial . We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback.

Anson, Chris M., and Robert A. Schwegler. 2010. The Longman Handbook for Writers and Readers , 6th ed. New York: Longman.

Lunsford, Andrea A. 2015. The St. Martin’s Handbook , 8th ed. Boston: Bedford/St Martin’s.

Ramage, John D., John C. Bean, and June Johnson. 2018. The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing , 8th ed. New York: Pearson.

Ruszkiewicz, John J., Christy Friend, Daniel Seward, and Maxine Hairston. 2010. The Scott, Foresman Handbook for Writers , 9th ed. Boston: Pearson Education.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Your thesis is the central claim in your essay—your main insight or idea about your source or topic. Your thesis should appear early in an academic essay, followed by a logically constructed argument that supports this central claim. A strong thesis is arguable, which means a thoughtful reader could disagree with it and therefore needs your careful analysis of the evidence to understand how you arrived at this claim. You arrive at your thesis by examining and analyzing the evidence available to you, which might be text or other types of source material.

A thesis will generally respond to an analytical question or pose a solution to a problem that you have framed for your readers (and for yourself). When you frame that question or problem for your readers, you are telling them what is at stake in your argument—why your question matters and why they should care about the answer . If you can explain to your readers why a question or problem is worth addressing, then they will understand why it’s worth reading an essay that develops your thesis—and you will understand why it’s worth writing that essay.

A strong thesis will be arguable rather than descriptive , and it will be the right scope for the essay you are writing. If your thesis is descriptive, then you will not need to convince your readers of anything—you will be naming or summarizing something your readers can already see for themselves. If your thesis is too narrow, you won’t be able to explore your topic in enough depth to say something interesting about it. If your thesis is too broad, you may not be able to support it with evidence from the available sources.

When you are writing an essay for a course assignment, you should make sure you understand what type of claim you are being asked to make. Many of your assignments will be asking you to make analytical claims , which are based on interpretation of facts, data, or sources.

Some of your assignments may ask you to make normative claims. Normative claims are claims of value or evaluation rather than fact—claims about how things should be rather than how they are. A normative claim makes the case for the importance of something, the action that should be taken, or the way the world should be. When you are asked to write a policy memo, a proposal, or an essay based on your own opinion, you will be making normative claims.

Here are some examples of possible thesis statements for a student's analysis of the article “The Case Against Perfection” by Professor Michael Sandel.  

Descriptive thesis (not arguable)  

While Sandel argues that pursuing perfection through genetic engineering would decrease our sense of humility, he claims that the sense of solidarity we would lose is also important.

This thesis summarizes several points in Sandel’s argument, but it does not make a claim about how we should understand his argument. A reader who read Sandel’s argument would not also need to read an essay based on this descriptive thesis.  

Broad thesis (arguable, but difficult to support with evidence)  

Michael Sandel’s arguments about genetic engineering do not take into consideration all the relevant issues.

This is an arguable claim because it would be possible to argue against it by saying that Michael Sandel’s arguments do take all of the relevant issues into consideration. But the claim is too broad. Because the thesis does not specify which “issues” it is focused on—or why it matters if they are considered—readers won’t know what the rest of the essay will argue, and the writer won’t know what to focus on. If there is a particular issue that Sandel does not address, then a more specific version of the thesis would include that issue—hand an explanation of why it is important.  

Arguable thesis with analytical claim  

While Sandel argues persuasively that our instinct to “remake” (54) ourselves into something ever more perfect is a problem, his belief that we can always draw a line between what is medically necessary and what makes us simply “better than well” (51) is less convincing.

This is an arguable analytical claim. To argue for this claim, the essay writer will need to show how evidence from the article itself points to this interpretation. It’s also a reasonable scope for a thesis because it can be supported with evidence available in the text and is neither too broad nor too narrow.  

Arguable thesis with normative claim  

Given Sandel’s argument against genetic enhancement, we should not allow parents to decide on using Human Growth Hormone for their children.

This thesis tells us what we should do about a particular issue discussed in Sandel’s article, but it does not tell us how we should understand Sandel’s argument.  

Questions to ask about your thesis  

  • Is the thesis truly arguable? Does it speak to a genuine dilemma in the source, or would most readers automatically agree with it?  
  • Is the thesis too obvious? Again, would most or all readers agree with it without needing to see your argument?  
  • Is the thesis complex enough to require a whole essay's worth of argument?  
  • Is the thesis supportable with evidence from the text rather than with generalizations or outside research?  
  • Would anyone want to read a paper in which this thesis was developed? That is, can you explain what this paper is adding to our understanding of a problem, question, or topic?
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college thesis examples

How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement: 4 Steps + Examples

college thesis examples

What’s Covered:

What is the purpose of a thesis statement, writing a good thesis statement: 4 steps, common pitfalls to avoid, where to get your essay edited for free.

When you set out to write an essay, there has to be some kind of point to it, right? Otherwise, your essay would just be a big jumble of word salad that makes absolutely no sense. An essay needs a central point that ties into everything else. That main point is called a thesis statement, and it’s the core of any essay or research paper.

You may hear about Master degree candidates writing a thesis, and that is an entire paper–not to be confused with the thesis statement, which is typically one sentence that contains your paper’s focus. 

Read on to learn more about thesis statements and how to write them. We’ve also included some solid examples for you to reference.

Typically the last sentence of your introductory paragraph, the thesis statement serves as the roadmap for your essay. When your reader gets to the thesis statement, they should have a clear outline of your main point, as well as the information you’ll be presenting in order to either prove or support your point. 

The thesis statement should not be confused for a topic sentence , which is the first sentence of every paragraph in your essay. If you need help writing topic sentences, numerous resources are available. Topic sentences should go along with your thesis statement, though.

Since the thesis statement is the most important sentence of your entire essay or paper, it’s imperative that you get this part right. Otherwise, your paper will not have a good flow and will seem disjointed. That’s why it’s vital not to rush through developing one. It’s a methodical process with steps that you need to follow in order to create the best thesis statement possible.

Step 1: Decide what kind of paper you’re writing

When you’re assigned an essay, there are several different types you may get. Argumentative essays are designed to get the reader to agree with you on a topic. Informative or expository essays present information to the reader. Analytical essays offer up a point and then expand on it by analyzing relevant information. Thesis statements can look and sound different based on the type of paper you’re writing. For example:

  • Argumentative: The United States needs a viable third political party to decrease bipartisanship, increase options, and help reduce corruption in government.
  • Informative: The Libertarian party has thrown off elections before by gaining enough support in states to get on the ballot and by taking away crucial votes from candidates.
  • Analytical: An analysis of past presidential elections shows that while third party votes may have been the minority, they did affect the outcome of the elections in 2020, 2016, and beyond.

Step 2: Figure out what point you want to make

Once you know what type of paper you’re writing, you then need to figure out the point you want to make with your thesis statement, and subsequently, your paper. In other words, you need to decide to answer a question about something, such as:

  • What impact did reality TV have on American society?
  • How has the musical Hamilton affected perception of American history?
  • Why do I want to major in [chosen major here]?

If you have an argumentative essay, then you will be writing about an opinion. To make it easier, you may want to choose an opinion that you feel passionate about so that you’re writing about something that interests you. For example, if you have an interest in preserving the environment, you may want to choose a topic that relates to that. 

If you’re writing your college essay and they ask why you want to attend that school, you may want to have a main point and back it up with information, something along the lines of:

“Attending Harvard University would benefit me both academically and professionally, as it would give me a strong knowledge base upon which to build my career, develop my network, and hopefully give me an advantage in my chosen field.”

Step 3: Determine what information you’ll use to back up your point

Once you have the point you want to make, you need to figure out how you plan to back it up throughout the rest of your essay. Without this information, it will be hard to either prove or argue the main point of your thesis statement. If you decide to write about the Hamilton example, you may decide to address any falsehoods that the writer put into the musical, such as:

“The musical Hamilton, while accurate in many ways, leaves out key parts of American history, presents a nationalist view of founding fathers, and downplays the racism of the times.”

Once you’ve written your initial working thesis statement, you’ll then need to get information to back that up. For example, the musical completely leaves out Benjamin Franklin, portrays the founding fathers in a nationalist way that is too complimentary, and shows Hamilton as a staunch abolitionist despite the fact that his family likely did own slaves. 

Step 4: Revise and refine your thesis statement before you start writing

Read through your thesis statement several times before you begin to compose your full essay. You need to make sure the statement is ironclad, since it is the foundation of the entire paper. Edit it or have a peer review it for you to make sure everything makes sense and that you feel like you can truly write a paper on the topic. Once you’ve done that, you can then begin writing your paper.

When writing a thesis statement, there are some common pitfalls you should avoid so that your paper can be as solid as possible. Make sure you always edit the thesis statement before you do anything else. You also want to ensure that the thesis statement is clear and concise. Don’t make your reader hunt for your point. Finally, put your thesis statement at the end of the first paragraph and have your introduction flow toward that statement. Your reader will expect to find your statement in its traditional spot.

If you’re having trouble getting started, or need some guidance on your essay, there are tools available that can help you. CollegeVine offers a free peer essay review tool where one of your peers can read through your essay and provide you with valuable feedback. Getting essay feedback from a peer can help you wow your instructor or college admissions officer with an impactful essay that effectively illustrates your point.

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University Thesis and Dissertation Templates

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Theses and dissertations are already intensive, long-term projects that require a lot of effort and time from their authors. Formatting for submission to the university is often the last thing that graduate students do, and may delay earning the relevant degree if done incorrectly.

Below are some strategies graduate students can use to deal with institutional formatting requirements to earn their degrees on time.

Disciplinary conventions are still paramount.

Scholars in your own discipline are the most common readers of your dissertation; your committee, too, will expect your work to match with their expectations as members of your field. The style guide your field uses most commonly is always the one you should follow, and if your field uses conventions such as including all figures and illustrations at the end of the document, you should do so. After these considerations are met, move on to university formatting. Almost always, university formatting only deals with things like margins, font, numbering of chapters and sections, and illustrations; disciplinary style conventions in content such as APA's directive to use only last names of authors in-text are not interfered with by university formatting at all.

Use your university's formatting guidelines and templates to your advantage.

If your institution has a template for formatting your thesis or dissertation that you can use, do so. Don't look at another student's document and try to replicate it yourself. These templates typically have the necessary section breaks and styles already in the document, and you can copy in your work from your existing draft using the style pane in MS Word to ensure you're using the correct formatting (similarly with software such as Overleaf when writing in LaTeX, templates do a lot of the work for you). It's also often easier for workers in the offices that deal with theses and dissertations to help you with your work if you're using their template — they are familiar with these templates and can often navigate them more proficiently.

These templates also include placeholders for all front matter you will need to include in your thesis or dissertation, and may include guidelines for how to write these. Front matter includes your table of contents, acknowledgements, abstract, abbreviation list, figure list, committee page, and (sometimes) academic history or CV; everything before your introduction is front matter. Since front matter pages such as the author's academic history and dissertation committee are usually for the graduate school and not for your department, your advisor might not remember to have you include them. Knowing about them well before your deposit date means you won't be scrambling to fill in placeholders at the last minute or getting your work returned for revision from the graduate school.

Consider institutional formatting early and often.

Many graduate students leave this aspect of submitting their projects until it's almost too late to work on it, causing delays in obtaining their degree. Simply being aware that this is a task you'll have to complete and making sure you know where templates are, who you can ask for help in your graduate office or your department, and what your institution's guidelines are can help alleviate this issue. Once you know what you'll be expected to do to convert to university formatting, you can set regular check-in times for yourself to do this work in pieces rather than all at once (for instance, when you've completed a chapter and had it approved by your chair). 

Consider fair use for images and other third-party content.

Most theses and dissertations are published through ProQuest or another publisher (Harvard, for instance, uses their own open publishing service). For this reason, it may be the case that your institution requires all images or other content obtained from other sources to fall under fair use rules or, if an image is not considered under fair use, you'll have to obtain permission to print it in your dissertation. Your institution should have more guidance on their specific expectations for fair use content; knowing what these guidelines are well in advance of your deposit date means you won't have to make last-minute changes or removals to deposit your work.

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25 Thesis Statement Examples

thesis statement examples and definition, explained below

A thesis statement is needed in an essay or dissertation . There are multiple types of thesis statements – but generally we can divide them into expository and argumentative. An expository statement is a statement of fact (common in expository essays and process essays) while an argumentative statement is a statement of opinion (common in argumentative essays and dissertations). Below are examples of each.

Strong Thesis Statement Examples

school uniforms and dress codes, explained below

1. School Uniforms

“Mandatory school uniforms should be implemented in educational institutions as they promote a sense of equality, reduce distractions, and foster a focused and professional learning environment.”

Best For: Argumentative Essay or Debate

Read More: School Uniforms Pros and Cons

nature vs nurture examples and definition

2. Nature vs Nurture

“This essay will explore how both genetic inheritance and environmental factors equally contribute to shaping human behavior and personality.”

Best For: Compare and Contrast Essay

Read More: Nature vs Nurture Debate

American Dream Examples Definition

3. American Dream

“The American Dream, a symbol of opportunity and success, is increasingly elusive in today’s socio-economic landscape, revealing deeper inequalities in society.”

Best For: Persuasive Essay

Read More: What is the American Dream?

social media pros and cons

4. Social Media

“Social media has revolutionized communication and societal interactions, but it also presents significant challenges related to privacy, mental health, and misinformation.”

Best For: Expository Essay

Read More: The Pros and Cons of Social Media

types of globalization, explained below

5. Globalization

“Globalization has created a world more interconnected than ever before, yet it also amplifies economic disparities and cultural homogenization.”

Read More: Globalization Pros and Cons

urbanization example and definition

6. Urbanization

“Urbanization drives economic growth and social development, but it also poses unique challenges in sustainability and quality of life.”

Read More: Learn about Urbanization

immigration pros and cons, explained below

7. Immigration

“Immigration enriches receiving countries culturally and economically, outweighing any perceived social or economic burdens.”

Read More: Immigration Pros and Cons

cultural identity examples and definition, explained below

8. Cultural Identity

“In a globalized world, maintaining distinct cultural identities is crucial for preserving cultural diversity and fostering global understanding, despite the challenges of assimilation and homogenization.”

Best For: Argumentative Essay

Read More: Learn about Cultural Identity

technology examples and definition explained below

9. Technology

“Medical technologies in care institutions in Toronto has increased subjcetive outcomes for patients with chronic pain.”

Best For: Research Paper

capitalism examples and definition

10. Capitalism vs Socialism

“The debate between capitalism and socialism centers on balancing economic freedom and inequality, each presenting distinct approaches to resource distribution and social welfare.”

cultural heritage examples and definition

11. Cultural Heritage

“The preservation of cultural heritage is essential, not only for cultural identity but also for educating future generations, outweighing the arguments for modernization and commercialization.”

pseudoscience examples and definition, explained below

12. Pseudoscience

“Pseudoscience, characterized by a lack of empirical support, continues to influence public perception and decision-making, often at the expense of scientific credibility.”

Read More: Examples of Pseudoscience

free will examples and definition, explained below

13. Free Will

“The concept of free will is largely an illusion, with human behavior and decisions predominantly determined by biological and environmental factors.”

Read More: Do we have Free Will?

gender roles examples and definition, explained below

14. Gender Roles

“Traditional gender roles are outdated and harmful, restricting individual freedoms and perpetuating gender inequalities in modern society.”

Read More: What are Traditional Gender Roles?

work-life balance examples and definition, explained below

15. Work-Life Ballance

“The trend to online and distance work in the 2020s led to improved subjective feelings of work-life balance but simultaneously increased self-reported loneliness.”

Read More: Work-Life Balance Examples

universal healthcare pros and cons

16. Universal Healthcare

“Universal healthcare is a fundamental human right and the most effective system for ensuring health equity and societal well-being, outweighing concerns about government involvement and costs.”

Read More: The Pros and Cons of Universal Healthcare

raising minimum wage pros and cons

17. Minimum Wage

“The implementation of a fair minimum wage is vital for reducing economic inequality, yet it is often contentious due to its potential impact on businesses and employment rates.”

Read More: The Pros and Cons of Raising the Minimum Wage

homework pros and cons

18. Homework

“The homework provided throughout this semester has enabled me to achieve greater self-reflection, identify gaps in my knowledge, and reinforce those gaps through spaced repetition.”

Best For: Reflective Essay

Read More: Reasons Homework Should be Banned

charter schools vs public schools, explained below

19. Charter Schools

“Charter schools offer alternatives to traditional public education, promising innovation and choice but also raising questions about accountability and educational equity.”

Read More: The Pros and Cons of Charter Schools

internet pros and cons

20. Effects of the Internet

“The Internet has drastically reshaped human communication, access to information, and societal dynamics, generally with a net positive effect on society.”

Read More: The Pros and Cons of the Internet

affirmative action example and definition, explained below

21. Affirmative Action

“Affirmative action is essential for rectifying historical injustices and achieving true meritocracy in education and employment, contrary to claims of reverse discrimination.”

Best For: Essay

Read More: Affirmative Action Pros and Cons

soft skills examples and definition, explained below

22. Soft Skills

“Soft skills, such as communication and empathy, are increasingly recognized as essential for success in the modern workforce, and therefore should be a strong focus at school and university level.”

Read More: Soft Skills Examples

moral panic definition examples

23. Moral Panic

“Moral panic, often fueled by media and cultural anxieties, can lead to exaggerated societal responses that sometimes overlook rational analysis and evidence.”

Read More: Moral Panic Examples

freedom of the press example and definition, explained below

24. Freedom of the Press

“Freedom of the press is critical for democracy and informed citizenship, yet it faces challenges from censorship, media bias, and the proliferation of misinformation.”

Read More: Freedom of the Press Examples

mass media examples definition

25. Mass Media

“Mass media shapes public opinion and cultural norms, but its concentration of ownership and commercial interests raise concerns about bias and the quality of information.”

Best For: Critical Analysis

Read More: Mass Media Examples

Checklist: How to use your Thesis Statement

✅ Position: If your statement is for an argumentative or persuasive essay, or a dissertation, ensure it takes a clear stance on the topic. ✅ Specificity: It addresses a specific aspect of the topic, providing focus for the essay. ✅ Conciseness: Typically, a thesis statement is one to two sentences long. It should be concise, clear, and easily identifiable. ✅ Direction: The thesis statement guides the direction of the essay, providing a roadmap for the argument, narrative, or explanation. ✅ Evidence-based: While the thesis statement itself doesn’t include evidence, it sets up an argument that can be supported with evidence in the body of the essay. ✅ Placement: Generally, the thesis statement is placed at the end of the introduction of an essay.

Try These AI Prompts – Thesis Statement Generator!

One way to brainstorm thesis statements is to get AI to brainstorm some for you! Try this AI prompt:

💡 AI PROMPT FOR EXPOSITORY THESIS STATEMENT I am writing an essay on [TOPIC] and these are the instructions my teacher gave me: [INSTUCTIONS]. I want you to create an expository thesis statement that doesn’t argue a position, but demonstrates depth of knowledge about the topic.

💡 AI PROMPT FOR ARGUMENTATIVE THESIS STATEMENT I am writing an essay on [TOPIC] and these are the instructions my teacher gave me: [INSTRUCTIONS]. I want you to create an argumentative thesis statement that clearly takes a position on this issue.

💡 AI PROMPT FOR COMPARE AND CONTRAST THESIS STATEMENT I am writing a compare and contrast essay that compares [Concept 1] and [Concept2]. Give me 5 potential single-sentence thesis statements that remain objective.

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Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 50 Durable Goods Examples
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 100 Consumer Goods Examples
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 30 Globalization Pros and Cons
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 17 Adversity Examples (And How to Overcome Them)

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Essay Writing Guide

Thesis Statement Examples

Nova A.

20+ Thesis Statement Examples for Different Types of Essays?

Published on: Oct 18, 2017

Last updated on: Dec 30, 2023

thesis statement examples

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Are you finding it tough to come up with a strong thesis statement? Well, you're not alone! 

Creating a short and clear thesis statement might seem tricky, but it's a really important part of your essays and research papers. It's like the main message of your whole paper in just one sentence. 

But don't worry, we're here to help. In this blog, we've gathered over 20 examples of different kinds of essays. These examples will show you exactly how to do it. 

So, let's dive in and read on to learn more.

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Thesis Statement Examples for Different Essay Types

A thesis statement is like the central message of your essay. It states the main claim along with the reason or rationale that supports the claim. It's a single sentence that sums up what your essay is all about. 

When someone reads your essay, they should know from the thesis statement what your essay is trying to prove or explain. 

Now, in some cases, like more complex essays or research papers, you might use a three-point thesis statement. This means your thesis statement has not just one, but three main ideas or arguments that your essay will explore.

Here are some good thesis statement examples for the common types of essays:

Argumentative Thesis Statement Examples

An argumentative essay persuades by presenting evidence on a debatable topic. Here is what a thesis statement looks like for an argumentative essay:

Claim + Reasons/Evidence

Here are argumentative essay thesis statement examples:

  • "Social media negatively impacts mental health by fostering excessive comparison and cyberbullying, leading to increased stress and anxiety among users."
  • "Stricter gun control laws are necessary to reduce firearm-related violence in our society, as evidenced by lower rates of gun violence in countries with stringent gun control measures and the potential to prevent potentially dangerous individuals from acquiring firearms."

Informative Thesis Statement Examples

An informative essay educates by presenting facts and details on a specific topic. The thesis statement typically takes this form:

Topic + Main Points

Here are informative essay thesis statement examples:

  • "The history, symptoms, and available treatments for diabetes provide essential knowledge for individuals managing this chronic condition."
  • "Exploring the causes, effects, and preventive measures of climate change sheds light on the urgent need for global environmental action."

Literary Analysis Thesis Statement Examples

In a literary analysis essay , the writer examines a specific element of a literary work. The thesis statement for literary analysis generally follows this structure:

Analysis of Element in Literary Work + Significance

Here are literary analysis thesis statement examples:

  • "The symbolism of the 'green light' in 'The Great Gatsby' represents Gatsby's unattainable American Dream and the disillusionment of the Jazz Age."
  • "Examining the character of Macbeth's descent into madness in 'Macbeth' reveals the tragic consequences of unchecked ambition in Shakespearean tragedy."

Analytical Thesis Statement Examples

An analytical essay delves into a topic by evaluating and presenting multiple perspectives. The thesis statement in an analytical essay often appears as:

Topic + Analysis/Examination

Here are analytical essay thesis statement examples:

  • "Analyzing the economic impact of globalization on developing countries reveals both opportunities for growth and potential challenges."
  • "An examination of societal norms in 'The Catcher in the Rye' underscores the alienation experienced by the protagonist, Holden Caulfield."

Expository Thesis Statement Examples

Expository essays aim to explain or inform by providing details and facts on a subject. The typical expository thesis statement format is:

Subject + Key Aspects

Here are expository essay thesis statement examples:

  • "The exploration of the solar system, including the sun, planets, and asteroids, showcases the vastness and complexity of our cosmic neighborhood."
  • "Understanding the process of photosynthesis, its significance in plant growth, and its role in producing oxygen is vital for comprehending Earth's ecosystems."

Cause And Effect Thesis Statement Examples

Cause and effect essays investigate the relationships between events or phenomena. The thesis statement structure in a cause and effect essay is:

Cause + Effect

Here are cause and effect essay thesis statement examples:

  • "The increase in technology usage has led to a decline in face-to-face social interactions among young adults, contributing to feelings of isolation."
  • "The depletion of the ozone layer results in harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the Earth's surface, leading to various environmental and health consequences."

Narrative Thesis Statement Examples

Narrative essays recount personal experiences or stories. The thesis statement in a narrative essay is often shaped as:

Personal Experience/Story + Significance

Here are narrative essay thesis statement examples:

  • "My backpacking adventure through the Appalachian Trail taught me resilience, self-reliance, and a deep appreciation for the beauty of nature."
  • "The story of my grandmother's immigration journey reflects the strength, determination, and sacrifices made by countless immigrants seeking a better life."

Thesis Statement Examples For Opinion Essays

Opinion essays express the author's viewpoint on a particular subject. You can follow this structure to write a thesis statement in an opinion essay:

Topic + Opinion/Position

Here are thesis statement examples for opinion essays:

  • "Universal healthcare is a fundamental right that should be accessible to all citizens, ensuring equitable access to medical services."
  • "The widespread use of technology in education enhances learning opportunities, preparing students for a tech-driven world."

Thesis Statement Examples for Problem Solution Essay

In a problem-solution essay, the writer identifies a specific problem and proposes a viable solution or solutions to address it. The thesis statement in a problem-solution essay typically follows this structure:

Problem + Solution

Here are thesis statement examples for problem solution essays:

  • "The rising prevalence of food insecurity can be mitigated through community-based programs that promote urban farming and food distribution initiatives."
  • "To combat the issue of plastic pollution in oceans, a comprehensive approach involving strict regulations, public awareness campaigns, and sustainable alternatives is necessary."

Thesis Statement Examples for English Essays

English essays encompass a wide range of topics, from literary analysis to language studies. The thesis statement for English essays can take various forms depending on the specific focus of the essay.

Here are thesis statement examples for different types of English essays:

  • For a Literary Analysis Essay: "The use of symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne's 'The Scarlet Letter' underscores the theme of societal hypocrisy and the journey of self-redemption."
  • For a Language and Linguistics Essay: "Exploring the evolution of the English language through historical context reveals the influences and transformations that have shaped it into its current form."
  • For a Comparative Literature Essay: "Comparing the themes of love and tragedy in Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet' and Jane Austen's 'Pride and Prejudice' highlights the universal aspects of human emotions."

Thesis Statement Examples for Research Paper

A research paper often critically analyzes a specific topic or issue, conducting in-depth exploration and analysis.

While all academic papers require a thesis statement to convey the central message, they differ in scope and depth. 

Research paper thesis statements are broad and involve in-depth research, often including empirical research, while essay thesis statements are shorter and focus on a specific argument.

Here are some examples of research papers of different natures:

  • For an Analytical Research Paper: "An analysis of historical voting patterns reveals shifts in political ideologies over the past century, shedding light on changing voter demographics and their impact on contemporary elections."
  • For an Experimental Research Paper: "Through controlled experiments and statistical analysis, this research examines the effects of a new drug on patients with a specific medical condition, offering insights into its potential for widespread therapeutic use."
  • For a Comparative Research Paper: "This research paper compares and contrasts the educational systems of two countries, Japan and Finland, exploring the factors contributing to their respective success in student performance and learning outcomes."
  • For a Case Study Research Paper: "Through an in-depth case study of a successful tech startup, this research paper analyzes the key factors behind its rapid growth and profitability, offering valuable insights for aspiring entrepreneurs."

These examples illustrate the diversity of research paper thesis statements, each tailored to the specific focus and methodology of the research.

Elements of a Good Thesis Statement

A strong and clear thesis statement exhibits several crucial elements:

  • Specific Topic: It addresses a well-defined subject or issue.
  • Debatable Stance: The thesis takes a position that can be debated or questioned.
  • Narrow Focus: It doesn't encompass too broad a scope but rather hones in on a specific aspect.
  • Single Central Idea: It conveys a solitary, precise main point.
  • Supportable: It answers the question with evidence, facts, or reasons in the essay.
  • Clear Position: It presents a distinct viewpoint on the topic.

Example of a Good Thesis Statement

"Increasing access to quality education in underserved communities is essential for addressing socio-economic disparities, and this can be achieved through improved school funding, qualified educators, and community involvement."

Here is an analysis of the elements of the above thesis statement example:

This thesis statement exemplifies these elements well. It explicitly addresses the topic of "increasing access to quality education in underserved communities." 

It takes a debatable stance as the strategies for achieving this goal can vary. It narrows the focus by discussing specific solutions: "improved school funding, qualified educators, and community involvement." 

The central idea is that these actions are necessary to address socio-economic disparities through education. While the evidence isn't in the thesis itself, it's implied that the essay will support these claims . The position is clear: these actions are essential. 

Here’s an example of a good thesis statement versus a bad one:

Good Vs. Bad Thesis Statement - MyPerfectWords.com

You now have a wide range of thesis statement examples to learn from. 

But if you're running low on time or confidence, our reliable essay writing service is here to assist you. Our skilled writers can create clear and strong thesis statements in top-notch essays. 

With their experience and expertise, you can be sure you’ll receive original, unique, and quality essays every time. 

Nova A. (Literature, Marketing)

Nova Allison is a Digital Content Strategist with over eight years of experience. Nova has also worked as a technical and scientific writer. She is majorly involved in developing and reviewing online content plans that engage and resonate with audiences. Nova has a passion for writing that engages and informs her readers.

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Thesis Statements: Examples

  • Where Do Theses Come From?

Bullying in elementary schools is getting worse, because children model what they see at home and there are more cases of physical and emotional child abuse, and this causes various emotional problems in children.

In order to be truly effective, anti-bullying policies should focus on the home life of the bully, because of the strong connection between parental actions and attitudes and the way a student treats his or her peers.

Explanation

The first example tries to cover too many topics: bullying is getting worse, bullying is related to the student's home life, and bullying causes various emotional problems in children.  The second example focuses only on the connection between a student's home life and tendency towards bullying.

Abortion is a terrible practice that only deranged, baby-killing monsters would advocate under the guise of being pro-choice.

Despite the appeal of freedom of choice, the legalization of abortion has been detrimental to the well-being of women in America.

The first example states a strong opinion, but does not offer any facts to back it up.  The explosive language is likely to alienate even readers who may have been sympathetic to the writer's position.  The second example promises to offer a rational, if still opinioned, look at the issue.

Texting your sister who is in the next room to ask her to bring you your backpack means that you should get a life.

The use of technology to replace face to face communication increases the feeling of isolation among American youth.

The first statement is too specific to be a thesis statement.  If reworded for a more academic structure, the specific anecdote could be used to prove a broader point, but, as it is, the author would have difficulty writing an entire paper about this one incident.  The second thesis statement is broad enough that an entire paper could be written about it.

The government should legalize the use of marijuana.

The governement should legalize the use of marijuana in order to benefit from sales taxes of the drug and in order to make it more easily available to people who need it for medical reasons.

The first statement is debatable, but gives no sign that the author has any reasons for making such a statement.  The second thesis statement offers logical reasons, which the reader can assume the author will expound upon in the rest of the paper.

People who are healthy and have healthy organs should be allowed to find other people in need of organs that they don't need, like a kidney, and sell them to the other people because that could save lives if a financial incentive was offered, instead of just relying on people's charity.

The purchase and sale of organs should be legalized in order to better facilitate the saving of lives.

More words don't always make a better thesis.  The second thesis statement is much clearer.  The example of the first thesis statement could be included earlier in the paragraph to help illustrate what is being argued, especially since the subject matter is rather unusual.

Beauty contests are sexist and detrimental to society, and they should be banned everywhere. 

Beauty contests, while they may increase confidence in those who perform in them, can be sexist and harmful because they encourage objectification of women and put an overemphasis on physical appearance. 

The first example is too simple and opinionated. The writer gives his or her point of view, but does not back it up with reasons or facts -- it is just stated. It also offers an overly simplified and extreme solution to the problem. The second example, while still offering a concrete opinion on the subject, gives reasons for this view. The writer is informing the reader of how he or she will go about defending his or her stance. 

Smoking causes lung damage and other health problems. 

Smoking should be made illegal in the United States because of the health problems that it causes. 

The first example is not a point that can be argued against; it is widely known and accepted that smoking is unhealthy. Why write a paper explaining something that everybody already knows and agrees about? The second example can be argued, however: making smoking illegal is one possible solution to the problem, but it still needs to have evidence and argument to back it up because not everybody believes that this is a good solution. 

Exams are not the best way to determine academic successs. 

Exams determine students' talent at test-taking and recall rather than their actual understanding of the material; therefore, instead of exams alone, instructors should employ several different ways of measuring student success, including papers and projects.  

The first example is too broad; it is more of a general topic rather than a thesis. The second example is much more specific. It narrows the thesis down from the problem itself to the solution to the problem. 

Prompt: Describe a character from the movie who shows compassion.

Jack shows compassion.

Jack shows compassion through his kind words, his selfless volunteering, and his forgiveness of Alicia's quick temper.

The first example simply uses the prompt as the thesis statement.  The second example offers support for the statement, preparing the reader for an essay about how Jack's kind words, selfless volunteering and forgiveness show his compassion.

One thing I am going to talk about today is one thing that happened to me one time when I was on this one trip at a place that I was staying at for a certain amount of time. 

Standing on a mountain-top in Israel was an experience that redefined my faith and helped me decide to become an archeologist.

The first example is very vague, providing the reader with almost no information.  The second example gives the reader a clear idea of what the essay is going to be about.  The first example also announces what the author plans to do.  It is much better to launch right into the essay, thereby demosntrating to the reader the purpose of the essay.

  • << Previous: Where Do Theses Come From?
  • Last Updated: May 17, 2023 3:15 PM
  • URL: https://libguides.grace.edu/thesisstatements

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  • Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates

Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates

Published on June 7, 2022 by Tegan George . Revised on November 21, 2023.

A thesis or dissertation outline is one of the most critical early steps in your writing process . It helps you to lay out and organize your ideas and can provide you with a roadmap for deciding the specifics of your dissertation topic and showcasing its relevance to your field.

Generally, an outline contains information on the different sections included in your thesis or dissertation , such as:

  • Your anticipated title
  • Your abstract
  • Your chapters (sometimes subdivided into further topics like literature review, research methods, avenues for future research, etc.)

In the final product, you can also provide a chapter outline for your readers. This is a short paragraph at the end of your introduction to inform readers about the organizational structure of your thesis or dissertation. This chapter outline is also known as a reading guide or summary outline.

Table of contents

How to outline your thesis or dissertation, dissertation and thesis outline templates, chapter outline example, sample sentences for your chapter outline, sample verbs for variation in your chapter outline, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about thesis and dissertation outlines.

While there are some inter-institutional differences, many outlines proceed in a fairly similar fashion.

  • Working Title
  • “Elevator pitch” of your work (often written last).
  • Introduce your area of study, sharing details about your research question, problem statement , and hypotheses . Situate your research within an existing paradigm or conceptual or theoretical framework .
  • Subdivide as you see fit into main topics and sub-topics.
  • Describe your research methods (e.g., your scope , population , and data collection ).
  • Present your research findings and share about your data analysis methods.
  • Answer the research question in a concise way.
  • Interpret your findings, discuss potential limitations of your own research and speculate about future implications or related opportunities.

For a more detailed overview of chapters and other elements, be sure to check out our article on the structure of a dissertation or download our template .

To help you get started, we’ve created a full thesis or dissertation template in Word or Google Docs format. It’s easy adapt it to your own requirements.

 Download Word template    Download Google Docs template

Chapter outline example American English

It can be easy to fall into a pattern of overusing the same words or sentence constructions, which can make your work monotonous and repetitive for your readers. Consider utilizing some of the alternative constructions presented below.

Example 1: Passive construction

The passive voice is a common choice for outlines and overviews because the context makes it clear who is carrying out the action (e.g., you are conducting the research ). However, overuse of the passive voice can make your text vague and imprecise.

Example 2: IS-AV construction

You can also present your information using the “IS-AV” (inanimate subject with an active verb ) construction.

A chapter is an inanimate object, so it is not capable of taking an action itself (e.g., presenting or discussing). However, the meaning of the sentence is still easily understandable, so the IS-AV construction can be a good way to add variety to your text.

Example 3: The “I” construction

Another option is to use the “I” construction, which is often recommended by style manuals (e.g., APA Style and Chicago style ). However, depending on your field of study, this construction is not always considered professional or academic. Ask your supervisor if you’re not sure.

Example 4: Mix-and-match

To truly make the most of these options, consider mixing and matching the passive voice , IS-AV construction , and “I” construction .This can help the flow of your argument and improve the readability of your text.

As you draft the chapter outline, you may also find yourself frequently repeating the same words, such as “discuss,” “present,” “prove,” or “show.” Consider branching out to add richness and nuance to your writing. Here are some examples of synonyms you can use.

If you want to know more about AI for academic writing, AI tools, or research bias, make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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When you mention different chapters within your text, it’s considered best to use Roman numerals for most citation styles. However, the most important thing here is to remain consistent whenever using numbers in your dissertation .

The title page of your thesis or dissertation goes first, before all other content or lists that you may choose to include.

A thesis or dissertation outline is one of the most critical first steps in your writing process. It helps you to lay out and organize your ideas and can provide you with a roadmap for deciding what kind of research you’d like to undertake.

  • Your chapters (sometimes subdivided into further topics like literature review , research methods , avenues for future research, etc.)

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Honors Program

Thesis examples.

  • Thesis Supervisor
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  • Online Approval Instructions
  • Thesis Extensions
  • Publishing in Open Commons

At this point in your college career you are probably most used to projects that can be completed in the span of one semester. Your thesis project will likely span multiple semesters and may be larger than any project you’ve taken on in the past. For those reasons alone, it’s important to look at examples.

Examples can also help you:

  • Learn about potential topics
  • Think creatively and reflectively about your interests and how you will contribute to your field
  • Determine scope and scale of an Honors thesis (as opposed to a Master’s thesis or Doctoral dissertation)
  • Identify potential thesis supervisors
  • Understand methods that may be beneficial in completing your thesis

There are two ways to search:

  • UConn’s Open Commons contains many recent Honors theses.
  • by author’s last name
  • by author’s major
  • by thesis supervisor
  • by the thesis supervisor’s department

If a thesis is available in Open Commons, the title will be hyperlinked within the above PDF files.  Hard copy theses from and 2019 are currently stored in the Honors Program office but are moving soon to the Archives.  Theses from 2018 and older are in the University Archives located at the Dodd Research Center. If you wish to see an older thesis, you must make arrangements through Betsy Pittman at the University Archives Office.

Thesis from 2020 and newer are not available for viewing. They would only be available if the author posted it to Open Commons and it was linked in the PDF’s above.

Note: Questions about the PDFs may be directed to the Honors Program Office .

UCLA History Department

Thesis Statements

What is a thesis statement.

Your thesis statement is one of the most important parts of your paper.  It expresses your main argument succinctly and explains why your argument is historically significant.  Think of your thesis as a promise you make to your reader about what your paper will argue.  Then, spend the rest of your paper–each body paragraph–fulfilling that promise.

Your thesis should be between one and three sentences long and is placed at the end of your introduction.  Just because the thesis comes towards the beginning of your paper does not mean you can write it first and then forget about it.  View your thesis as a work in progress while you write your paper.  Once you are satisfied with the overall argument your paper makes, go back to your thesis and see if it captures what you have argued.  If it does not, then revise it.  Crafting a good thesis is one of the most challenging parts of the writing process, so do not expect to perfect it on the first few tries.  Successful writers revise their thesis statements again and again.

A successful thesis statement:

  • makes an historical argument
  • takes a position that requires defending
  • is historically specific
  • is focused and precise
  • answers the question, “so what?”

How to write a thesis statement:

Suppose you are taking an early American history class and your professor has distributed the following essay prompt:

“Historians have debated the American Revolution’s effect on women.  Some argue that the Revolution had a positive effect because it increased women’s authority in the family.  Others argue that it had a negative effect because it excluded women from politics.  Still others argue that the Revolution changed very little for women, as they remained ensconced in the home.  Write a paper in which you pose your own answer to the question of whether the American Revolution had a positive, negative, or limited effect on women.”

Using this prompt, we will look at both weak and strong thesis statements to see how successful thesis statements work.

While this thesis does take a position, it is problematic because it simply restates the prompt.  It needs to be more specific about how  the Revolution had a limited effect on women and  why it mattered that women remained in the home.

Revised Thesis:  The Revolution wrought little political change in the lives of women because they did not gain the right to vote or run for office.  Instead, women remained firmly in the home, just as they had before the war, making their day-to-day lives look much the same.

This revision is an improvement over the first attempt because it states what standards the writer is using to measure change (the right to vote and run for office) and it shows why women remaining in the home serves as evidence of limited change (because their day-to-day lives looked the same before and after the war).  However, it still relies too heavily on the information given in the prompt, simply saying that women remained in the home.  It needs to make an argument about some element of the war’s limited effect on women.  This thesis requires further revision.

Strong Thesis: While the Revolution presented women unprecedented opportunities to participate in protest movements and manage their family’s farms and businesses, it ultimately did not offer lasting political change, excluding women from the right to vote and serve in office.

Few would argue with the idea that war brings upheaval.  Your thesis needs to be debatable:  it needs to make a claim against which someone could argue.  Your job throughout the paper is to provide evidence in support of your own case.  Here is a revised version:

Strong Thesis: The Revolution caused particular upheaval in the lives of women.  With men away at war, women took on full responsibility for running households, farms, and businesses.  As a result of their increased involvement during the war, many women were reluctant to give up their new-found responsibilities after the fighting ended.

Sexism is a vague word that can mean different things in different times and places.  In order to answer the question and make a compelling argument, this thesis needs to explain exactly what  attitudes toward women were in early America, and  how those attitudes negatively affected women in the Revolutionary period.

Strong Thesis: The Revolution had a negative impact on women because of the belief that women lacked the rational faculties of men. In a nation that was to be guided by reasonable republican citizens, women were imagined to have no place in politics and were thus firmly relegated to the home.

This thesis addresses too large of a topic for an undergraduate paper.  The terms “social,” “political,” and “economic” are too broad and vague for the writer to analyze them thoroughly in a limited number of pages.  The thesis might focus on one of those concepts, or it might narrow the emphasis to some specific features of social, political, and economic change.

Strong Thesis: The Revolution paved the way for important political changes for women.  As “Republican Mothers,” women contributed to the polity by raising future citizens and nurturing virtuous husbands.  Consequently, women played a far more important role in the new nation’s politics than they had under British rule.

This thesis is off to a strong start, but it needs to go one step further by telling the reader why changes in these three areas mattered.  How did the lives of women improve because of developments in education, law, and economics?  What were women able to do with these advantages?  Obviously the rest of the paper will answer these questions, but the thesis statement needs to give some indication of why these particular changes mattered.

Strong Thesis: The Revolution had a positive impact on women because it ushered in improvements in female education, legal standing, and economic opportunity.  Progress in these three areas gave women the tools they needed to carve out lives beyond the home, laying the foundation for the cohesive feminist movement that would emerge in the mid-nineteenth century.

Thesis Checklist

When revising your thesis, check it against the following guidelines:

  • Does my thesis make an historical argument?
  • Does my thesis take a position that requires defending?
  • Is my thesis historically specific?
  • Is my thesis focused and precise?
  • Does my thesis answer the question, “so what?”

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Good Thesis Statement Examples, How to Write, Tips

Good thesis statement examples

Crafting a compelling thesis statement is pivotal in guiding your audience through the heart of your argument. Whether you’re a budding writer or an academic veteran, diving into exemplary thesis statements can refine your understanding and elevate your writing prowess. This guide showcases sterling examples, offers step-by-step writing insights, and provides invaluable tips, ensuring that your thesis statement stands tall with clarity, precision, and confidence.

What is an Example of Good Thesis Statement?

A good thesis statement clearly conveys the main argument or point of a paper and gives direction to the content that follows. Here’s an example of a good thesis statement:

“In William Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth’, the ambition of the main character acts as a double-edged sword, driving him to achieve power at any cost, yet simultaneously leading to his tragic downfall.”

This statement provides a clear position on the role of ambition in the play, setting the stage for a detailed analysis of Macbeth’s character and the play’s themes.

100 Good Thesis Statement Examples

good thesis statement examples

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A thesis statement is the cornerstone of academic writing. It encapsulates the main argument or point of a paper in a concise manner. A well-crafted thesis provides direction for the content and signals to the reader what to expect. Here are 100 examples of good thesis statements to inspire your own academic endeavors.

  • “The advancement of internet technology has revolutionized modern communication, leading to numerous societal changes, including a more interconnected world and the rise of telecommuting.”
  • “Climate change poses a severe threat to global ecosystems, necessitating immediate and substantive action to mitigate its destructive impacts.”
  • “The portrayal of women in classic literature often reflects societal norms of their time, offering insights into gender roles and societal expectations.”
  • “While many view animal testing as a necessary evil, alternative methods can and should be developed to reduce the reliance on animal cruelty.”
  • “The impact of the Industrial Revolution extended beyond economics, reshaping societal structures, living conditions, and even art.”
  • “The rise of fast food has played a significant role in the obesity epidemic facing many developed nations.”
  • “The ‘American Dream’ in Fitzgerald’s ‘The Great Gatsby’ underscores the illusion of prosperity and the decay of moral values in the Roaring Twenties.”
  • “Children exposed to violent video games are more likely to exhibit aggressive behavior, underscoring the need for parental guidance.”
  • “The effects of social media on mental health, particularly among adolescents, is a growing concern that warrants in-depth research and awareness campaigns.”
  • “The colonization of Africa had long-lasting effects, including cultural assimilation, resource exploitation, and the reshaping of geopolitical boundaries.”
  • “Digital currencies, like Bitcoin, present both significant potential for reshaping global finance and inherent risks related to regulation and stability.”
  • “The Renaissance period, while renowned for its artistic achievements, also laid the groundwork for scientific discoveries and the spirit of inquiry.”
  • “Adopting a plant-based diet not only promotes personal health but also significantly reduces one’s carbon footprint.”
  • “In George Orwell’s ‘1984’, the omnipresent surveillance state serves as a chilling commentary on government overreach and the dangers of unchecked power.”
  • “Education reform is essential in addressing systemic inequalities and ensuring every student has access to quality learning.”
  • “The use of renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, is imperative in combating the detrimental effects of fossil fuels.”
  • “The character of Hamlet explores the complex interplay between madness and sanity, revealing deep insights into human nature.”
  • “Urbanization, while driving economic growth, also presents challenges like increased pollution and strains on public infrastructure.”
  • “Migration patterns in the 21st century are heavily influenced by geopolitical unrest, economic disparities, and climate change.”
  • “Childhood vaccinations are crucial in preventing deadly diseases and ensuring the overall health of a community.
  • “Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is not merely a moral obligation but a strategic move that can provide companies with a competitive edge in the modern business environment.”
  • “Despite the advent of e-books and digital reading platforms, physical books remain significant due to their tangible nature and the immersive reading experience they offer.”
  • “The prohibition era in the U.S. illustrates the unintended consequences of policies that don’t consider societal behaviors and demands.”
  • “Despite its controversial nature, stem cell research holds the key to potential cures for terminal diseases and understanding cellular growth.”
  • “Modern education needs to incorporate more emphasis on critical thinking and problem-solving rather than rote memorization.”
  • “The cultural and societal implications of artificial intelligence will be as impactful, if not more, than its technological advancements.”
  • “Language evolves over time, reflecting societal changes, migrations, and cultural mergers, and it’s essential to study these shifts to understand societies better.”
  • “Marketing in the age of social media requires a shift from traditional strategies to a more interactive and customer-centric approach.”
  • “Elderly populations in developed countries are on the rise, necessitating a comprehensive approach to geriatric care and social support systems.”
  • “While globalization has led to more interconnected economies and cultures, it has also resulted in significant cultural homogenization and loss of local identities.”
  • “Mental health, once a taboo subject, requires increased awareness and resources, given its impact on overall health, productivity, and societal well-being.”
  • “Space exploration, beyond its scientific implications, has profound effects on how humans perceive themselves in the universe.”
  • “The concept of heroism in literature has evolved, reflecting societies’ changing values, moral codes, and perceptions of heroics.”
  • “Dietary habits are deeply interwoven with culture, traditions, and in many cases, religious beliefs, making them more than mere choices of food.”
  • “While urbanization offers numerous opportunities, it also exacerbates challenges like housing shortages, traffic congestion, and environmental pollution.”
  • “The global financial crisis of 2008 underscores the need for transparency, regulation, and ethical considerations in banking and investment sectors.”
  • “Art movements, from Renaissance to Surrealism, reflect more than aesthetic preferences: they mirror political, social, and cultural evolutions of their times.”
  • “The rise of gig economies challenges traditional employment models, necessitating new legal and social frameworks.”
  • “Music’s evolution over the decades is not just a progression of genres but a reflection of societal changes, technological advancements, and cultural shifts.”
  • “The ethics of gene editing, especially CRISPR technology, needs comprehensive debate, considering its profound implications on human evolution and identity.
  • “The emergence of telemedicine, accelerated by the global pandemic, offers a new horizon for healthcare but also prompts significant considerations regarding access, quality, and patient privacy.”
  • “Climate change’s implications stretch beyond environmental degradation, influencing migration patterns, geopolitical tensions, and global economic shifts.”
  • “The Renaissance’s influence isn’t restricted to art and literature but extends to scientific thinking, societal norms, and the evolution of political thought.”
  • “Consumerism’s rise in modern societies doesn’t only influence economies but also molds individual identities, values, and life purposes.”
  • “With rising automation, the definition of work is undergoing a transformation, calling for adaptive educational systems and new social structures.”
  • “Historically, pandemics have reshaped societies, and COVID-19’s impacts will be seen in domains ranging from international relations to local community structures.”
  • “The portrayal of women in media, while slowly changing, has long-term effects on societal gender norms and individual self-perceptions.”
  • “The growing popularity of plant-based diets isn’t merely a health trend but a reflection of increasing environmental awareness and ethical considerations.”
  • “While nuclear energy presents a solution to fossil fuel dependency, it also poses profound ethical, environmental, and geopolitical challenges.”
  • “The transformation of the family unit in contemporary societies reveals broader trends concerning mobility, gender roles, and individualism.”
  • “As cryptocurrencies gain traction, they challenge traditional economic systems, question the role of centralized banks, and redefine value.”
  • “Migration patterns throughout history don’t merely reflect economic pursuits but are intertwined with cultural exchanges, conflict resolutions, and the global shaping of identities.”
  • “The minimalist movement goes beyond aesthetic choices, reflecting a broader societal fatigue with consumerism and a quest for genuine experiences.”
  • “The evolution of fashion isn’t just about changing styles but mirrors societal attitudes, economic conditions, and even political movements.”
  • “Increased screen time among younger generations necessitates a reevaluation of learning models, social interactions, and the definition of community.”
  • “Colonization’s legacies are still evident today, influencing global politics, cultural interactions, and even individual identities.”
  • “The pursuit of happiness in modern societies is increasingly tied to material acquisitions, calling for a reevaluation of values and measures of well-being.”
  • “Water scarcity, an impending global challenge, will dictate geopolitical strategies, economic models, and demand innovative technological solutions.”
  • “Digital privacy concerns in the age of big data don’t just relate to personal safety but challenge fundamental rights and the very nature of democracy.”
  • “Urban green spaces, beyond their environmental benefits, play crucial roles in mental well-being, community building, and fostering biodiversity.
  • “While space exploration heralds new frontiers for humanity, it brings forth ethical, financial, and existential questions that must be addressed.”
  • “The dynamics of global politics are increasingly being shaped by technology, redefining national security, diplomacy, and global citizenry.”
  • “The role of folklore in preserving cultural identities is critical in this era of globalization, aiding in understanding shared human experiences.”
  • “Declining bee populations are not only an environmental concern but an impending economic crisis due to their crucial role in pollination.”
  • “The gig economy, while offering flexibility, poses challenges related to job security, benefits, and the very definition of employment.”
  • “Holistic education goes beyond academics, addressing students’ emotional, social, and physical needs, preparing them for the complexities of modern life.”
  • “Urbanization, while indicative of progress, also brings forth challenges related to sustainability, social disparities, and cultural preservation.”
  • “The resurgence of vinyl in a digital age signifies a longing for tangibility and the intrinsic value of experiences.”
  • “Cultural festivals, beyond their entertainment value, serve as bridges for intercultural understanding, fostering peace and global camaraderie.”
  • “The debate over artificial intelligence surpassing human intelligence delves into philosophy, ethics, and the potential redefinition of life itself.”
  • “Genetic editing, while promising medical breakthroughs, also opens Pandora’s box of ethical considerations related to identity, evolution, and societal norms.”
  • “The blending of traditional and western medicine presents opportunities for holistic health solutions, yet raises concerns about authenticity and misuse.”
  • “Mental health awareness in contemporary societies is not just a health concern but an economic, social, and cultural imperative.”
  • “Craftsmanship in the age of mass production celebrates human ingenuity, authenticity, and a counter-narrative to rampant consumerism.”
  • “Language extinction is not merely a linguistic loss but erodes cultural diversity, shared histories, and human perspectives.”
  • “The rise of e-sports challenges traditional definitions of sports, athleticism, and physicality, reflecting shifts in entertainment and cultural values.”
  • “The ocean’s depths, less explored than outer space, harbor potential solutions to medical, technological, and environmental challenges.”
  • “Plant consciousness, while scientifically controversial, encourages a reevaluation of life, inter-species relationships, and our role in the ecosystem.”
  • “The philosophy of minimalism, in contrast to modern excess, suggests a life of purpose, clarity, and sustainable choices.”
  • “Architectural trends, like the tiny house movement, reflect evolving societal values concerning sustainability, materialism, and the concept of home.
  • “The growing popularity of farm-to-table dining isn’t just a culinary trend, but a statement on sustainability, locality, and the personal connection to food sources.”
  • “The proliferation of digital detox retreats illustrates society’s increasing acknowledgment of technology’s impact on mental well-being and the yearning for authentic human interactions.”
  • “Rise of homeschooling, propelled by customizable learning experiences, showcases an evolution in educational philosophies and parental roles in a child’s academic journey.”
  • “The interest in ancestral DNA testing unveils an intrinsic human desire to understand one’s origins, identity, and the interconnectedness of cultures.”
  • “Virtual reality, while a technological marvel, forces us to confront and redefine our understanding of experiences, relationships, and reality itself.”
  • “Solar energy’s ascension isn’t merely about environmental conservation; it’s a testament to human adaptability and the pivot towards sustainable choices.”
  • “Revival of handwritten letters in the digital age signifies a desire for personal connection, authenticity, and the tangible amidst the ephemeral.”
  • “Shifts in fashion towards gender-neutral clothing reflect broader societal conversations around gender identities, fluidity, and the deconstruction of stereotypes.”
  • “The embrace of urban farming in metropolises worldwide underscores the importance of sustainability, self-sufficiency, and reconnection with nature even within urban landscapes.”
  • “The growing trend of unplugged weddings emphasizes the importance of being present, cherishing moments, and prioritizing personal connections over digital documentation.”
  • “The movement towards ethical consumerism isn’t just a shopping trend; it’s a societal shift towards responsibility, awareness, and the power of collective impact.”
  • “The resurgence of board games in an era dominated by video games underscores the human need for direct interaction, strategy, and tactile experiences.”
  • “Sustainable tourism is not merely an industry response; it’s a commitment to preserving culture, environment, and ensuring mutual respect between travelers and local communities.”
  • “Intergenerational living, or multiple generations under one roof, challenges the conventional Western living standards and underscores the importance of family, shared responsibilities, and cultural preservation.”
  • “The adoption of adult coloring books highlights the universal need for creative outlets, mindfulness, and the therapeutic value of art.”
  • “The zero-waste movement is more than an environmental initiative; it’s a global call to action, emphasizing individual responsibility and systemic change.”
  • “The increasing importance given to soft skills in professional settings speaks to the evolving understanding of holistic employee value, team dynamics, and long-term organizational success.”
  • “The preference for experiences over possessions among younger generations challenges materialistic values and emphasizes the impermanence and value of memories.”
  • “The rise of artisanal and handcrafted goods counters the age of mass production and highlights the appreciation for uniqueness, tradition, and human touch.”
  • “The embrace of slow living in fast-paced societies underscores the yearning for mindfulness, purpose, and the significance of life’s simple pleasures.

Good Thesis Statement Starter Examples

Beginning a thesis statement requires a concise premise that draws the reader’s attention. Here are examples that illustrate how to commence your thesis effectively:

  • “First and foremost, urban development…”
  • “At the core of this argument, environmental conservation…”
  • “Central to this discussion, global economic trends…”
  • “Fundamentally, artistic expression…”
  • “The primary consideration, ethical consumption…”
  • “An essential perspective, child development…”
  • “At the heart of the matter, digital communication…”
  • “Rooted in historical context, the Renaissance era…”
  • “Pivotal to this debate, the role of artificial intelligence…”
  • “Integral to this analysis, cultural integration…”

Good Thesis Statement Examples for Research Paper

A thesis statement for research paper demands a clear, specific, and thought-provoking thesis. Here are suitable examples:

  • “Recent studies on climate change demonstrate the dire need for renewable energy transition.”
  • “Neurological research reveals that bilingualism significantly impacts cognitive ability.”
  • “Archaeological evidence from the Mediterranean supports the existence of matriarchal societies in ancient times.”
  • “Data-driven marketing strategies have revolutionized e-commerce and consumer behavior.”
  • “A review of mental health studies shows a strong correlation between social media usage and anxiety among teenagers.”
  • “Genetic research indicates certain mutations as predictive markers for specific cancers.”
  • “Recent advancements in AI are tracing the line between human intelligence and machine learning.”
  • “Microplastics in marine ecosystems have a detrimental effect, as indicated by recent oceanographic research.”
  • “Quantitative analysis of global trade indicates a shift towards service-oriented economies.”
  • “Cultural anthropology studies reveal the importance of oral narratives in indigenous societies.”

Good Thesis Statement Examples for Essays

Crafting a thesis for essays involves capturing the essence of your narrative or argument. Here are examples:

  • “Modern parenting challenges differ significantly from those of a generation ago, especially with the rise of technology.”
  • “Nostalgia, while a comforting emotion, can sometimes prevent progress and keep us anchored to the past.”
  • “The introduction of digital reading is redefining the experience of literature.”
  • “Despite its challenges, traveling solo can be an enlightening and transformative experience.”
  • “Embracing minimalism can lead to a more fulfilling and less cluttered life.”
  • “The transition from childhood to adulthood is marked by significant emotional, social, and psychological changes.”
  • “A vegan lifestyle, beyond dietary preferences, represents a choice for health and ethical practices.”
  • “Cultural festivals, more than celebrations, are reflections of identity, heritage, and community bonding.”
  • “Design, in its essence, isn’t just about aesthetics, but about function, purpose, and intuition.”
  • “Music transcends languages, bridging gaps, and resonating emotions universally.”

Good Thesis Statement Examples for Argumentative Essay

An argumentative essay’s thesis statement should clearly state your position. Here are solid stances:

  • “Compulsory voting ensures a democratic process that truly reflects a nation’s collective decision.”
  • “While technology has its advantages, it cannot replace the value of traditional classroom learning.”
  • “Animal testing is not only ethically problematic but also scientifically limited and should be replaced with alternative methods.”
  • “Legalizing marijuana can provide significant economic benefits and reduce crime rates.”
  • “Censorship, under the guise of protection, can often stifle creativity and freedom of expression.”
  • “Childhood vaccinations should be mandatory, given their crucial role in preventing outbreaks and ensuring public health.”
  • “Fast fashion is not only environmentally harmful but also promotes unethical labor practices.”
  • “Privacy in the digital age is not a luxury but a fundamental human right that needs stringent protection.”
  • “While sports promote discipline and teamwork, an undue emphasis on winning can deter the essence of play.”
  • “Capital punishment, despite its deterrent effect, raises ethical dilemmas and should be reconsidered.”

Good Thesis Statement Examples for Compare and Contrast Essay

Compare and contrast essays require a clear delineation between two subjects. Here are examples that set the stage:

  • “While both classical and modern music have their merits, they cater to different emotional palettes and generational contexts.”
  • “Ancient Greek and Ancient Egyptian civilizations, though contemporaries, had distinctly different cultural and architectural achievements.”
  • “Freelancing and traditional employment both have their pros and cons concerning flexibility, job security, and career growth.”
  • “While both Apple and Microsoft have impacted computing, their philosophies, aesthetics, and user experiences differ markedly.”
  • “Renting and buying a home, each have their financial implications, but also offer varying degrees of freedom and permanence.”
  • “Both introversion and extraversion have unique strengths and challenges, influencing how individuals navigate social contexts.”
  • “American football and soccer, while both team sports, have different rules, global reach, and cultural significance.”
  • “While cats are known for their independence, dogs are often appreciated for their loyalty and companionship.”
  • “Novels and short stories, though both literary forms, cater to different attention spans and narrative depths.”
  • “Traditional marketing and digital marketing, while aiming for the same goal, employ different mediums and strategies.

Good Thesis Statement Examples About Success

Success is multifaceted and personal. These thesis statements delve into various perceptions and interpretations of success:

  • “Success isn’t merely measured by financial wealth but by personal growth and fulfillment.”
  • “True success lies in one’s ability to maintain balance in personal and professional life.”
  • “For many, success is the realization of personal freedom and the ability to dictate one’s own pace of life.”
  • “Modern society often equates success with material possession, overlooking emotional and spiritual well-being.”
  • “The journey, with its challenges and lessons, is as significant as the end-point in defining success.”
  • “Success in academics doesn’t always translate to success in real-life scenarios and vice versa.”
  • “The parameters of success differ across cultures, reflecting diverse values and priorities.”
  • “Individuals who overcome adversity often have a richer understanding of success.”
  • “Long-term contentment and understanding of self are underappreciated markers of success.”
  • “Success isn’t static; its definition evolves with personal experiences and milestones.”

Good Thesis Statement Examples for College

College life brings about a plethora of experiences and learnings. These college essay thesis statements shed light on the myriad facets of collegiate life:

  • “College isn’t merely an academic pursuit but a journey of self-discovery and growth.”
  • “The college experience is as much about developing soft skills as it is about academic excellence.”
  • “While college provides a structured learning environment, self-motivation remains a critical determinant of success.”
  • “Extracurricular activities in college play a pivotal role in shaping an individual’s character and perspective.”
  • “The diversity in a college setting fosters cultural appreciation and global-mindedness.”
  • “College debts, while burdensome, are investments in one’s future potential and aspirations.”
  • “Digital advancements have revolutionized the traditional college experience, making education more accessible.”
  • “The challenges faced during college years equip individuals with resilience and adaptability for future endeavors.”
  • “Networking in college can pave the way for professional opportunities and lasting friendships.”
  • “Critical thinking, a skill honed in college, is indispensable in navigating real-world complexities.”

Good Thesis Statement Examples for Students

Student life is characterized by its challenges, learnings, and milestones. These thesis statements reflect diverse aspects of student experiences:

  • “Balancing academics with extracurriculars equips students with multitasking abilities and time management skills.”
  • “For students, failure can be a profound learning experience, shaping resilience and adaptability.”
  • “Modern students grapple with the pressures of digital distractions and the advantages of technology-enhanced learning.”
  • “International exchange programs provide students with a broader perspective and cultural appreciation.”
  • “Students today are more attuned to global issues, thanks to digital interconnectedness.”
  • “Peer pressure, while often viewed negatively, can also motivate students to excel and set higher benchmarks.”
  • “Real-life education, often neglected in curriculum, is crucial in preparing students for adulthood challenges.”
  • “Active participation in student governance instills leadership qualities and a sense of responsibility.”
  • “Practical internships and workshops complement theoretical knowledge, giving students an edge in professional realms.”
  • “Mental health and well-being are as vital as academic achievements for holistic student development.”

Good Thesis Statement Examples About a Person

Thesis statements about individuals shed light on their characteristics, achievements, or significance. Here are some crafted examples:

  • “Nelson Mandela’s resilience against apartheid showcases the power of perseverance in the face of adversity.”
  • “Steve Jobs, beyond his technological innovations, exemplified the essence of visionary leadership and creative thinking.”
  • “Mother Teresa’s life underscores the profound impact of compassion and selflessness in addressing societal challenges.”
  • “Frida Kahlo, through her art, gave voice to pain, love, and the complexities of identity.”
  • “Mahatma Gandhi’s principle of non-violence resonates globally, advocating peace over conflict.”
  • “Oprah Winfrey’s journey from adversity to global influence underscores the possibilities of determination and a positive mindset.”
  • “Leonardo da Vinci, a polymath, exemplifies the limitless potential of human curiosity and innovation.”
  • “Malala Yousafzai’s advocacy for girls’ education sheds light on the transformative power of youth activism.”
  • “Elon Musk’s ventures span various industries, reflecting an insatiable quest for innovation and progress.”
  • “Jane Austen, through her novels, offered incisive commentary on society, love, and individuality.”

Good Thesis Statement Examples About Family

Family forms the foundational fabric of our lives. These thesis statements reflect on its multifaceted nature:

  • “The modern family structure has evolved, reflecting societal changes and diverse cultural norms.”
  • “Families, beyond biological ties, are bound by shared experiences, values, and unconditional support.”
  • “Blended families, with their unique challenges, underscore the universality of love and understanding.”
  • “The role of grandparents in families extends beyond tradition, offering wisdom and timeless bonds.”
  • “In the digital age, maintaining familial connections requires conscious efforts amidst technological distractions.”
  • “The dynamics of sibling relationships play a pivotal role in shaping individual personalities and perspectives.”
  • “Families act as safe havens, providing emotional anchorage in an unpredictable world.”
  • “The challenges of modern parenting lie in balancing tradition with contemporary realities.”
  • “Familial roles are fluid, constantly adapting to changing life stages and circumstances.”
  • “Family traditions, while reflective of heritage, also evolve, mirroring changing times and values.”

Good Thesis Statement Examples About Life

Life, with its myriad experiences, offers endless perspectives. These thesis statements delve into its vast expanse:

  • “Life’s unpredictability demands resilience, adaptability, and an undying spirit of exploration.”
  • “Digital advancements, while enhancing life’s quality, also present challenges to genuine human connections.”
  • “The pursuit of happiness in life is a journey of self-discovery, introspection, and meaningful connections.”
  • “Life’s challenges, often viewed as setbacks, are pivotal in shaping character and destiny.”
  • “The essence of life lies in cherishing fleeting moments, recognizing their transient nature.”
  • “Balancing personal aspirations with societal expectations is a recurring challenge in modern life.”
  • “Mindfulness practices, in the hustle of life, offer solace and a deeper connection to the present.”
  • “Life, in its essence, is a continuous learning experience, offering lessons in unexpected places.”
  • “The concept of success in life is personal, reflecting individual goals, values, and benchmarks.”
  • “Life’s beauty lies in its diversity, presenting myriad experiences, emotions, and milestones.

What 3 things should be in a good thesis?

A well-crafted thesis statement serves as the backbone of your paper, providing clarity and direction. For a thesis to be effective, it should possess the following three characteristics:

  • Clear Focus: The thesis should pinpoint a specific idea or argument rather than being overly broad or vague. It should give the reader a clear understanding of what the paper will discuss.
  • Arguable Point: A good thesis often presents an argument that could be challenged. It shouldn’t state a fact but rather a claim that others might dispute.
  • Supporting Evidence or Reasoning: While the thesis statement doesn’t need to list all the supporting points, it should hint at or introduce the line of reasoning you’ll use to back up your claim.

How do you write a catchy thesis statement? – Step by Step Guide

  • Understand the Assignment: Before crafting your thesis, make sure you comprehend the requirements of the assignment. Is it analytical, argumentative, expository, etc.?
  • Research the Topic: A thorough understanding of your subject matter will help you formulate a robust and intriguing thesis. Dive deep into the available literature.
  • Identify a Specific Focus: Narrow down your topic to a specific area of interest or argument.
  • Draft a Preliminary Statement: Begin with a broad thesis statement, which you can refine as you progress.
  • Make it Debatable: Ensure your thesis makes a claim or presents a viewpoint that others could challenge.
  • Keep it Concise: While your thesis should be detailed enough to convey your argument, it should also be succinct and free from unnecessary jargon.
  • Revise and Refine: As you continue your research and start writing, revisit your thesis. Make sure it remains relevant and adjust as necessary for clarity and precision.
  • Seek Feedback: Discuss your thesis with peers, instructors, or mentors to get their insights.
  • Finalize with Confidence: Once you’ve honed your thesis to its best form, confidently place it at the beginning of your paper, usually at the end of the introduction.

Tips for Writing a Good Thesis Statement

  • Position it Right: Typically, the thesis statement should be at the end of your introduction, setting the tone for the rest of the paper.
  • Avoid Ambiguity: Be clear and precise. Vague thesis statements can confuse readers.
  • Stay Away from Clichés: While some generic statements can apply to many topics, they often lack depth and originality.
  • Use Strong Language: Avoid wishy-washy phrases like “I think” or “I believe.” Be assertive in presenting your argument.
  • Stay Relevant: As you progress in your writing, ensure every part of your paper supports or relates back to your thesis.
  • Avoid Superlatives: Words like “best,” “most,” “all,” etc., can make your thesis weaker. Stick to more nuanced language.
  • Revisit Regularly: As your paper evolves, make sure your thesis remains applicable. Adjust if necessary to reflect your paper’s direction.
  • Limit to One or Two Sentences: While this isn’t a strict rule, a concise thesis often makes a stronger point.
  • Practice Makes Perfect: The more you practice writing thesis statements, the better you’ll get at crafting compelling and effective ones.
  • Stay Passionate: If you’re genuinely interested in your thesis, it’ll reflect in your writing, making your entire paper more engaging.

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COMMENTS

  1. 25 Thesis Statement Examples That Will Make Writing a Breeze

    Thesis statement examples A quick note that these thesis statements have not been fully researched. These are merely examples to show you what a thesis statement might look like and how you can implement your own ideas into one that you think of independently. As such, you should not use these thesis statements for your own research paper purposes.

  2. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    A thesis statement is a sentence that summarizes the central point of your paper or essay. It usually comes near the end of your introduction. Learn how to write a thesis statement with four simple steps and see examples for argumentative and expository essays.

  3. What Is a Thesis?

    What Is a Thesis? | Ultimate Guide & Examples Published on September 14, 2022 by Tegan George . Revised on November 21, 2023. A thesis is a type of research paper based on your original research. It is usually submitted as the final step of a master's program or a capstone to a bachelor's degree. Writing a thesis can be a daunting experience.

  4. Prize-Winning Thesis and Dissertation Examples

    Find out how to write a high-quality thesis or dissertation with the help of previous work done by other students on similar topics. This article collects a list of undergraduate, master's, and Ph.D. theses and dissertations that have won prizes for their research in various fields and disciplines.

  5. Creating a Thesis Statement, Thesis Statement Tips

    1. Determine what kind of paper you are writing: An analytical paper breaks down an issue or an idea into its component parts, evaluates the issue or idea, and presents this breakdown and evaluation to the audience. An expository (explanatory) paper explains something to the audience.

  6. Thesis Statements

    A thesis statement is a road map for your argument that tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion. Learn how to craft or refine one for your draft, and see examples of thesis statements for different types of writing.

  7. Strong Thesis Statements

    Example of a debatable thesis statement: At least 25 percent of the federal budget should be spent on limiting pollution. This is an example of a debatable thesis because reasonable people could disagree with it. Some people might think that this is how we should spend the nation's money.

  8. Thesis

    A thesis is the central claim in your essay that supports your analysis of a source or topic. Learn how to write a strong thesis that is arguable, relevant, and well-supported by evidence from the text or other sources. See examples of thesis statements for different types of claims and questions.

  9. PDF How to Create a Strong Thesis Statement

    1. A strong thesis statement takes some sort of stand. Remember that your thesis needs to show your conclusions about a subject. For example, if you are writing a paper for a class on fitness, you might be asked to choose a popular weight-loss product to evaluate. Here are two thesis statements:

  10. How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement: 4 Steps + Examples

    Step 4: Revise and refine your thesis statement before you start writing. Read through your thesis statement several times before you begin to compose your full essay. You need to make sure the statement is ironclad, since it is the foundation of the entire paper. Edit it or have a peer review it for you to make sure everything makes sense and ...

  11. University Thesis and Dissertation Templates

    Purdue OWL Graduate Writing Thesis & Dissertation University Thesis and Dissertation Templates University Thesis and Dissertation Templates Theses and dissertations are already intensive, long-term projects that require a lot of effort and time from their authors.

  12. 25 Thesis Statement Examples (2024)

    Strong Thesis Statement Examples 1. School Uniforms "Mandatory school uniforms should be implemented in educational institutions as they promote a sense of equality, reduce distractions, and foster a focused and professional learning environment." Best For: Argumentative Essay or Debate Read More: School Uniforms Pros and Cons 2. Nature vs Nurture

  13. PDF Sample Thesis Pages

    Sample Thesis/Dissertation Approval (TDA) Form Master's Students . Number of signatures required for . master's students = student's adviser (at least one signature in the

  14. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Example 1: In a biochemistry class, you've been asked to write an essay explaining the impact of bisphenol A on the human body. Your thesis statement might say, "This essay will make clear the correlation between bisphenol A exposure and hypertension.". Check Circle.

  15. 20+ Outstanding Thesis Statement Examples for Students

    1. Thesis Statement Examples for Different Essay Types 2. Thesis Statement Examples for Research Paper 3. Elements of a Good Thesis Statement Thesis Statement Examples for Different Essay Types A thesis statement is like the central message of your essay. It states the main claim along with the reason or rationale that supports the claim.

  16. Thesis Statements: Examples

    Example 1 Poor Bullying in elementary schools is getting worse, because children model what they see at home and there are more cases of physical and emotional child abuse, and this causes various emotional problems in children. Better

  17. 45 Perfect Thesis Statement Templates (+ Examples)

    A thesis statement template focuses your arguments and ideas into a single sentence. Use it to present your essay's topic and to share your point of view regarding the topic. The thesis statement must tell the reader about the essay, help guide your writing process, and help you focus on your arguments.

  18. Dissertation & Thesis Outline

    Abstract "Elevator pitch" of your work (often written last). Introduction Introduce your area of study, sharing details about your research question, problem statement, and hypotheses. Situate your research within an existing paradigm or conceptual or theoretical framework. Literature Review Subdivide as you see fit into main topics and sub-topics.

  19. Thesis Examples

    There are two ways to search: UConn's Open Commons contains many recent Honors theses. For Honors graduates, all Honors theses written between 2006 - 2021 are listed in the following PDFs and the titles are hyperlinked to Open Commons where available: by author's last name .pdf by author's major .pdf by thesis supervisor .pdf

  20. Thesis Statements

    Your thesis statement is one of the most important parts of your paper. It expresses your main argument succinctly and explains why your argument is historically significant. Think of your thesis as a promise you make to your reader about what your paper will argue. Then, spend the rest of your paper-each body paragraph-fulfilling that promise.

  21. 100+ Good Thesis Statement Examples, How to Write, Tips

    Here are 100 examples of good thesis statements to inspire your own academic endeavors. "The advancement of internet technology has revolutionized modern communication, leading to numerous societal changes, including a more interconnected world and the rise of telecommuting.". "Climate change poses a severe threat to global ecosystems ...

  22. 27 Outstanding College Essay Examples From Top Universities 2023

    This college essay tip is by Abigail McFee, Admissions Counselor for Tufts University and Tufts '17 graduate. 2. Write like a journalist. "Don't bury the lede!" The first few sentences must capture the reader's attention, provide a gist of the story, and give a sense of where the essay is heading.

  23. PDF A Sample Research Paper/Thesis/Dissertation on Aspects of Elementary

    Definition. A finite set of linear equations in the variables x1, x2, . . . , xn is called. a system of linear equations. Not all systems of linear equations has solutions. A system of equations that has no solution is said to be inconsistent. If there is at least one solution, it is called consistent.